background preloader

Australia Facts for Kids: Facts about Australia for Kids

Australia Facts for Kids: Facts about Australia for Kids
Interesting Facts for Kids Here are some interesting Australia Facts which were chosen and researched by kids especially for kids. Name: Commonwealth of AustraliaGovernment: DemocracyPopulation: 23, 6 million (2013)Capital: Canberra with 380,000 people (2013)Language: English Australia Geography Australia is the smallest inhabited continent of the seven continents can also be considered the largest island in the world. In fact it is an island continent. The country is divided into six states (Southern Australia, Western Australia, New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria and Tasmania) and two self-governing territories: Northern Territory and Australian Capital Territory (which is around Canberra, the capital city). The main cities in Australia are: Sydney, Melbourne, Perth, Brisbane, Darwin, Adelaide, Hobart and Canberra (capital city) The highest mountain of Australia is Mount Kosciuszko with 2.228metres or 7,310ft. Did you know? Australia Facts:Australia Attractions for Kids Australian Animals

http://www.kids-world-travel-guide.com/australia-facts.html

Related:  listeningReading

Free English Reading comprehension tests and exercises online Reading comprehension is also an important part when you take an English test. Reading comprehension test can help you to improve vocabulary, grammar, and logical thought ability. There are some tips for you to improve reading skills: - Practice reading every day. Australia Australia's ecosystem is an unusual one because of its remote location. As a result, there are many animal species that occur here and nowhere else in the world, such as the platypus, kangaroo, echidna, and koala. Australia has 516 national parks to protect its unique plants and animals. One of Australia's most amazing sites rises like an enormous whale's back from a flat red-soil desert called the Red Center.

National Geographic See photos of Australia (including Ayers Rock, Sydney, koalas, and more) in this travel photo gallery from National Geographic. PUBLISHED November 11, 2010 Inside the efforts to help animals hurt by the Amazon fires Oceans and ice are absorbing the brunt of climate change Rare polka-dotted zebra foal photographed in Kenya Podcasts to help English learners practise listening Do your students want more listening practice? Aoife McLoughlin, blogger with ELT-Connect.com and latest winner of the British Council's Teaching English blog award, recommends five podcasts to get them started. Do you spend enough time working on listening skills with your students?

To My Old Master In 1864, after 32 long years in the service of his master, Jourdon Anderson and his wife, Amanda, escaped a life of slavery when Union Army soldiers freed them from the plantation on which they had been working so tirelessly. They grasped the opportunity with vigour, quickly moved to Ohio where Jourdon could find paid work with which to support his growing family, and didn’t look back. Then, a year later, shortly after the end of the Civil War, Jourdon received a desperate letter from Patrick Henry Anderson, the man who used to own him, in which he was asked to return to work on the plantation and rescue his ailing business. Jourdon’s reply to the person who enslaved his family, dictated from his home on August 7th, is everything you could wish for, and quite rightly was subsequently reprinted in numerous newspapers. Jourdon Anderson never returned to Big Spring, Tennessee.

The 7-step Listening Challenge How can your students develop their listening while away from your English classes ? A learner training moment of reflection on how to take responsibility for their language acquisition. Quiz me *Do you need to train your ears for the different accents and pronunciation out there? *Is it important to listen to a recording on a particular topic to check your general understanding? *Would you like to have a chance to check your pronunciation and intonation? 25 Reading Strategies That Work In Every Content Area 25 Reading Strategies That Work In Every Content Area Reading is reading. By understanding that letters make sounds, we can blend those sounds together to make whole sounds that symbolize meaning we can all exchange with one another. Without getting too Platonic about it all, reading doesn’t change simply because you’re reading a text from another content area. Only sometimes it does. Science content can often by full of jargon, research citations, and odd text features.

11 must-see TED-Ed lessons Short animated lessons you’ll love, from atomic structure to the science of stage fright (and how to overcome it). Bite-size snacks of knowledge, TED-Ed Video Lessons are short, free educational videos written by educators and students, then animated by some of the most creative minds in the business. The topics of these addictive little videos range from quantum physics to the art of beatboxing, and once you watch one, you may want to watch 10 more. Know an animator or educator who could make a great TED-Ed Lesson? Extensive reading: why it is good for our students… and for us. What is Extensive Reading (ER)?Extensive Reading is often referred to but it is worth checking on what it actually involves. Richard Day has provided a list of key characteristics of ER (Day 2002). This is complemented by Philip Prowse (2002). Maley (2008) deals with ER comprehensively. The following is a digest of the two lists of factors or principles for successful ER:

Related: