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Minecraft ! Comment l'utiliser en classe ?

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The Minecraft Teacher MinecraftEdu & Minecraft: Education Edition minecraftedu: As you might have already heard, Microsoft will be acquiring MinecraftEdu. You can read their announcement here. We’ll be posting FAQ on our website later today but here are some quick facts for MinecraftEdu users: You can keep using MinecraftEdu as long as you like.MinecraftEdu sales will continue normally for now.MinecraftEdu owners will be offered one year of the new Education Edition for free.MinecraftEdu Hosted Servers will keep working, and can still sign up for one.TeacherGaming won’t be going anywhere and we have new exciting plans for the future!We wanted to take the opportunity and share our thoughts on the matter. iPad Apps Classified by SAMR model The SAMR model helps teachers and educators understand and better integrate technology into their teaching and learning. This model was created by Dr Robin Puentudura with the explicit aim of helping teachers in designing, developing and integrating digital media to increase students overall academic achievements. The four levels of this model are : Substitution, augmentation, modification and redefinition. Have a look at the image below to learn more about these four levels. The image is taken from Summer Tech Institute. If you want to go deeper into SAMR , I would recommend this PDF from Dr Ruben himself.

Report Finds ‘Deeper Learning’ Model Improves Outcomes for All Students The conversation about what kids need to know and to be able to do by the end of high school has gradually shifted over the past several years to emphasize not just rigorous content goals, but also less tangible skills, such as creative thinking, problem-solving and collaboration. That shift has brought schools that are practicing “deeper learning” into focus. The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation has been a big supporter of this work, defining deeper learning as a model that focuses on critical thinking, communication, collaboration, academic mindsets and learning how to learn, all through rigorous content. New research conducted by the American Institutes for Research (AIR) has found that the deeper learning model does have positive learning outcomes for students, regardless of their background. The model is often critiqued as a framework that only works for high-achieving learners. AIR investigators also looked at more traditional measures of achievement — tests.

Minecraft in education Minecraft can be an educational tool that facilitates cooperation and teamwork among players. Educational benefits[edit | edit source] Minecraft can have huge educational benefits for children; it can help teach numerous subjects both with and without adult involvement. Learning in Minecraft can be faster than traditional methods of education, as children are often far more motivated, get more practice, and feel that what they are learning is useful. Ideas for Using Minecraft in the Classroom As is the nature of sandbox games, players can roam free, choosing objectives as they go. Because Minecraft has such open possibilities and potential, the teacher can choose how he or she wants to use it. Just as the student has the ability to be creative, the teacher has the same. That can be overwhelming, but luckily, there is a tool for using Minecraft created by teachers for teachers. MinecraftEdu provides a custom mod, basically a customized modification of the game, that helps facilitate organization and focus for teachers to use Minecraft effectively. In addition, Joel Levin, the founder of MinecraftEdu, provides ideas and updates at The Minecraft Teacher blog.

DRAGONBOX ALGEBRA - The game that secretly teaches algebra ALGEBRAlisa Get it now! The Most Fun Way To Learn Algebra DragonBox is a series of learning tools for algebra that can teach anyone to solve equations by turning algebra into an intuitive and motivating game. Finally: Record the Screen of Your iPad in Any App, with Narration. Yesterday X-Mirage added the ability to record not only your iPad screen and audio via Airplay, but also your voice narration. I’ve been waiting for someone to implement this for ages. First, Before we get to the details, here’s a little video I made to demonstrate how good the result is. I’m a fan of iPad screencasting apps like Educreations, Collaaj and Explain Everything, but the limitation on all these apps is that they can only record within the app itself, due to Apple’s sandboxing policy. In other words you can’t use Explain Everything to make a video tutorial about how to change settings in the Settings app, or how to create an eBook in Book Creator or how to write a formula in Numbers or Excel. Nor can you use them in combination with a content-based app to make a screencast explaining a topic.

How to Create Timelines With the RWT Timeline Creator Read Write Think offers a bunch of great web, iOS, and Android applications for students. Their timeline creation tool is a good one for elementary school and middle school use. RWT Timeline is available as a web app (Flash required), as an Android app, and as an iPad app. All three versions make it easy for students to create a timeline for a series of events. In the video below I demonstrate how to use the web version of the RWT Timeline creation tool. Applications for Education The Android and iPad versions of RWT Timeline support multiple user profiles making it a great choice for classrooms that have more students than tablets. How Teachers are Using Minecraft for Education Can popular video games actually be used as educational games? With gamification being all the rage, it’s not such a far-fetched idea. Take Minecraft, which has over 100 million users. Over 3000 schools around the world use it for teaching (200 in the UK).

Minecraft in the Classroom Teaches Reading and More Last month, Scientific American declared, "... not only is Minecraft immersive and creative, but it is an excellent platform for making almost any subject area more engaging.” That’s a nod from a top science magazine to the game many parents wish their kids had never heard of. This endorsement follows Common Sense Media's seal of approval. On the surface, it's not so surprising. Using LEGO to Build Math Concepts I was not one of those LEGO® kids growing up. Sure, my brothers had LEGO bricks, and every so often I’d kidnap some tiny LEGO men for a make-believe game. But I didn’t truly appreciate the engineering capacity of those studded plastic bricks. They were just so rigidly rectangular! As an adult, I’ve come to appreciate LEGO, both for its rectilinear aesthetic, and even more so, for its mathematical might. In the classroom, the tiny bricks are now my favorite possibility-packed math manipulative!

Educational Technology and Mobile Learning: 15 Effective Ways to Use Google Docs in Class June 19, 2014 I spend a considerable time every single day browsing the net tracking new updates in the world of educational technology and, often times, in the midst of this journey I would come across wonderful resources and tutorials that usually end up in one of my posts here in this blog. So after the previous guide on how to be a Google Drive master , today I am sharing with you another awesome guide created by Eric Curts entitled "The paperless Classroom with Google Docs". This guide is available for free in a Google doc format from this link. In this guide, Eric walks you through the different stages of turning your classroom into a digitally focussed environment where you will no longer have any need for papers. This is al done through the effective use of the different Google Drive features and functionalities.

Book Review: Practical Ways to Spark Student Creativity in Our Classrooms by Cathy Gassenheimer “Wonder is a powerful word to use with students, and it is a great way to access imagination.” Thus begins one of 40 “Grab and Go Ideas” interspersed in a new ASCD book, Sparking Student Creativity: Practical Ways to Promote Innovative Thinking and Problem Solving, by Patti Drapeau. Students who think creatively, Drapeau says: • Express ideas other students don't think of. • Like to choose their own way of demonstrating understanding. • Ask questions that may seem off-topic or silly. • Enjoy open-ended assignments. • Prefer to discuss ideas rather than facts. • Prefer to try new ways of approaching a problem rather than accepted ways. The book can serve as a good guide for teachers who want to spur creative thinking in their classrooms and make their lessons more engaging for students. Chocked full of tools, rubrics, and the aforementioned “Grab and Go” ideas, the book can also be a valuable resource as teachers plan CCRS-aligned, student-centered lessons.

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