background preloader

These Are The Surprising Jobs You'll Be Doing By The 2030s

These Are The Surprising Jobs You'll Be Doing By The 2030s

http://io9.com/these-are-the-surprising-jobs-youll-be-doing-by-the-203-1577363367

Related:  storiaFuture JobsSkills for Future JobsPlaneringsidéerwerk en de toekomst

Don't Fear the Robots Taking Your Job, Fear the Monopolies Behind Them As algorithms and automatons start to code and roll their way into our workplaces, there’s a looming sense that employment is set for a pretty major shift. Maybe not quite yet, but slowly and surely, the robots are showing themselves to be capable of taking on jobs once held by humans. They’re more accurate than us, more consistent; they run for longer, they’re satisfied with their work (or at least not unsatisfied), and they don’t kick up a fuss about a living wage. But to worry about robots “stealing our jobs”—an oversimplified rhetoric that sounds all too familiar—is to ignore the greater potential upheaval in our economy.

The Future of Work: Quantified Employees, Pop-Up Workplaces, And More Telepresence For many people, especially those working at desk jobs, the workplace is very different than it was 20 years ago: there’s a computer at every desk, telecommuting is fairly common, and the traditional cubicle is giving way to more collaborative spaces. We’ve seen predictions about where we’ll go from here before; now PSFK, a popular blog that also happens to be a thriving consultancy, has come up with its own version of the future of work, described in a new 138-page report. It’s not as fantastical as many future-forward reports--it’s planted firmly in ideas that are already gaining a lot of traction. Encouraging the Einstein and Edison in Everyone The 21st century will require solutions that are fashioned differently from how the problems were made. The solutions of this century will come from creative people who are willing to look at doing things differently. As such, the future will need more Albert Einsteins and Thomas Edisons -- and by the way, there is a bit of them in all of us.

Garbage designer, robot counsellor among the predicted jobs of 2030 About 15 years from now, farmers will have made their way from the countryside to the city, counsellors will help ensure the right robot goes to the right family and garbage designers will lead the upcycling movement. Those are some predictions made by the Canadian Scholarship Trust Plan’s Inspired Minds initiative, which aims to give Canadians a sneak peek of the job market in 2030. Some of the more curious careers include: Nostalgist: A mix between a therapist, an interior designer and a historical researcher, a nostalgist will help the wealthy elderly of 2030 create a living space inspired by their favourite decade. Rewilder: The old name for this job was "farmer." But instead of growing crops, rewilders will be tasked with undoing environmental damage to the countryside.

If Schools Don't Change, Robots Will Bring On a 'Permanent Underclass': Report Robots are taking all the jobs. But are we, the average, moderately skilled humans, screwed, or aren't we? Let me just get it out of the way now: We are, unless there are drastic, immediate changes to education and economic systems around the world. The dominant narrative going around today about Pew Research's new report on artificial intelligence and the future of jobs is that experts can't really decide whether automation is going to make working obsolete, that it's really a toss up whether robots will simply create new jobs in other sectors as they destroy ones in other. That's true, in one sense: The 1,896 futurists, CEOs, journalists, and university professors questioned for the report were split in half over robots will "displace significant numbers of both blue- and white-collar workers," with 52 percent of respondents agreeing that "human ingenuity will create new jobs, industries, and ways to make a living, just as it has been doing since the dawn of the Industrial Revolution."

10 well paid jobs of the future Mr Bellini posited the idea of an elderly well-being consultant, who specialises in personalised care for older patients, or a memory augmentation surgeon who helps counter memory loss. He also saw big changes in farming as food resources became scarce, with genetically modified crops becoming common and crops grown vertically in areas resembling multi-storey car parks to save space. Ian Pearson, a futurologist who wrote You Tomorrow, sees job growth in the field of augmented reality, where the real world is overlaid with computer-generated images. Future of Work: What Skills Will Help Us Keep Pace? From Elon Musk’s tweet that artificial intelligence may be more dangerous than nuclear weapons to the growing clamor of voices warning robots will take away our jobs, it is clear we are focusing more on the problems of AI, robotics, and automation than the solutions. While the problems are real and should be taken into account, social innovators around the world are already working to deliver solutions. It’s true that today’s technology is reworking the economy and our role in it.

LEGAL FUTURES Report: artificial intelligence will cause "structural collapse" of law firms by 2030 1 December 2014 AI: computers that ‘think’ spell doom for many lawyers Robots and artificial intelligence (AI) will dominate legal practice within 15 years, perhaps leading to the “structural collapse” of law firms, a report predicting the shape of the legal market has envisaged. Civilisation 2030: The near future for law firms, by Jomati Consultants, foresees a world in which population growth is actually slowing, with “peak humanity” occurring as early as 2055, and ageing populations bringing a growth in demand for legal work on issues affecting older people. This could mean more advice needed by healthcare and specialist construction companies on the building and financing of hospitals, and on pension investment businesses, as well as financial and regulatory work around the demographic changes to come; more age-related litigation, IP battles between pharmaceutical companies, and around so-called “geriatric-tech” related IP. The human part of lawyering would shrink.

Low wages not education to blame for STEM skills gap Low wages rather than inadequate training are to blame for the STEM skills gap, according to research from the University of Warwick. A new briefing paper suggests that the lack of workers with skills in science, maths, engineering and technology (STEM) and 'soft' communications skills is not due to problems with the education system, but to employers being unwilling to offer higher wages to suitably skilled workers. The research was conducted by Dr Thijs van Rens associate professor in the Department of Economics. He said: "It is often taken for granted that the skills gap and skills mismatch is a supply problem and appropriate training is not available to workers. However US data shows that market wages do not reflect the relative demand for different types of skills. "Businesses complain about the lack of workers with STEM skills but are unwilling to raise wages for these workers -- or reduce wages for workers with skills that are less in demand."

Robot-writing increased AP’s earnings stories by tenfold Since The Associated Press adopted automation technology to write its earnings reports, the news cooperative has generated 3,000 stories per quarter, ten times its previous output, according to a press release from Automated Insights, the company behind the automation. Those stories also contained “far fewer errors” than stories written by actual journalists. The Associated Press began publishing earnings reports using automation technology in July for companies including Hasbro Inc., Honeywell International Inc. and GE. Appended to those stories is a note that reads “This story was generated automatically by Automated Insights ( using data from Zacks Investment Research. Full GE report:

Immagini per uso scolastico ed educativo - Imm. 26872 albero genealogico - Immagini per uso scolastico ed educativo Categoria: Home > immagine La Famiglia > albero genealogico Disegno da colorare, disegni da colorare, disegno, illustrazione, immagine: albero genealogico

cracked First off, fuck the apocalypse and everybody who predicts it. There's always an apocalypse somewhere, and our pop culture's obsession with an America ruined by war/disease/starvation basically boils down to, "Can you imagine if the shit that's constantly happening in the Third World happened to us?" There's somebody out there living the social breakdown of The Walking Dead right now. Only instead of zombies, it's some warlord's death squads, and a crossbow won't do shit. No, this article is about the future, but isn't about the apocalypse or a dystopia -- this isn't about killer robots (which we already have!) or a looming American police state.

Young people 'feel they have nothing to live for' As many as three quarters of a million young people in the UK may feel that they have nothing to live for, a study for the Prince's Trust charity claims. The trust says almost a third of long-term unemployed young people have contemplated taking their own lives. Urgent action must be taken to prevent the young jobless becoming the young hopeless, it says. The government commented that it was doing "everything possible" to help young people find work. Last month, figures from the Office for National Statistics showed the UK unemployment rate had fallen to its lowest level since 2009, with the number of people out of work falling by 99,000 to 2.39 million in the three months to October.

Designa kläder för framtidens yrken? Material, form, funktion, etc? ;) Carls förslag Tänk om Peter kunde dyka upp en lektion?.. by skapasaker Jun 25

Related:  diy