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The Three Questions You Should Ask to Think More Critically

The Three Questions You Should Ask to Think More Critically
"Critical Thinking" is an "obnoxious" term? Boy.I tend to apply it to everything, including Lifehacker articles. :-) Maybe it's my background, but if you present any topic that isn't undisputed common knowledge you should expect some (civil) questions and challenges. If you don't, it means people aren't taking you seriously. As you should! But it's one of those phrases that is said so often that it kind of loses its meaning with people—they see it and gloss right over without realizing the practical implications of what it means.

http://lifehacker.com/the-three-questions-you-should-ask-to-think-more-critic-1575668739

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The Question Game: A Playful Way To Teach Critical Thinking The Question Game by Sophie Wrobel, geist.avesophos.de The Question Game: A Playful Way To Teach Critical Thinking Big idea: Teaching kids to ask smart questions on their own A four-year-old asks on average about 400 questions per day, and an adult hardly asks any.

10 Signs You're A Critical Thinker Critical thinkers are able to analyze issues from a wide variety of angles, resulting in more success in business and life. Discover your ability to think critically today with these ten signs you’re a critical thinker. 1. You get your news from a wide variety of sources. Critical thinkers know that partisan politics come into play at any mainstream media outlet, so they strive to learn about the world from a variety of sources that offer different journalistic voices.

New Report: Technology Can Close Achievement Gaps and Improve Learning Outcomes for At-Risk Students Press Release: New Report: Technology Can Close Achievement Gaps and Improve Learning Outcomes for At-Risk Students Report Identifies Key Strategies to Successful Technology Implementation WASHINGTON, DC – As school districts around the country consider investing in technology as a way to improve student outcomes, a new report from the Alliance for Excellent Education and the Stanford Center for Opportunity Policy in Education (SCOPE) finds that technology—when implemented properly—can produce significant gains in student achievement and boost engagement, particularly among students most at risk.

How Questions Promote Cognitive, Social, and Emotional Learning Across Subject Areas In the last blog, we took a look at the perspective of perspective of Irving Sigel on the importance of asking different kinds of questions as a way of deepening students' social, emotional, and cognitive learning. Coming from a Piaget approach, Irv felt that students needed to go from understanding the material as presented to generating their own thoughts about it. He referred to this as "distancing" -- not the clearest term, but a way of saying that questions could be sequenced toward leading to students' higher order and constructivist thinking by having them take a range of perspectives about a given reading or topic. Continuing with our example using the children's story, "Goldilocks and the Three Bears," you can see below the wide range of questions that can help children think of even a simple story in ways that promote many different kinds and levels of thinking: Low Level Distancing Medium Level Distancing

An Abbreviated Glossary of Critical Thinking Concepts and Terms critical thinking: Everybody thinks; it is our nature to do so. But much of our thinking left to itself, is biased, distorted, partial, uninformed, or down-right prejudiced. Shoddy thinking is costly, both in money and in quality of life. Excellence in thought through critical thinking must be systematically cultivated. A well-cultivated critical thinker: raises vital questions and problems, formulating them clearly and precisely; gathers and assesses relevant information, using abstract ideas to interpret it effectively; comes to well-reasoned conclusions and solutions, testing them against relevant criteria and standards; thinks open-mindedly within alternative systems of thought, recognizing and assessing, as need be their assumptions, implications, and consequences; and communicates effectively with others figuring out solutions to complex problems.

Nine of the Best Ways to Boost Creative Thinking When it comes to creativity, one of our biggest concerns is usually how we can be more creative, or how to come up with better ideas. Research in this area is all over the place, but I’ve gathered some of the most practical studies out there to help you utilize specific techniques that can boost your creativity. All of these studies are useful for everyday creativity in daily life, so try a few out for yourself and see which ones work best for you. 38 Question Starters based on Bloom’s Taxonomy - Curriculet Curriculet is free for teachers and students. Get started here. This is the 2nd post in a series on how to write better curriculets (and literacy curriculum). Outline of thought Nature of thought[edit] Thought (or thinking) can be described as all of the following: An activity taking place in a: brain – organ that serves as the center of the nervous system in all vertebrate and most invertebrate animals (only a few invertebrates such as sponges, jellyfish, adult sea squirts and starfish do not have a brain). It is the physical structure associated with the mind. mind – abstract entity with the cognitive faculties of consciousness, perception, thinking, judgement, and memory. Having a mind is a characteristic of humans, but which also may apply to other life forms.[1][2] Activities taking place in a mind are called mental processes or cognitive functions.computer (see automated reasoning, below) – general purpose device that can be programmed to carry out a set of arithmetic or logical operations automatically. Types of thoughts[edit]

Do Less Of This & More Of This In Your School Staff Meeting Boring School Staff Meeting? Here Are Some Ideas For many of us, snow did this to us—pushing end-of-the-school-year proceedings until mid to late June. 25 Question Stems Framed Around Bloom's Taxonomy 25 Question Stems Framed Around Bloom’s Taxonomy While critical thinking is a foundation rather than a brick, how you build that foundation depends on the learning process itself: exposing students to new thinking and promoting interaction with that thinking in a gradual release of responsibility approach. Question stems can be a powerful part of that process no matter where the learner is. Assessment (pre-assessment, self-assessment, formative and summative assessment), prompting and cueing during discussion, etc. In that light, the following 25+ question stems framed around the early, non-revised Bloom’s Taxonomy are worth a gander. Image attribution flickr enokson; 25 Question Stems Framed Around Bloom’s Taxonomy

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