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The 5 Step Model to Teach Students Critical Thinking Skills

The 5 Step Model to Teach Students Critical Thinking Skills
May 11, 2014 One of our priorities as teachers and educators is to cultivate a culture of critical thinking within our classrooms. Such an endeavour ,while possible and doable, does take so much planning and efforts. I am talking here about efforts from both teachers and students, and on a larger scale curriculum designers as well. Critical thinking is a cognitive skill that can be developed through a well-planned instructional process. This process, according to Duran et al. (2006) requires five fundamental steps: 1- Determine learning objectives This is the initial phase where you need to identify the behaviours you want your students to exhibit and work on encapsulating these behaviours in an overarching higher order thinking schema. 2-Teach through questioning The importance of integrating questions into instruction is uncontested. 3-Practice before you assess This is where hands-on learning activities are called for. Thanks to Teachthought where I learned about this visual.

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7 Tenets of Creative Thinking In school, we learn about geniuses and their ideas, but how did they get those ideas? What are the mental processes, attitudes, work habits, behaviors, and beliefs that enable creative geniuses to view the same things as the rest of us, yet see something different? The following are seven principles that I've learned during my lifetime of work in the field of creative thinking -- things that I wish I'd been taught as a student. 1. You Are Creative Artists are not special, but each of us is a special kind of artist who enters the world as a creative and spontaneous thinker. 6 Steps to Help Students Find Order in Their Thinking Like magic, the fish turn into birds and then back into fish. M.C. Escher's tessellations have a way of grabbing your attention and forcing your mind to make sense of the impossible figures on the paper. The Merriam dictionary describes tessellations as, "a covering of an infinite geometric plane without gaps or overlaps by congruent plane figures of one type or a few types." A geometry book I have on hand describes tessellations as geometric forms that make use of all available foreground and background space in two dimensions by repeating one or more different shapes in predictable patterns.

Reflective Reports – how to write 1st class reflective reports Reflective Reports are a common assignment in UK universities. Unlike traditional essays and presentations, the Reflective Report gives students a chance to highlight their own experiences and opinions in an academic setting. Reflective Reports need to contain a good level of critical analysis, but they can also be fun and useful for students. What Is a Reflective Report? As the name suggests, a Reflective Report is a piece of writing that summarises a student’s critical reflection on a subject.

Types of Plagiarism — Plagiarism.org - Best Practices for Ensuring Originality in Written Work Plagiarism is not always a black and white issue. The boundary between plagiarism and research is often unclear. Learning to recognize the various forms of plagiarism, especially the more ambiguous ones, is an important step towards effective prevention. The Plagiarism Spectrum was developed as a way to define and distinguish the common ways in which plagiarism can take form. The Spectrum makes these forms memorable by tagging the types with “Digital 2.0” monikers, a gesture that both acknowledges the role that the internet plays in instances of content copying and makes the types more meaningful for a generation of writers who are “digital natives.”1 As part of the Plagiarism Spectrum project, a May 2012 survey of nearly 900 secondary and higher education instructors was also conducted to assess the frequency with which these types appear as well as the degree to which each type is problematic for instructors.

Resources and Downloads for Teaching Critical Thinking Tips for downloading: PDF files can be viewed on a wide variety of platforms -- both as a browser plug-in or a stand-alone application -- with Adobe's free Acrobat Reader program. Click here to download the latest version of Adobe Reader. Click on any title link below to view or download that file. Resources On This Page: Lesson Plans & Rubrics Two Great Classroom Posters on The Six Thinking Hats July 17, 2014The Six Thinking Hats is a book written by Edward de Bono in which he lays out a practical method that expands on the very simple concept of thinking. Since its publication a decade ago, several teachers and educators worldwide have adopted Edward's thinking approach with success. The Six Thinking Hats can be used with students in class to enhance their thinking and decision making skills. For De Bono intelligence is the potential of the human brain and thinking is the skill to tap into this potential.

The Importance Of Critical Thinking Source: www.eftbrisbane.com | Original Post Date: January 3, 2009 - Critical thinking is an incredibly important skill. We use this skill (or ought to) in every aspect of our lives every single day. Although it’s an important part of academic and business success, it’s not often taught at school unless it’s part of a math, science, or business curriculum. The basic definition of critical thinking is the ability to take information and make informed decisions without being influenced by your own opinions.

write - Reflective writing What is reflective writing? Good reflective writing usually involves four key elements: reporting and responding to a critical issue or experience; relating this issue or experience to your own knowledge in this field; reasoning about causes and effects of this issue/experience according to relevant theories or literature and/or similarities or differences with other experiences you've had; and reconstructing your thinking to plan new ways to approach the issue or engage in similar experiences in the future For more detail, see the 4Rs framework [130KB].

Podcast: Gender Roles Podcast: Gender Roles Whose job is it to take out the trash in your family? Is there such a thing as “pink jobs” and “blue jobs”? Are traditional gender roles a thing of the past? In many countries, dual-income households are now the norm. Useful links for CELTA Anyone following my blog will know that CELTA took over my life in August last year (2014), and will continue to dominate until the same time this year (2015). I’ve been building this list in my head for a while, and it’s finally time to get it onto the blog. It’s arranged into categories, with subtitles and topics in bold to help you navigate. There’s a lot here, so just use the bits you need as you need them rather than trying to look at all of them – if not, you’ll end up being overwhelmed! A quick way to find what you need it to press CTRL + F (CMD + F on a Mac) and type a key word connected to what you’re struggling with, like ‘TTT’, ‘instructions’ or ‘writing’ – this will take you straight to the relevant section. Please let me know if any of the links are broken so I can update them, and feel free to add suggestions to the comments.

Critical Thinking Pathways Critical thinking is trendy these days. With 6.3 million hits resulting from a Google search -- six times "Bloom's Taxonomy" -- its importance is undeniable. Worldwide, critical thinking (CT) is integrated into finger-painting lessons, units on Swiss immigrants, discussions of Cinderella, and the Common Core State Standards. In short, critical thinking is more beloved than Egyptian cotton. Definitions abound. Using Webb's Depth of Knowledge to Increase Rigor The word "rigor" is hard to avoid today, and it provokes strong reactions from educators. Policymakers tout its importance. Publishers promote it as a feature of their materials. But some teachers share the view of Joanne Yatvin, past president of the National Council for Teachers of English.

Online Guides: Descriptive, Analytical, Critical/Evaluative, Reflective Writing Compared How do I Make my Writing Descriptive, Analytical, Critical/Evaluative or Reflective? Assignment instructions outline how to address an assignment topic and indicate which of the following writing styles is expected. The following model shows questions you need to ask of your research to help you think and then write in the appropriate style. Figure 1. Model to Generate Critical Thinking (from Hilsdon, 2010, p. 2) Think and write in the appropriate style

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