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The 5 Step Model to Teach Students Critical Thinking Skills

The 5 Step Model to Teach Students Critical Thinking Skills

Reflective Reports – how to write 1st class reflective reports Reflective Reports are a common assignment in UK universities. Unlike traditional essays and presentations, the Reflective Report gives students a chance to highlight their own experiences and opinions in an academic setting. Reflective Reports need to contain a good level of critical analysis, but they can also be fun and useful for students. What Is a Reflective Report? As the name suggests, a Reflective Report is a piece of writing that summarises a student’s critical reflection on a subject. How Is a Reflective Report Different from Other Types of Academic Assignment? The reflective report is different from traditional assignments because it allows students to explore their own experiences and viewpoints. What Does a Reflective Report Normally Contain? The contents of the Reflective Report will vary according to the discipline, but it typically provides an overview of the practical project and a thorough account of its progression. • What did you learn? • What did you do and feel?

reflective_writing_151211_copy1.pdf QUT cite|write - Reflective writing What is reflective writing? Good reflective writing usually involves four key elements: reporting and responding to a critical issue or experience; relating this issue or experience to your own knowledge in this field; reasoning about causes and effects of this issue/experience according to relevant theories or literature and/or similarities or differences with other experiences you've had; and reconstructing your thinking to plan new ways to approach the issue or engage in similar experiences in the future For more detail, see the 4Rs framework [130KB]. Why do we write reflectively? Reflecting on an experience involves drawing on current understandings to think deeply and purposefully about what can be learned from the experience. This form of writing is a process where you can learn from your experiences and connect theory with practice in your professional field or discipline. How to write reflectively 1. Recount the experience or issue on which you have chosen to reflect. 2. 3. 4.

Online Guides: Descriptive, Analytical, Critical/Evaluative, Reflective Writing Compared How do I Make my Writing Descriptive, Analytical, Critical/Evaluative or Reflective? Assignment instructions outline how to address an assignment topic and indicate which of the following writing styles is expected. The following model shows questions you need to ask of your research to help you think and then write in the appropriate style. Figure 1. Think and write in the appropriate style Use the following questions to help you think and then write in the appropriate style, or move your writing from one style to another. (Adapted from “Critical Thinking,” 2010; “Reflective Writing,” n.d.) Useful words and phrases for each writing style These phrases and words may be helpful. These phrases and words may be helpful. Writing style characteristics Use the following chart to assess your writing and identify changes required to ensure your writing reflects the appropriate style. (Adapted from “Critical Thinking,” 2010; “Features of Critical Writing,” 2008; “Reflective Writing,” n.d.) Reference

Genres in Academic Writing: Reflective writing The purpose of reflective writing is to help you learn from a particular practical experience. It will help you to make connections between what you are taught in theory and what you need to do in practice. You reflect so that you can learn. In reflective writing, you are trying to write down some of the thinking that you have been through while carrying out a particular practical activity, such as writing an essay, teaching a class or selling a product. Through reflection, you should be able to make sense of what you did and why and perhaps help yourself to do it better next time. You might reflect for many reasons in many ways, for example, in a diary or personal log. Reflective writing gives you the chance think about what you are doing more deeply and to learn from your experience. You might want to or be asked to reflect on: In your reflection, you could write about: Reflective writing often involves an action plan in which you should write about: Back to Introduction

Resources and Downloads for Teaching Critical Thinking Tips for downloading: PDF files can be viewed on a wide variety of platforms -- both as a browser plug-in or a stand-alone application -- with Adobe's free Acrobat Reader program. Click here to download the latest version of Adobe Reader. Click on any title link below to view or download that file. Resources On This Page: Lesson Plans & Rubrics KIPP King Curriculum Planning Guide <img height="12" width="11" class="media-image media-element file-content-image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/content_image_breakpoints_theme_edutopia_desktop_1x/public/content/08/pdficon.gif? Back to Top Tools for Critical Thinking Scope and Sequence, Speech and Composition <img alt="" title="" class="media-image" width="11" height="12" src="/sites/default/files/styles/content_image_breakpoints_theme_edutopia_desktop_1x/public/content/08/pdficon.gif? Culture at KIPP

Teaching Adolescents How to Evaluate the Quality of Online Information An essential part of online research is the ability to critically evaluate information. This includes the ability to assess its level of accuracy, reliability, and bias. In 2012, my colleagues and I assessed 770 seventh graders in two states to study these areas, and the results definitely got our attention. Unfortunately, over 70 percent of the students’ responses suggested that: Middle school students are more concerned with content relevance than with credibility They rarely attend to source features such as author, venue, or publication type to evaluate reliability and author perspective When they do refer to source features in their explanations, their judgments are often vague, superficial, and lacking in reasoned justification Other studies highlight similar shortcomings of high school and college students in these areas (see, for example, a 2016 study from Stanford). So what can you do to more explicitly teach adolescents how to evaluate the quality of online information?

Writing forCollege Chapter 49: CASE STUDY What is a "case study" and what are its uses? Introduction: What Is a Case Study? Two Formal Patterns for Case Studies Informal Patterns: Observing and Profiling Standards for Writing a Case Study Conclusion Samples (on separate web page) Introduction: What Is a Case Study? This chapter briefly presents the "case study." A case study is a specialized type of paper used in some social sciences, medical, legal, and other fields. A case study usually describes the problem or illness of a patient or client, and it details a system or therapy for helping that patient. (a) the background of a problem(b) the problem itself(c) a plan for solving the problem(d) the application of the solution(e) the result Return to top. Two Formal Patterns for Case Studies Here are two different patterns for a formal case study. Case Study of an Individual: There are many different versions of case studies in different disciplines and different professions. person (client/patient) Conclusion

QUT cite|write - Writing a case study response What is a case study ? A case study is a description of a real life problem or situation which requires you to analyse the main issues involved. These issues need to be discussed and related to the academic literature and/or research findings on the topic and conclusions then drawn about why the situation occurred and how best to respond to it. Why do we write case study responses? A case study is a way to apply the theoretical knowledge gained from the academic literature to real life situations that you may encounter in your work. Writing a case study response enables you to analyse the issues in a real life situation, apply the knowledge gained from your academic reading and research and draw conclusions about how to respond as a professional to that situation. How to write a case study response A case study response would include the following elements: Introduction Introduce the main purpose of the case study and briefly outline the overall problem to be solved. Description Discussion

How To Teach All Students To Think Critically All first year students at the University of Technology Sydney could soon be required to take a compulsory maths course in an attempt to give them some numerical thinking skills. The new course would be an elective next year and mandatory in 2016 with the university’s deputy vice-chancellor for education and students Shirley Alexander saying the aim is to give students some maths “critical thinking” skills. This is a worthwhile goal, but what about critical thinking in general? Most tertiary institutions have listed among their graduate attributes the ability to think critically. The problem is that critical thinking is the Cheshire Cat of educational curricula – it is hinted at in all disciplines but appears fully formed in none. If you ask curriculum designers exactly how critical thinking skills are developed, the answers are often vague and unhelpful for those wanting to teach it. So what should any mandatory first year course in critical thinking look like? 1. 2. 3. 4. Values

25 Question Stems Framed Around Bloom's Taxonomy 25 Question Stems Framed Around Bloom’s Taxonomy While critical thinking is a foundation rather than a brick, how you build that foundation depends on the learning process itself: exposing students to new thinking and promoting interaction with that thinking in a gradual release of responsibility approach. Question stems can be a powerful part of that process no matter where the learner is. Assessment (pre-assessment, self-assessment, formative and summative assessment), prompting and cueing during discussion, etc. In that light, the following 25+ question stems framed around the early, non-revised Bloom’s Taxonomy are worth a gander. Image attribution flickr enokson; 25 Question Stems Framed Around Bloom’s Taxonomy

Guidelines on writing a research proposal by Matthew McGranaghan This is a work in progress, intended to organize my thoughts on the process of formulating a proposal. If you have any thoughts on the contents, or on the notion of making this available to students, please share them with me. Thanks. Introduction This is a guide to writing M.A. research proposals. Proposal Writing Proposal writing is important to your pursuit of a graduate degree. The objective in writing a proposal is to describe what you will do, why it should be done, how you will do it and what you expect will result. A good thesis proposal hinges on a good idea. Proposals help you estimate the size of a project. Different Theses, Similar Proposals This guide includes an outline that looks like a "fill-in the blanks model" and, while in the abstract all proposals are similar, each proposal will have its own particular variation on the basic theme. Characterizing theses is difficult. In the abstract all proposals are very similar. A Couple of Models for Proposals

Writing a Research Proposal What is a proposal? A proposal is a request for support of sponsored research, instruction, or extension projects. Good proposals quickly and easily answer the following questions: What do you want to do, how much will it cost, and how much time will it take? These questions will be answered in different ways and receive different emphases depending on the nature of the proposed project and on the agency to which the proposal is being submitted. Types of proposals Solicited proposals Submitted in response to a specific solicitation issued by a sponsor. Unsolicited proposals Submitted to a sponsor that has not issued a specific solicitation but is believed by the investigator to have an interest in the subject. Preproposals Requested when a sponsor wishes to minimize an applicant's effort in preparing a full proposal. Continuation or non-competing proposals Renewal or competing proposals Parts of a proposal Must-have resources Proposal Writing Assistance at the University of Illinois Writing Guides

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