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8 Ideas That Will Permanently Break Education As We Know It

8 Ideas That Will Permanently Break Education As We Know It
9 Ideas Education Is Having Trouble Responding To by Terry Heick Ed note: This post has been updated from a post we published this summer. As education changes, it depends primarily on internal catalysts for that change. That is, the “things” that change it are on the “inside” of that system itself, most notably data, assessment, PLCs, and running a distant fourth, technology. It’s interesting that technology is among the least impacting “agents of change” in the classroom. At some point, this will change. 1. Or rather usurping it in terms of sheer credibility. Businesses, education institutes, groups, organizations, people—everyone wants visibility and access. What do I know, and what should I do with what I know? How can I use those things I am connected to and with to live the kind of life I want to live? Knowledge will always matter, but in an economic sense of supply and demand, information is boundless. 2. 3. 4. Think about YouTube. 5. 6. “Mobile” isn’t a buzzword, it’s the future.

http://www.teachthought.com/trends/disrupting-education-8-ideas-will-break/

Related:  Emerging Trends. EDUT 522. Assignment 1Future LearningFurther ReadingInglés

How Teaching Is Changing: 15 Examples How Teaching Is Changing: 15 New Realities Every Educator Faces by Terry Heick It’s tempting to say that no matter how much technology pushes on education, every teacher will always need to know iconic teacher practices like assessment, curriculum design, classroom management, and cognitive coaching.

6 Emerging Trends in Education and Mobile Learning Steve Vosloo At the UNESCO Mobile Learning Week 2014 I sat on a panel titled Emerging Trends and New Technology – considered in the context of mobile learning. Below are the notes of the key points that I made. Note: The issue of Emerging Trends and New Technology begs the question: for who? For students in California, or for those in Kolkata? Developed country trends are very different from developing country trends.

Never Too Young To Code Kindergartners use Bee-Bots to explore coding and mapping skills at the Cook SchoolPhotos courtesy of Catherine Cook School As with other aspects of tech use in early childhood, deep discussions are underway about the appropriate role coding has in young children’s classrooms—and in the library. Sometimes referred to as the “new literacy” in schools, teaching coding means teaching children the language used to operate tablets, computers, and other devices they interact with every day. Experts say these beginning programming skills teach problem-solving and critical thinking and expose children to the world of computer science. 50 Crazy Ideas To Change Education 50 Crazy Ideas To Change Education by Terry Heick Below are 50 ideas for a new education. Note, most of these are about education as a system rather than learning itself, but that’s okay.

7 Ed Tech Trends to Watch in 2014 Technology trends in both higher ed and K-12 classrooms continue to evolve and transform traditional learning environments. New learning analytics, mobile devices, open online learning, and 3D printers are some of the many Educational technology trends to be on the lookout for in 2014. Here’s a detailed discussion. 9 Elephants in the (Class)Room That Should “Unsettle” Us — Modern Learning “When I really try to square what I believe about how kids learn and what we practice in our classrooms, it unsettles me.” A t a recent morning workshop for school leaders at a fairly small New England public school district, about an hour into a conversation focused on what they believed about how kids learn best, an assistant superintendent somewhat surprisingly said aloud what many in the room were no doubt feeling. “When I really try to square what I believe about how kids learn and what we practice in our classrooms, it unsettles me,” she said.

6 Tips for Getting Started with Genius Hour Posted 05/22/2014 2:36PM | Last Commented 02/02/2015 11:36AM Genius hour is a great way to allow students to drive their own personalized instruction but where to begin such a big project? How to Get Started

20 Questions To Guide Inquiry-Based Learning 20 Questions To Guide Inquiry-Based Learning Recently we took at look at the phases of inquiry-based learning through a framework, and even apps that were conducive to inquiry-based learning on the iPad. During our research for the phases framework, we stumbled across the following breakdown of the inquiry process for learning on 21stcenturyhsie.weebly.com (who offer the references that appear below the graphic). Most helpfully, it offers 20 questions that can guide student research at any stage, including: What do I want to know about this topic?

Better teachers? Better at what, exactly? Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Schools take legal action against bully parents Principal Henry Grossek tells 3AW that his school isn't among those getting lawyers to write letters but he understands how things can get out of hand on social media. We Need Schools... Not Factories Winner Of the TED Prize 2013 In a special edition of TEDWeekends, TED and The Huffington Post are partnering to co-premiere a talk by this year's TED Prize winner. The TEDTalk by the winner is accompanied by an original blog post, along with new op-eds, thoughts and responses from the HuffPost and TED communities. Watch the talk above, read the blog post and tell us your thoughts below. Become part of the conversation! The Sole Of A Student

The Inside-Out School: A 21st Century Learning Model The Inside-Out School: A 21st Century Learning Model by Terry Heick As a follow-up to our 9 Characteristics of 21st Century Learning we developed in 2009, we have developed an updated framework, The Inside-Out Learning Model. The goal of the model is simple enough–not pure academic proficiency, but instead authentic self-knowledge, diverse local and global interdependence, adaptive critical thinking, and adaptive media literacy. 7 Games to Inspire a Child's Love for Reading Second and third grade students are showing a growing affinity for tablets, phone, and other tech gadgets, but this exposure to technology comes at a price: Although more and more kids have access to gadgets, their reading levels are dropping. Kids are swapping out reading for video games and Netflix as their main sources of entertainment. If you’re worried about your little one’s literacy, have no fear! There are a number of reading games and apps that will engage your tech-savvy child and help them become avid readers. These games span multiple grade-levels and learning types so you can find the best reading resource to suit your child. Text-based Role-playing Games

What Would Be a Radically Different Vision of School? There’s no shortage of different opinions about how the education system should adapt to a shifting world and a future with unknown demands, but for the most part, only two dominant narratives of education reform have emerged. “The predominant narrative is that schools are broken,” said veteran educator and author Will Richardson recently at a gathering of teachers at Educon. “Our test scores aren’t great and kids aren’t learning what they need to be successful.”

Creating Classrooms We Need: 8 Ways Into Inquiry Learning If kids can access information from sources other than school, and if school is no longer the only place where information lives, what, then happens to the role of this institution? “Our whole reason for showing up for school has changed, but infrastructure has stayed behind,” said Diana Laufenberg, who taught history at the progressive public school Science Leadership Academy for many years. Laufenberg provided some insight into how she guided students to find their own learning paths at school, and enumerated some of these ideas at SXSWEdu last week. 1. BE FLEXIBLE.

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