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A Treasure Trove of Digital Citizenship Resources for Teachers

A Treasure Trove of Digital Citizenship Resources for Teachers
May 8, 2014 With the increasing use of internet by our kids comes the risks that, if not addressed appropriately, would make this use disastrous. From online predators looming around waiting for their next victim to harassment and cyberbullying, these and several other issues are waiving a red flag for parents, teachers,and education stakeholders to take an immediate action and make digital citizenship an essential component in the curriculum. Kids need to be aware of these risks and should be taught on how to surf the net safely. There is a special section here in Educational Technology and Mobile Learning where I have aggregated a plethora of resources that teachers can use with their students to teach them about digital citizenship. And today I come across these wonderful resources compiled by Taryn Degnan from Common Sense Media. I thought about tweeting the link without having to share it here but I know thousands of email and RSS Feed subscribers would miss it.

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/05/a-treasure-trove-of-digital-citizenship.html

Related:  Instructional Tech ResourcesDigital CitizenshipResource LinksDigital Citizenship

How to Integrate Tech When It Keeps Changing Asking if technology enhances learning is like asking if dogs are playful. Whether we're discussing tech or those furry mouth-breathers, the answer is the same: it depends on the situation. Here's a better line of inquiry: how do you coordinate knowledge, instructional practices, and technologies in order to positively influence academic achievement? We can begin to answer this question with the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge Framework (TPACK), which conceptualizes the integration of "Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK), Technological Content Knowledge (TCK), Technological Pedagogical Knowledge (TPK), and the intersection of all three," explains Dr. Matthew Koehler, editor of tpack.org. Watch (and feel free to share) the "TPACK in 2 Minutes" video below:

10 Tips for Cyber Smartness and Safety I have recently started a series of posts here in Educational Technology and Mobile Learning featuring a set of interesting resources and tips for teachers to start a successful techy new school year. If you want to have a look at what we have already posted, check out this resource section. Today and as I was working on an article about cyber safety - which I will publish tomorrow-, I came across this handy guide outlining top ten tips for kids to stay safe online. The guide is created by AFP ( Australian Federal Police ) and is really ideal to use with our students in class.

Mathematics, Learning and Technology Coming across You’re Getting Old, it struck me that the numbers generated by the site would be perfect for standard form exercises; put in a student’s date of birth and even the young ones will have some big numbers reported! For example, for a 12 year old, the following figures are generated, some updated while you watch. You’re getting old! Some other resources for standard form: Copyright Flowchart: Can I Use It? Yes? No? If This… Then… It is the responsibility of all educators to model good digital citizenship for their students. Especially when it comes to copyright, plagiarism and intellectual property. The waters are murky. Not being familiar with online digital rights and responsibilities (hey, teachers did not grow up with the Internet being around), educators are wading through uncharted waters (hey, I did not know that I could not just google an image to use. If someone puts it up online it is free for the taking).

Four Skills to Teach Students In the First Five Days of School Jane Mount/MindShift The first few days of school are a vital time to set the right tone for the rest of the year. Many teachers focus on important things like getting to know their students, building relationships and making sure students know what the classroom procedures will be. Infographic: Are You Revealing Too Much on Social Networks? Social-networking sites are a hacker's dream: a sometimes public online community where unsuspecting people post personal information. But what information can and should be posted on social networks? Cloud security firm Trend Micro examined popular social networks like Facebook, Twitter, Google+, Tumblr, LinkedIn, and Pinterest and found that most require identifying information like location, employment, birthday, and education.

Common Craft Cut-outs: Now Available Individually Visuals play an important role in how we communicate, but nice looking digital images can be a pain to find or create. That's a big reason we offer Common Craft Cut-outs - to provide a library of over 1,600 downloadable images that can be used in projects like presentations, blog posts and videos. Until recently, our Cut-outs were only available through Common Craft membership (starting at $49 per year). Today, all Cut-outs are also available individually. High resolution PNG images are $0.99 and EPS vectors graphics are $1.49. Just click on Cut-outs in the library, add them to the shopping cart and they'll be available for download immediately after purchase.

Responsible Search Strategies for Kids The Internet has given kids unprecedented access to information and entertainment. All they need to do is search for something, and it arrives -- often unfiltered, age-inappropriate, or totally irrelevent. You can keep them in a safe zone using kid-safe browsers and search sites and reference and research tools. But along with good search skills it's important to teach kids how to use the powerful tools at their fingertips responsibly. Follow these guidelines:

USC Creates Research-Based Educational Games Gaming | News USC Creates Research-Based Educational Games Researchers at the University of Southern California's (USC) Game Innovation Lab and Rossier School of Education have developed research-based educational games for classroom use. While many games on the market claim to be educational, not all of them are research-based or proven to be pedagogically effective. USC researchers strive to create games that are engaging for students while also ensuring that the games achieve the educational goals the developers set out to meet. 10 Interactive Lessons By Google On Digital Citizenship YouTube has a firm place in the current classroom. From Khan Academy’s videos to YouTube EDU and beyond, there’s a reason all these videos are finding a home in schools. In an effort to help keep the ball rolling, Google just launched a set of 10 interactive lessons designed to support teachers in educating students on digital citizenship. A topic obviously quite close to Google’s heart. Google (which owns YouTube) built the lessons to educate students about YouTube’s policies, how to flag content, how to be a safer online citizen, and protect their identities. Below is a list of lessons, and the recommended flow for delivery.

Essay Map-A Handy Interactive Graphic Organizer to Help Students with Essay Writing August 18, 2014 Essay Map is one of my favourite web tools that I have been repeatedly recommending for teachers. Essay Map, as its name indicates, is a tool that helps students with their essay writings. It is an interactive graphic organizer that provides students with a step by step guidance through the process of developing a robust outline to their essays. Digital Citizenship Resources to get you started Resources in the area of digital citizenship have proliferated exponentially in the last few years. Here are a few places to help you get started: Digital Community, Digital Citizen, (Corwin Press, 2011).

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