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Hayward Gallery

Hayward Gallery
See all events taking place in Hayward Gallery Hayward Gallery has a long history of presenting work by the world's most adventurous and innovative artists. For free entry to all exhibitions become a Southbank Centre Member. Opened by Her Majesty The Queen in 1968, it is an outstanding example of sixties brutalist architecture and is one of the few remaining buildings of this style. It was designed by a group of young architects, including Dennis Crompton, Warren Chalk and Ron Herron. Hayward Gallery is named after the late Sir Isaac Hayward, the former leader of the London County Council. Upcoming Exhibition Our next exhibition is History Is Now: 7 Artists Take On Britain (Tue 10 Feb 2015–Sun 26 Apr 2015 ). Opening times Monday 12 noon – 6pm Tuesday, Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday 11am – 7pm Thursday and Friday 11am – 8pm Tickets Prices include a small voluntary donation in support of Hayward Gallery. Book Tickets Groups Supporting Southbank Centre

http://www.southbankcentre.co.uk/venues/hayward-gallery

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