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Ancient Egypt

Ancient Egypt
The tomb of King Tutankhamun was found almost entirely intact in 1922. This headdress, placed over the mummified head of the deceased king in 1343 B.C.E., is made entirely of gold. Hieroglyphics, pyramids, mummies, the Sphinx of Giza, King Tut, and Cleopatra. The sands of the Nile River Valley hold many clues about one of the most mysterious, progressive, and artistic ancient civilizations. A great deal of evidence survives about how the ancient Egyptians lived, but questions remain. Even the wise sphinx would have trouble answering some of them. In De-Nile The Nile Valley was the seat of an ancient Egyptian civilization that spanned over 4,000 years. In 3,000 B.C.E., Egypt looked similar geographically to the way it looks today. The Nile is the longest river in the world; it flows northward for nearly 4,200 miles. Egyptians artisans smelted copper and gold for artistic, architectural, and even military purposes. The road to civilization required more organization and increased efficiency. Related:  Ancient EgyptAncient EgyptAncient Egypt

Ancient Egypt - Ancient History Under Ahmose I, the first king of the 18th dynasty, Egypt was once again reunited. During the 18th dynasty, Egypt restored its control over Nubia and began military campaigns in Palestine, clashing with other powers in the area such as the Mitannians and the Hittites. The country went on to establish the world’s first great empire, stretching from Nubia to the Euphrates River in Asia. In addition to powerful kings such as Amenhotep I (1546-1526 B.C.), Thutmose I (1525-1512 B.C.) and Amenhotep III (1417-1379 B.C.), the New Kingdom was notable for the role of royal women such as Queen Hatshepsut (1503-1482 B.C.), who began ruling as a regent for her young stepson (he later became Thutmose III, Egypt’s greatest military hero), but rose to wield all the powers of a pharaoh. All of the New Kingdom rulers (with the exception of Akhenaton) were laid to rest in deep, rock-cut tombs (not pyramids) in the Valley of the Kings, a burial site on the west bank of the Nile opposite Thebes.

Solved! How Ancient Egyptians Moved Massive Pyramid Stones Researchers have traced how cells in our retina track objects that move across our field of vision, thanks in part to thousands of video gamers. The findings, published online Sunday by the journal Nature, validate a concept that explains how some nerve cells are stimulated only by motion in a specific direction and not in other directions. They also validate the use of video games, crowdsourcing and the other tools of citizen science for making rigorous scientific discoveries. "You no longer have to have a Ph.D. in neuroscience," said Amy Robinson, creative director for the EyeWire neuro-gaming venture, which contributed to the study. "You could be a high-school student, or a sculptor, a dental assistant or retiree. More than 120,000 EyeWire gamers ("EyeWirers") from more than 100 countries have signed up to play online video games in which they trace 3-D representations of neural wiring. Alex Norton / EyeWire / MIT Mapping the retina How our motion detector works EyeWire

Discovering Ancient Egypt BBC History: The Story of the Nile NOVA | Explore Ancient Egypt Explore Ancient Egypt With 360-degree and other imagery, walk around the Sphinx, enter the Great Pyramid, visit tombs and temples, and more. Want to walk around the Sphinx? Clamber inside the Great Pyramid of Giza and seek out the pharaoh's burial chamber? Visit the magnificent tombs and temples of ancient Thebes? View From Top You are now standing atop Khufuí­s Pyramid, 45 stories above the Giza Plateau. Other things to look for as you navigate around the summit are the Sphinx, Khufu's three Queens' Pyramids, greater Cairo, and—hard to miss—Khafre's Pyramid. Descending Passage Length: 192 feetWidth: 3.5 feetHeight: 4 feetAfter ducking into the Great Pyramid at its entrance 55 feet up its northern face, you begin working your way carefully down the Descending Passage. Subterranean Chamber Length: 46 feet (planned)Width: 24 feet (planned)Height: 17.5 feet (planned)This unfinished chamber, lying nearly 100 feet below the surface of the Giza Plateau, is closed to the public. Ascending Passage

Ancient Egypt Historical Setting THE ROOTS OF EGYPTIAN civilization go back more than 6,000 years to the beginning of settled life along the banks of the Nile River. The country has an unusual geographical and cultural unity that has given the Egyptian people a strong sense of identity and a pride in their heritage as descendants of humankind's earliest civilized community. Within the long sweep of Egyptian history, certain events or epochs have been crucial to the development of Egyptian society and culture. The ancient Egyptians were the first people of antiquity to believe in life after death. The Predynastic Period and the First and Second Dynasties, 6000-2686 B.C. During this period, when people first began to settle along the banks of the Nile (Nahr an Nil) and to evolve from hunters and gatherers to settled, subsistence agriculturalists, Egypt developed the written language, religion, and institutions that made it the world's first organized society. The pharaoh ruled by divine decree.

Carnegie Museum of Natural History: Life in Ancient Egypt Life in Ancient Egypt Welcome to Life in Ancient Egypt, a companion online exhibition to Walton Hall of Ancient Egypt at Carnegie Museum of Natural History. Carnegie Museum of Natural History has acquired Egyptian artifacts since its founding and now holds about twenty-five-hundred ancient Egyptian artifacts. In the hall the artifacts are displayed in relation to the daily life and traditions of the people who made them, so that the objects are seen in the context of the culture. You may choose from the links to the left or follow the suggested path by clicking the Next button on each screen. Fun lesson on Ancient Egypt with plan and resources The opening of Tutankhamun’s tomb: a reconstruction relay The activity that forms the basis of this lesson is called reconstruction relay. It is GUARANTEED to enthuse even the most recalcitrant Y4 boy! Learning objectives pupils experience a sense of awe and wonder at finding these undiscovered ancient richesthey are able to accurately observe and represent in a quick field sketch the objects left in the tomb they work co-operatively in order to generate relevant historical questions Getting Started Use the following steps in conjunction with the provided Downloadable Resources (links shown right) to deliver the lesson. Step 1 The starter for the lesson is an activity called reconstruction relay. To make it really exciting you need to make a few adjustments to the classroom. Firstly, create a long tunnel by placing tables in a long row covered with cloth. Step 2 Pupils work in a team as archaeologists with Carter. Step 3 It is important at this stage NOT to look at their pictures. Step 4 Step 5

NatGeo: King Tut Revealed By A.R. Williams He was just a teenager when he died. The last heir of a powerful family that had ruled Egypt and its empire for centuries, he was laid to rest laden with gold and eventually forgotten. Inside King Tut’s subterranean burial chamber, against a backdrop of sacred murals, Zahi Hawass, head of Egypt’s Supreme Council of Antiquities, removes padding to reveal the young pharaoh’s remains. Clues From Top ... Did the young pharaoh die from a blow to the head? As evidence, they cite an x-ray taken in 1968, which shows a fragment of bone in the skull cavity—emptied by embalmers, according to custom. The maturity of the skeleton and wisdom teeth confirms that Tut was about 19 years old when he died. ... to Bottom About five feet six inches tall (1.7 meters) and slightly built, Tut was in excellent health—well fed and free of any disease that would have affected his physique. Splendor of the Inner Sanctum Guide to the Great Beyond In his defense, Carter really had little choice.

Ancient Egyptian Numbers Egyptian Numbers --- Introduction --- Addition --- Multiplication --- Fractions Enter a number from 1 to 9999999 to see how the Egyptians would have written it, or enter a number to count with. In the Arabic number system, we have ten digits (from 0-9) and we can make as big a number as we want with these. The Egyptians even had this symbol for infinity, which is bigger than any number that's ever been written. The Egyptians would have needed a good number system to build the pyramids. © Jo Edkins 2006 - Return to Numbers index Horus Horus is one of the oldest and most significant deities in ancient Egyptian religion, who was worshipped from at least the late Predynastic period through to Greco-Roman times. Different forms of Horus are recorded in history and these are treated as distinct gods by Egypt specialists.[1] These various forms may possibly be different perceptions of the same multi-layered deity in which certain attributes or syncretic relationships are emphasized, not necessarily in opposition but complementary to one another, consistent with how the Ancient Egyptians viewed the multiple facets of reality.[2] He was most often depicted as a falcon, most likely a lanner or peregrine, or as a man with a falcon head.[3] Etymology[edit] Horus was also known as Nekheny, meaning "falcon". Some have proposed that Nekheny may have been another falcon-god, worshipped at Nekhen (city of the hawk), with which Horus was identified from early on. Note of changes over time[edit] Horus and the pharaoh[edit] Sky god[edit]

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