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The 14 Characteristics of Fascism, by Lawrence Britt, Spring 2003

The 14 Characteristics of Fascism, by Lawrence Britt, Spring 2003
Related:  Personality: Tests, Types, TheoriesGovernance

Nicholas Humphrey:THE EVOLVED SELF-MANAGEMENT SYSTEM I realized it must be the result of a trick that has been played by human culture. The trick isto persuade sick people that they have a "license" to get better, because they'rein the hands of supposed specialists who know what's best for them and can offer practical help and reinforcements. And the reason this works is that it reassures people—subconsciously —that the costs of self-cure will be affordable and that it's safe to let down their guard. I'm now thinking about a larger issue still. Go back 10 or 20,000 years ago. And they still are. Let's take this particular example. Now, to one side of the computer on which subjects were playing this game, the experimenters had set up another computer with a screen-saver on it. But this is just one example. It's been a tremendous surprise for experimental psychology and social psychology, because until now it's been widely assumed that people's characters are in fact pretty much fixed. So what's going on?

Secrecy News The Director of National Intelligence has forbidden most intelligence community employees from discussing “intelligence-related information” with a reporter unless they have specific authorization to do so, according to an Intelligence Community Directive that was issued last month. “IC employees… must obtain authorization for contacts with the media” on intelligence-related matters, and “must also report… unplanned or unintentional contact with the media on covered matters,” the Directive stated. The new Directive reflects — and escalates — tensions between the government and the press over leaks of classified information. It is intended “to mitigate risks of unauthorized disclosures of intelligence-related matters that may result from such contacts.” See Intelligence Community Directive 119, Media Contacts, March 20, 2014. Significantly, however, the new prohibition does not distinguish between classified and unclassified intelligence information.

Create an online store with Goodsie. It's professional, stylish and free to start! 5 Psychological Experiments That Reveal Our Dark Side We present you the most notorious and most popular experiments of all-time. Some of the most fascinating and deplorable experiments ever conducted that proove that we do have a dark side… During the 1950s, Solomon Asch conducted and published a series of laboratory experiments that demonstrated the degree to which an individual’s own opinions are influenced by those of a majority group. Male college students participated in a simple “perceptual” task. Only one participant was actually a genuine subject for the experiment, the rest being confederates, carefully tutored to give certain pre-selected responses. The participants gave a variety of answers, at first correct, to avoid arousing suspicion in the subject, but then with some incorrect responses added. The Asch Experiment results were interesting and showed that peer pressure could have a measurable influence on the answers given. The researchers had three hypotheses: 1. Overall 40% offered some help to the victim. 1.

Boundless Informant Boundless Informant or BOUNDLESSINFORMANT is a big data analysis and data visualization tool used by the United States National Security Agency (NSA). It gives NSA managers summaries of the NSA's world wide data collection activities by counting metadata.[1] The existence of this tool was disclosed by documents leaked by Edward Snowden, who worked at the NSA for the defense contractor Booz Allen Hamilton.[2] Those disclosed documents were in a direct contradiction to the NSA's assurance to United States Congress that it does not collect any type of data on millions of Americans.[3] History[edit] Intelligence gathered by the United States government inside the United States or specifically targeting US citizens is legally required to be gathered in compliance with the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978 (FISA) and under the authority of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court (FISA court).[4][5][6] A second correction is about by whom and where these data were collected.

EQUIPPED TO SURVIVE - Outdoors Gear, Survival Equipment Review & Survival Information How being called smart can actually make you stupid | Neurobonkers A few months ago I posted a piece which has become my most popular blog post by quite a landslide. The post covered various techniques for learning and looked at the empirical evidence for and against their efficacy based on recent research. This post is my follow up, in which I look at the case for one tip for learning that it seems really could have a big impact. A growing body of evidence from the last two decades suggests that our attitude towards our own potential for intelligence has a considerable impact on our lives, furthermore we are incredibly vulnerable to having this attitude or "mindset" moulded for better or worse, by how people praise us in a way that is both shocking and problematic. Stanford psychology professor Carol Dweck has presented a range of startlingly fascinating findings on the topic which have been broadly supported by further research. References: Blackwell L.S., Trzesniewski K.H. & Dweck C.S. (2007). Kamins M.L. & Dweck C.S. (1999).

XKeyscore Logo for the XKeyscore program XKeyscore or XKEYSCORE (abbreviated as XKS) is a formerly secret computer system first used by the United States National Security Agency for searching and analyzing Internet data it collects worldwide every day. The program has been shared with other spy agencies including Australia's Defence Signals Directorate, New Zealand's Government Communications Security Bureau and the German Bundesnachrichtendienst.[1] The program's existence was publicly revealed in July 2013 by Edward Snowden in The Sydney Morning Herald and O Globo newspapers, though the codename is mentioned in earlier articles, and like many other codenames can also be seen in job postings, and in the online resumes of employees.[2][3] The scope of XKeyscore[edit] XKeyscore is a complicated system and various authors have different interpretations about its actual capabilities. According to Snowden and Greenwald[edit] According to the NSA[edit] Workings[edit] Data sources[edit] Capabilities[edit]

untitled Positive Disintegration The Theory of Positive Disintegration (TPD) by Kazimierz Dąbrowski is a theory of personality development. Unlike mainstream psychology, Dąbrowski's theoretical framework views psychological tension and anxiety as necessary for growth. These "disintegrative" processes are therefore seen as "positive," whereas people who fail to go through positive disintegration may remain for their entire lives in a state of "primary integration." Unlike some other theories of development such as Erikson's stages of psychosocial development, it is not assumed that even a majority of people progress through all levels. Dąbrowski's theory[edit] Kazimierz Dąbrowski (1902–1980), a Polish psychiatrist and psychologist, developed the Theory of Positive Disintegration over his lifetime of clinical and academic work. Dąbrowski's theory of personality development emphasized several major features including: Factors in development[edit] Development potential[edit] Overexcitability Abilities and talents The third factor

Fairview (surveillance program) Fairview is a secret mass surveillance programme run by the National Security Agency, aimed at collecting phone, internet and e-mail data in bulk from the computers and mobile telephones of foreign countries' citizens.[1] According to 2013 revelations by whistleblower Edward Snowden: The NSA partners with a large US telecommunications company...[which] partners with telecoms in the foreign countries, [which] then allow the US company access to those countries' telecommunications systems, and that access is then exploited to direct traffic to the NSA's repositories.[2] According to the revelations, the NSA had collected 2.3 billion separate pieces of data from Brazilian users in January 2013 alone.[1] Several weeks earlier, Snowden had revealed that the NSA was also harvesting the telephone metadata and text messages from over a billion subscribers in China, however no precise program name was reported at the time.[3] 2nd FAIRVIEW presentation: Where SS0 is accessing your target

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