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How Teaching Is Changing: 15 Examples

How Teaching Is Changing: 15 Examples
How Teaching Is Changing: 15 New Realities Every Educator Faces by Terry Heick It’s tempting to say that no matter how much technology pushes on education, every teacher will always need to know iconic teacher practices like assessment, curriculum design, classroom management, and cognitive coaching. This may end up being true–how education changes in the next 20 years is a choice rather than the inevitable tidal wave of social and technological change it’s easy to sit back and wait for. Think of the very limited change in education since 2000 compared to the automotive industry, computer industry, retail consumer industry, etc. Huge leaps forward are not a foregone conclusion. But it’s probably going to be a bit different than that. We’ve written before about the kinds of “things” modern teachers must be able to do. (Hint: It’s no longer about classroom management, testing, and content delivery.) 1. The Difference: Precision 2. The Old: Numbers, letters, and maybe a bar graph or pie chart

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What Students Really Need to Hear It’s 4 a.m. I’ve struggled for the last hour to go to sleep. But, I can’t. Yet again, I am tossing and turning, unable to shut down my brain. Why? Because I am stressed about my students. 6 Tips for Getting Started with Genius Hour Posted 05/22/2014 2:36PM | Last Commented 02/02/2015 11:36AM Genius hour is a great way to allow students to drive their own personalized instruction but where to begin such a big project? How to Get Started There are a lot of resources out there already, and most of the teachers that are embarking on this process are willing to share what they have or help you problem solve. The following all have something to offer: Practical Tips

Never Too Young To Code Kindergartners use Bee-Bots to explore coding and mapping skills at the Cook SchoolPhotos courtesy of Catherine Cook School As with other aspects of tech use in early childhood, deep discussions are underway about the appropriate role coding has in young children’s classrooms—and in the library. Sometimes referred to as the “new literacy” in schools, teaching coding means teaching children the language used to operate tablets, computers, and other devices they interact with every day. Teaching Videos Each one of our made-from-scratch videos has been created to help you become a better teacher. We look at instruction and assessment strategies, classroom management, technology, presentation and design. Every effort is made to make each concept clear and simple. Most of our videos contain small, brief advertisements. Although we would love to keep them ad-free, it is one small way to pay for the cost of producing them. Thanks for your understanding.

Why Teaching Is Like Farming Sometimes, I think that teaching is a lot like farming. I know that statement won’t immediately convince most of you, but sometimes, you need to think of yourself as a farmer. Reap, Sow This principle is as old as time. It is fair to say that farming was one of the first professions.

Reinventing School From the Ground Up For Inquiry Learning By Thom Markham A grave miscalculation exists in the minds of many educators: That inquiry-based learning, project based learning, and 21st century competencies can flourish in industrial model schools. Under this world view, the inquiry goals of the Common Core State Standards are “strategies” to be added to the existing list of classroom techniques, while skills like collaboration, communication, or creativity can be taught despite 43-minute periods, desks in rows, and pacing guides set in stone.

9 Elephants in the (Class)Room That Should “Unsettle” Us — Modern Learning “When I really try to square what I believe about how kids learn and what we practice in our classrooms, it unsettles me.” A t a recent morning workshop for school leaders at a fairly small New England public school district, about an hour into a conversation focused on what they believed about how kids learn best, an assistant superintendent somewhat surprisingly said aloud what many in the room were no doubt feeling. “When I really try to square what I believe about how kids learn and what we practice in our classrooms, it unsettles me,” she said. “And it frustrates me.” As it should. One of the things I’ve come to realize in my many discussions with educators from around the globe is that there are a number of practices in our current systems of schooling that “unsettle” us, primarily because they don’t comport with what Seymour Papert calls our “stock of intuitive, empathic, common sense knowledge about learning.”

Poles of Learning, Snappers, and Making the Time - Matt Ives People tend to dichotomise teaching and learning into handy, easy to digest concepts. Student led, good; teacher led, bad. Enquiry learning, good; direct instruction, bad.

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