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For Students, the Importance of Doing Work That Matters

For Students, the Importance of Doing Work That Matters
MartinaK15 By Will Richardson We’re halfway to school when my 14-year-old son remembers a homework assignment he forgot to do for biology class. “Something big?” It’s happened before, many times, in fact, that “it doesn’t matter” response when it comes to work both of my kids are doing in school. That’s an especially frustrating reality for me because in my travels to schools around the world I see lots of examples of “work that matters”; high school kids in Philadelphia designing solar panels for hospitals in the African bush; middle school kids in San Diego writing books about their local ecosystems and selling them in local stores; primary school kids designing a new classroom wing being built at their school outside of Melbourne, Australia. “Work that matters” has significance beyond classroom walls; it’s work that is created for an authentic audience who might enjoy it or benefit from it even in a small way. Are these kids outliers? Still, we can start small, can’t we? Related:  lohynova

Living Schools Lab With the participation of 15 partners, including 12 education ministries, the two-year Living Schools Lab project promoted a whole-school approach to ICT use, scaling up best practices in the use of ICT between schools with various levels of technological proficiency. The participating schools were supported through peer-exchanges in regional hubs, pan-European teams working collaboratively on a number themes, and a variety of opportunities for teachers' ongoing professional development. Observation of advanced schools in 12 countries produced a report and recommendations on the mainstreaming of best practice, and the development of whole-school approaches to ICT. The project was funded by the FP7 of European Commission, and ended in September 2014. Download the LSL project summary (English, PDF) here and explore more LSL resources and outcomes below. The project summary is also available in the following languages: CZ, DE, FI, FR, GA, IT, LT, NO, PT. Outcomes Videos

Can Free Play Prevent Depression and Anxiety In Kids? Over the past 50-60 years, play time in kids’ lives has been drastically cut. School days and years are longer and parents often schedule enrichment activities for their children instead of giving them space to direct their own play. Children are rarely given the freedom to direct their own activities, leading to a persistent rise in children feeling that they have no control over their lives. Check out his TEDx talk for all the details on this fascinating area of research. Related

Failing Forward: 21 Ideas To Use It In Your Classroom Failing Forward: 21 Ideas To Help Students Keep Their Momentum by Terry Heick “Failing Forward” is a relatively recent entry into our cultural lexicon–at least as far has headlines go anyway–that has utility for students and teachers. Popularized from the book of the same name, the idea behind failing forward is to see failing as a part of success rather than its opposite. So what might this look like in your classroom? Failing Forward In The Classroom: 21 Ideas To Help Students Keep Their Momentum 1. How does this promote failing forward? Say: “Your design work on the app blueprint is coming along nicely. 2. How does this promote failing forward? Say: “Your first two drafts didn’t work so well, huh? 3. How does this promote failing forward? Say: “How did your audience respond to your ideas? 4. How does this promote failing forward? 5. How does this promote failing forward? Say: “This essay was well-conceived; loved the clear purpose here, so you got full points for your initial execution.

MindShift | How we will learn MindShift explores the future of learning in all its dimensions. We examine how learning is being impacted by technology, discoveries about how the brain works, poverty and inequities, social and emotional practices, assessments, digital games, design thinking and music, among many other topics. We look at how learning is evolving in the classroom and beyond.We also revisit old ideas that have come full circle in the era of the over scheduled child, such as unschooling, tinkering, playing in the woods, mindfulness, inquiry-based learning and student motivation. We report on shifts in how educators practice their craft as they apply innovative ideas to help students learn, while meeting the rigorous demands of their standards and curriculum. Contact the us by email.

New Technologies and 21st Century Skills Can Free Play Prevent Depression and Anxiety In Kids? Over the past 50-60 years, play time in kids’ lives has been drastically cut. School days and years are longer and parents often schedule enrichment activities for their children instead of giving them space to direct their own play. Children are rarely given the freedom to direct their own activities, leading to a persistent rise in children feeling that they have no control over their lives. And, while correlation doesn’t prove causation, Dr. Peter Gray, who has been studying play for years, says there’s strong evidence that in this case, the decline in play is leading to a rise in depression and acute anxiety among young people. Check out his TEDx talk for all the details on this fascinating area of research. Related

Freebies for Science Teachers GeneEd Added: Jul 14, 2017 Revisit the National Library of Medicine’s GeneEd for new resources. To access the new materials, click on the Topics tab, go to Top Issues in Genetics, and select the links Genetics, Behavior and Identity, or Precision Medicine. Research Initiatives | Center for Childhood Creativity High-quality, empirical research provides the foundation for all of the CCC’s work. We take pride in contributing to the advancement of scientific understanding of childhood creativity through university partnerships and bringing exemplary, important research to our advisory work. CCC-authored white papers summarize key academic studies and provide new frameworks for understanding child development and creativity development. Our on-site research lab at the Bay Area Discovery Museum's Creative Thinking Lab gives academic researchers an opportunity to conduct studies on site with Museum visitors. Additionally, the CCC and Bay Area Discovery Museum partner to educate visitors about early childhood research through a research toys program. Inspiring a Generation to Create: Critical Components of Creativity in Children synthesizes more than 150 studies from various academic fields contributing to our understanding of creativity. Read the Executive Summary

One third of adults with dyslexia report they were physically abused during their childhood TORONTO, ON – Adults who have dyslexia are much more likely to report they were physically abused before they turned 18 than their peers without dyslexia, according to a new study from researchers at the University of Toronto and the University of North Carolina School of Medicine in Chapel Hill. Thirty-five per cent of adults with dyslexia report they were physically abused before they turned 18. In contrast, seven per cent of those without dyslexia reported that they had experienced childhood physical abuse. “Even after accounting for age, race, sex and other early adversities such as parental addictions, childhood physical abuse was still associated with a six-fold increase in the odds of dyslexia” says co-author Esme Fuller-Thomson, professor and Sandra Rotman Endowed Chair at University of Toronto’s Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work. The results were in a study published online this week in Journal of Interpersonal Violence. For more information, contact: Prof. Stephen R.

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