background preloader

For Students, the Importance of Doing Work That Matters

For Students, the Importance of Doing Work That Matters
MartinaK15 By Will Richardson We’re halfway to school when my 14-year-old son remembers a homework assignment he forgot to do for biology class. “Something big?” I ask, fearing the worst. “Nah,” he says with a shrug. It’s happened before, many times, in fact, that “it doesn’t matter” response when it comes to work both of my kids are doing in school. That’s an especially frustrating reality for me because in my travels to schools around the world I see lots of examples of “work that matters”; high school kids in Philadelphia designing solar panels for hospitals in the African bush; middle school kids in San Diego writing books about their local ecosystems and selling them in local stores; primary school kids designing a new classroom wing being built at their school outside of Melbourne, Australia. “Work that matters” has significance beyond classroom walls; it’s work that is created for an authentic audience who might enjoy it or benefit from it even in a small way.

http://blogs.kqed.org/mindshift/2014/04/what-if-we-assigned-students-work-that-matters-outside-of-school/

Related:  lohynovaInstructionalAcross ContentInteressant

Living Schools Lab With the participation of 15 partners, including 12 education ministries, the two-year Living Schools Lab project promoted a whole-school approach to ICT use, scaling up best practices in the use of ICT between schools with various levels of technological proficiency. The participating schools were supported through peer-exchanges in regional hubs, pan-European teams working collaboratively on a number themes, and a variety of opportunities for teachers' ongoing professional development. Observation of advanced schools in 12 countries produced a report and recommendations on the mainstreaming of best practice, and the development of whole-school approaches to ICT. The project was funded by the FP7 of European Commission, and ended in September 2014. Download the LSL project summary (English, PDF) here and explore more LSL resources and outcomes below. The project summary is also available in the following languages: CZ, DE, FI, FR, GA, IT, LT, NO, PT.

20 Collaborative Learning Tips And Strategies For Teachers 20 Collaborative Learning Tips And Strategies For Teachers by Miriam Clifford This post has been updated from a 2011 post. There is an age old adage that says “two heads are better than one”. Consider collaboration in recent history: Watson and Crick or Page and Brin (Founders of Google).

Failing Forward: 21 Ideas To Use It In Your Classroom Failing Forward: 21 Ideas To Help Students Keep Their Momentum by Terry Heick “Failing Forward” is a relatively recent entry into our cultural lexicon–at least as far has headlines go anyway–that has utility for students and teachers. Popularized from the book of the same name, the idea behind failing forward is to see failing as a part of success rather than its opposite.

What skills will you need to succeed in the future? Top 10 skills for the successful 21st-century worker Leadership Center for Childhood Creativity High-quality, empirical research provides the foundation for all of the CCC’s work. We take pride in contributing to the advancement of scientific understanding of childhood creativity through university partnerships and bringing exemplary, important research to our advisory work. CCC-authored white papers summarize key academic studies and provide new frameworks for understanding child development and creativity development. Our on-site research lab at the Bay Area Discovery Museum's Creative Thinking Lab gives academic researchers an opportunity to conduct studies on site with Museum visitors. Additionally, the CCC and Bay Area Discovery Museum partner to educate visitors about early childhood research through a research toys program.

Defining Collaborative Teaching If only Teacher A and Teacher B could check their calendars and begin scheduling weekly meetings they could create a true collaborative relationship. Together, they would begin to construct fully structured bridges between their curriculums that would not only bring them deep professional satisfaction, more importantly; they would enrich the learning experiences of their students. Try to picture the collaborative environment Teacher A and Teacher B could produce.

Freebies for Science Teachers Graphite: Digital Resources Site Added: Dec 6, 2013 Graphite is a free online portal to help preK-12 educators find, use, and share the best digital apps, games, and websites for their students. 5 Body Postures That May Actually Boost Your Self-Esteem Wisdom tells us that the body is not worth as much as our inner being. However, it is our body that bridges the world into our soul. It is the means that nurtures our being not only by what our environment shows us. It is also affected by the way we choose to move and act our bodies. Sir Ken Robinson – The Education Economy It has often struck me that a conflict of interest exists across education systems, state or private, where the awarding bodies of high stakes examinations are also owned by the very same companies who sell the content, that must be learned, to pass the test. Such an end to end business model would make a lot of sense for the entrepreneurially minded and quite possibly create very large enterprises as a consequence. The “big edu” of the learning sector, if you don’t mind indulging my conspiratorial whimsy for a moment longer. Imagine if automotive companies were owned by the oil industry. We would still be driving around in cars that did 5 miles to the gallon with no sign of a real commitment to clean, sustainable energy in sight. End to end business models, cartels and monopolies tend to be bad for innovation and progress.

Related: