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84 (And Counting) Bloom's Taxonomy Tools Worth Trying

84 (And Counting) Bloom's Taxonomy Tools Worth Trying
We know y’all love a good list of Bloom’s Taxonomy tools. And the one we’re highlighting below isn’t only good – its growing, because it is crowdsourced by awesome teachers like you! Created by NJ Superintendent Scott Rocco, this list is chock-full of tons of different apps that can fill out just about every category of Bloom’s Taxonomy. It includes the name of the tool, what level of Bloom’s Taxonomy it addresses, where you can find it, what it does, and last but definitely not least, how you’ve been using it in your classroom. As of this writing, there are 83 tools in the list. So go on- check it out!

http://www.edudemic.com/blooms-taxonomy-tools-worth-trying/

Related:  Bloom's TaxonomyBloomWebsites to Check Out

Using Instagram, Bloom’s Taxonomy & Student Interest As A Fun Part Of A Semester Final I’ve previously posted about some elements in my upcoming finals (see My Best Posts On Writing Instruction and scroll down near the bottom). Another element I’m trying out this year is having students in all my classes create Instagrams (see other ways I’ve used Instagram and Vine in my classes at The Best Resources For Learning To Use The Video Apps “Vine” & Instagram). They’ll all be somewhat different: * My ninth-grade English students will identify questions (following some lessons on Bloom’s Taxonomy) they still have about the units we’ve studied this year and find the answers to them.

How To Use Bloom’s Taxonomy To Write Learning Outcomes By: Scott Davis Business Analyst, Pearson It is often quite difficult to relate inputs to outcomes in the world of education. Traditionally, much work has been done to develop and provide inputs into the process of education. These inputs, such as a textbook, an assessment, a learning technology or platform, a course, a qualification, a high-stakes test or professional development for teachers are put into the hands of an educational leader, a skillful teacher, or an eager student. And, for all of the investment, expertise, and care that go into their creation, that has typically been where the involvement ends. Rarely has one been able to measure or predict the learning outcomes from using these inputs.

Focus on Form-ative Assessment A few months ago I wrote a post about the value of utilizing Google Forms in education and shared a super cool resource containing 80+ ways to incorporate them into the classroom. Well, I’m back again… With more reasons why you should become a fan of this edtech gem… Yep, this geeky girl love, loves this particular component of Google Apps for Education.

Using Bloom's Taxonomy In The 21st Century: 4 Strategies For Teaching 4 Strategies For Teaching With Bloom’s Taxonomy by TeachThought Staff Bloom’s Taxonomy can be a powerful tool to transform teaching and learning. Bloom's Taxonomy Resources Bloom’s Taxonomy can be a powerful tool to transform teaching and learning. By design, it focuses attention away from content and instruction, and instead emphasizes the “cognitive events” in the mind of a child. And this is no small change. For decades, education reform has been focused on curriculum, assessment, instruction, and more recently standards, and data, with these efforts only bleeding over into how students think briefly, and by chance. This means that the focus of finite teacher and school resources are not on promoting thinking and understanding, but rather what kinds of things students are going to be thinking about and how they’ll prove they understand them. This stands in contrast to the characteristics of the early 21st century, which include persistent connectivity, dynamic media forms, information-rich (digital and non-digital) environments, and an emphasis on visibility for pretty much everything.

Rubrics for Assessment Tom Daccord, Director of EdTechTeacher (MA) Justin Reich Co-Founder of EdTechTeacher (MA) Greg Kulowiec, Instructor & Presenter (MA) Beth Holland, Communications & Instruction (RI) Shawn McCusker, Instructor & Presenter, (IL) Patrick Larkin, Senior Associate & Instructor (MA) Teaching critical thinking using Bloom’s Taxonomy - Cambridge Conversations In her previous post for Cambridge Conversations, Unlock author Carolyn Westbrook introduced the basics of teaching Critical Thinking in ELT. Today, she explores Bloom’s Taxonomy. Bloom’s Taxonomy of Learning Objectives classifies a number of skills which can be used to teach critical thinking. The six skills are often depicted as a triangle, as above. However, representing the skills like this gives the impression of a hierarchical approach to critical thinking.

Bloom's Taxonomy of Learning Domains Bloom's Taxonomy was created in 1956 under the leadership of educational psychologist Dr Benjamin Bloom in order to promote higher forms of thinking in education, such as analyzing and evaluating concepts, processes, procedures, and principles, rather than just remembering facts (rote learning). It is most often used when designing educational, training, and learning processes. The Three Domains of Learning The committee identified three domains of educational activities or learning (Bloom, et al. 1956): 22 Ways To Use Twitter For Learning Based On Bloom's Taxonomy Last year we created a “twitter spectrum,” an image that clarified different ways that twitter could be used in the classroom in (hopefully) authentic ways. TeachBytes has followed that up with an excellent graphic of their own that uses a pure Bloom’s Taxonomy approach. The specific ideas range from “remix trending tweets with video and music” to creating concept maps showing the relationship between tweets. We must admit to going back and forth over the exact fit of a social media platform like twitter in a formal (or informal) learning environment. Clearly it’s a great way to skim and monitor information streams, but just like we wouldn’t use sing Shakespearean sonnets to toddlers at birthday parties, using twitter as an in-depth critical thinking tool requires a bit of squinting, even as an Avante-garde 21st century learning tool.

- Ten Engaging Digital Education Sites For Any Social Studies Classroom 0 Comments November 5, 2014 By: Michael Gorman Nov 4 Written by: 11/4/2014 8:57 PM ShareThis A Powerful App For Every Level Of Bloom's Taxonomy Bloom’s Taxonomy has been steadily increasing its presence in my everyday reads lately. The revised version is really speaking to a lot of educators who are using it – often in concert with a variety of technologies – to address the different levels of educational objectives. (Note: If you need a quick refresher on the basics of Bloom’s Taxonomy, check out this post). Using Apps

K-5 iPad Apps According to Bloom's Taxonomy An elementary library media specialist reviews iPad apps as they map to an updated version of Bloom's Taxonomy in this six-part series. Diane Darrow is an artist, Reading Recovery teacher, and library media specialist at Bel Aire Elementary in Tiburon, CA. You can follow her on Twitter at @dianedarrow. In this six-part series, I will highlight apps useful for developing higher order thinking skills in grades K-5 classrooms. Each list will highlight a few apps that connect to the various stages on Bloom's continuum of learning. Given the size and current exponential growth of the app market, I will also assist educators in setting criteria necessary to identify apps that maintain the integrity of teaching for thinking.

44 Prompts Merging Reflective Thinking With Bloom's Taxonomy 44 Prompts Merging Reflective Thinking With Bloom’s Taxonomy by Peter Pappas It’s been four years since I first published my “Taxonomy of Reflection.” My interest in reflective thinking is rooted in a simple but powerful statement by Donald Finkel who wrote that teaching should be thought of as “providing experience, provoking reflection.”

We Need You to Vote on Whether these Explorers are Heroes or Villains! Fourth grade has been hard at work. They have been researching multiple explorers in their social studies standards and considering whether those explorers are heroes or villains. It all started with a lesson in the library using a video about Christopher Columbus, Encounter by Jane Yolen, and Tagxedo. After that, students selected an explorer and began their research. They took their information and used that to write a persuasive piece convincing an audience that their explorer is a hero or villain.

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