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New Quantum Theory Could Explain the Flow of Time

New Quantum Theory Could Explain the Flow of Time
Cups of coffee cool, buildings crumble and stars fizzle out, physicists say, because of a strange quantum effect called “entanglement.” Photo: Stacy/Flickr Coffee cools, buildings crumble, eggs break and stars fizzle out in a universe that seems destined to degrade into a state of uniform drabness known as thermal equilibrium. The astronomer-philosopher Sir Arthur Eddington in 1927 cited the gradual dispersal of energy as evidence of an irreversible “arrow of time.” But to the bafflement of generations of physicists, the arrow of time does not seem to follow from the underlying laws of physics, which work the same going forward in time as in reverse. By those laws, it seemed that if someone knew the paths of all the particles in the universe and flipped them around, energy would accumulate rather than disperse: Tepid coffee would spontaneously heat up, buildings would rise from their rubble and sunlight would slink back into the sun. “I was darn close to driving a taxicab,” Lloyd said.

http://www.wired.com/2014/04/quantum-theory-flow-time/

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Spacecraft Propulsion Device Invented by 19-year Old Student By: Amanda Froelich, True Activist. With passion to persevere and see a project succeed, anything is possible. This is certainly true for a young student in the Middle East.Aisha Mustafa, a 19-year old female student from the University of Sohag in Egypt, recently developed a new type of propulsion system for space crafts. Her newly patented invention uses cutting edge quantum physics instead of thrusters, and is an innovative design that may radically change a more than one field.

New math and quantum mechanics: Fluid mechanics suggests alternative to quantum orthodoxy The central mystery of quantum mechanics is that small chunks of matter sometimes seem to behave like particles, sometimes like waves. For most of the past century, the prevailing explanation of this conundrum has been what's called the "Copenhagen interpretation" -- which holds that, in some sense, a single particle really is a wave, smeared out across the universe, that collapses into a determinate location only when observed. But some founders of quantum physics -- notably Louis de Broglie -- championed an alternative interpretation, known as "pilot-wave theory," which posits that quantum particles are borne along on some type of wave. According to pilot-wave theory, the particles have definite trajectories, but because of the pilot wave's influence, they still exhibit wavelike statistics. John Bush, a professor of applied mathematics at MIT, believes that pilot-wave theory deserves a second look. Tracking trajectories

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New Clock May End Time As We Know It Strontium atoms floating in the center of this photo are the heart of the world's most precise clock. The clock is so exact that it can detect tiny shifts in the flow of time itself. Courtesy of the Ye group and Brad Baxley/JILA hide caption

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