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Breaking News on EFF Victory: Appeals Court Holds that Email Privacy Protected by Fourth Amendment

Breaking News on EFF Victory: Appeals Court Holds that Email Privacy Protected by Fourth Amendment
Related:  Privacy

Can the NSA and CIA use your phone to track your location? July 26, 2011, 12:43 PM — There's no need to panic, or start shopping for aluminum-foil headwear, but the super-secret National Security Agency has apparently been thinking frequently enough about whether the NSA is allowed to intercept location data from cell phones to track U.S. citizens that the agency's chief lawyer was able to speak intelligently about it off the cuff while interviewing for a different job. "There are certain circumstances where that authority may exist," even if the NSA has no warrant to investigate a the person whose privacy it is invading or global permission to eavesdrop on everyone, according to Matthew Olsen, the NSA's general counsel. He didn't come to talk about that particularly; he said it yesterday in response to a question from the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, which was considering whether he'd be a good choice to run the National Counterterrorism Center. So far, though, no law.

Interviews - Mark Klein | Spying On The Home Front | FRONTLINE What did you do for AT&T? How long did you work there? I worked at AT&T for 22 and a half years. My job was basically to keep the systems going. So you handled the hottest high-tech stuff that AT&T had. That's right. What goes on inside the building on Folsom Street [in San Francisco]? While I was there we worked on three floors which belonged to AT&T. So this is an operations center. Well, this is an important hub for the Bay Area in terms of if you're talking about Internet. And then of course there's also the traditional phone switch, which is doing what it's been doing since before the Internet. Handling millions of calls. ... Handling millions and millions of phone calls, right. So this is a big hub. It's a big hub, yes. Take me back to the summer of 2002. ... Don Henry? Don Henry, who mentioned that there was going to be a visit from this person from the National Security Agency. ... Sometime later, maybe a few weeks -- I don't remember exactly -- he did show up. The secret room Yes. ...

Copyright Abuse in Ohio Governor Election UPDATE: The video was restored on October 8. We thank YouTube for its willingness to restore the video so promptly. With just weeks to go before Ohio votes on its next governor, the contest has devolved into a copyright squabble that is keeping a political video off YouTube on the basis of a bogus copyright claim. A couple of days ago, Congressman John Kasich put out a commercial that featured a man dressed as a steelworker discussing Governor Ted Strickland’s record. It turns out that the steelworker depicted in the commercial wasn't an actual steelworker, but paid actor Chip Redden. In response, the Ohio Democratic Party promptly published a YouTube video capitalizing on this, illustrating its point with short clips from Redden's acting career. Untitled from Jeremy Froughlin on Vimeo. While the use of copyright to take down political speech in the weeks before an election is hardly new (CDT just published a detailed report), this is a particularly egregious example.

Republican Secretary of State in Indiana indicted on voter fraud - National Political Buzz For much of the 2010 election cycle conservatives warned about the potential of voter fraud from Democrats. Four months after the election conservatives finally appear to have a “slam dunk case” of voter fraud. However, the case appears to involve one of their own. Indiana Secretary of State Charlie White (R) has been indicted on seven felony counts of fraud, perjury, and theft related to the 2010 midterm elections. As Secretary of State for Indiana, White serves as the top election official in the state. White allegedly lied about his address when he voted in the 2010 Republican primary in Indiana. White allegedly lied about his residence so that he could keep his position as a member of the Fishers Town Council.

Microsoft Online Surveillance Guide - Cryptome Leak Cryptome, a whistleblower site that regularly leaks sensitive documents from governments and corporations, is in hot water again: this time, for publishing Microsoft’s “Global Criminal Compliance Handbook,” a comprehensive, 22-page guide running down the surveillance services Microsoft will perform for law enforcement agencies on its various online platforms, which includes detailed instructions for IP address extraction. You can find the guide here (warning: PDF). not anymore. Microsoft has demanded that Cryptome take down the guide — on the grounds that it constitutes a “copyrighted [work] published by Microsoft.” Yesterday, at 5pm, Cryptome editor John Young received a notice from his site’s host, Network Solutions, bearing a stiff ultimatum: citing the Digital Millenium Copyright Act (DMCA), Network Solutions told him that unless he takes the “copyrighted material” down, they will “disable [his] website” on Thursday, February 25, 2010. So far, Young refuses to budge. So, briefly: 1.

Aurora critics can remain anonymous, judge rules In a decision with broader implications for online privacy, a judge has ruled not to force the identification of anonymous bloggers who wrote critical web posts about former Aurora mayor Phyllis Morris. The Ontario Superior Court ruling, which Ms. Morris intends to appeal, is a major blow to her $6-million defamation action, which targets three individuals who authored anonymous posts on the Aurora Citizen website, along with the site's moderators. In her decision, Judge Carole Brown weighed Ms. Morris's allegations against the fundamental right to freedom of speech and found the former mayor's case wanting. "The public interest favouring disclosure [of the bloggers' names] clearly does not outweigh the legitimate interests in freedom of expression and the right to privacy of the persons sought to be identified," Judge Brown wrote, noting the three anonymous defendants, who chose to make comments on the site using pseudonyms, had "a reasonable expectation of anonymity." Ms. Ms.

FBI, DOJ and DEA Stall Release of Records on Bid to Expand Surveillance Laws Today EFF filed a reply brief in its FOIA lawsuit seeking records from the FBI, DOJ and DEA that would justify the Administration’s need to expand federal surveillance laws like the Communications Assistance to Law Enforcement Act (CALEA). The proposed expansion would require communications providers like Skype, Facebook, Blackberry and Twitter to build wiretapping capabilities right into their systems, and although we know Congress intends to turn to this issue early this year, FBI, DEA and DOJ have argued they can’t give us all the documents we asked for until the summer of 2012. To force the government to turn over documents on a timeline that would actually allow them to influence the debate, we filed a motion for partial summary judgment, asking the court to order the agencies to produce documents within 10 days. This lawsuit is based on two separate but related FOIA requests, one of which has now been pending with the FBI for almost two years.

Chevron chiefs face shareholders after huge $18bn Ecuador fine | Environment Chevron bosses are facing shareholders for the first time since the company was fined a total of $18bn (£11.1bn) by a court in Ecuador over contamination from oil extraction in the Amazon. California's largest oil company is coming under increasing pressure from institutional investors and long-term shareholders who are gathering at the annual general meeting at Chevron's HQ in San Ramon, near San Francisco. A judge ruled in February this year that the company was liable to pay $8.6bn in damages, mostly to decontaminate polluted soil. The judge also awarded $860,000 to plaintiffs and a further $8.6bn in punitive damages. Chevron has appealed the decision, which amounts to the largest award in corporate history, exceeded only by BP's $20bn compensation fund after the Gulf oil spill. The New York State Common Retirement Fund – which manages $150bn of state government pensions – has filed a resolution calling on Chevron to appoint an independent board member with environmental expertise.

How To Permanently Delete Your Account on Popular Websites - Smashing Magazine Advertisement We all have an increasing number of sites and online services we’re members of, and sometimes it all gets a little overwhelming. At times, we just need to delete our memberships to some sites, either in an effort to simplify our lives or just because we’ve grown tired of a particular site or service. What we often don’t realize when signing up for all these accounts, though, is how difficult it can be to permanently delete our accounts when we’ve had enough. Some require complicated, multi-step processes that can stretch over the course of days (or weeks). Others take less time, but still require multiple steps by the user. Below we’ll take a look at the account deletion processes of popular websites and services, and how easy or difficult they make it. Facebook Difficulty (on a scale of 1-5, 5 being hardest): 5 Deleting a Facebook account is a bit more complicated than many other services. Then you can use the form found here to request deletion. Twitter Difficulty: 2 MySpace

House panel approves broadened ISP snooping bill | Privacy Inc. Internet providers would be forced to keep logs of their customers' activities for one year--in case police want to review them in the future--under legislation that a U.S. House of Representatives committee approved today. The 19 to 10 vote represents a victory for conservative Republicans, who made data retention their first major technology initiative after last fall's elections, and the Justice Department officials who have quietly lobbied for the sweeping new requirements, a development first reported by CNET. A last-minute rewrite of the bill expands the information that commercial Internet providers are required to store to include customers' names, addresses, phone numbers, credit card numbers, bank account numbers, and temporarily-assigned IP addresses, some committee members suggested. It represents "a data bank of every digital act by every American" that would "let us find out where every single American visited Web sites," said Rep. "The bill is mislabeled," said Rep. Rep.

Newly Released Documents Detail FBI’s Plan to Expand Federal Surveillance Laws EFF just received documents in response to a 2-year old FOIA request for information on the FBI’s "Going Dark" program, an initiative to increase the FBI's authority in response to problems the FBI says it's having implementing wiretap and pen register/trap and trace orders on new communications technologies. The documents detail a fully-formed and well-coordinated plan to expand existing surveillance laws and develop new ones. And although they represent only a small fraction of the documents we expect to receive in response to this and a more recent FOIA request, they were released just in time to provide important background information for the House Judiciary Committee’s hearing tomorrow on the Going Dark program. We first heard about the FBI’s Going Dark program in 2009, when the agency’s Congressional budget request included an additional $9 million to fund the program (on top of the $233.9 million it already received). What is the "Going Dark" Program? (GD2, p1). (GD2, p 8).

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