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329 BC: Alexander the Great records two great 'flying shields' - Central Asia, - 329 BC

329 BC: Alexander the Great records two great 'flying shields' - Central Asia, - 329 BC
Alexander the Great from the famous ancient mosaic. Classification & Features Type of Case/Report: StandardCase Hynek Classification: Special Features/Characteristics: Famous Person, Witness Photo Full Report / Article Source: Bruno Mancusi, UFO Updates mailing list, Apr. 18, 2003 [go to original source] Alexander the Great records two great silver shields, spitting fire around the rims in the sky that dived repeatedly at his army as they were attempting a river crossing. UFO researcher Bruno Mancusi, in a posting on the UFO Updates mailing list from April 18, 2003, gives the following references to this event. I had an e-mails exchange in 2001 with a Macedonian historian, Aleksandar Donski, about this tale. 1. Alexander the Great was not the first to see them nor was he the first to find them troublesome. Unfortunately, there is no reference. 2. "L'assedio di Tiro Durante l'assedio di Tiro nell'anno 332 a. (See English translation by Drake below.) 3. THE CATALOGUE-(i) B.C. 1. 4. 5.

Sumeria Curse of the pharaohs. The curse of the pharaohs refers to an alleged curse believed by some to be cast upon any person who disturbs the mummy of an Ancient Egyptian person, especially a pharaoh. This curse, which does not differentiate between thieves and archaeologists, allegedly can cause bad luck, illness or death. Since the mid-20th century, many authors and documentaries have argued that the curse is 'real' in the sense of being caused by scientifically explicable causes such as bacteria or radiation. However, the modern origins of Egyptian mummy curse tales, their development primarily in European cultures, the shift from magic to science to explain curses, and their changing uses—from condemning disturbance of the dead to entertaining horror film audiences—suggest that Egyptian curses are primarily a cultural, not exclusively scientific, phenomenon.[1] Tomb curses[edit] There Were Giants Upon the Earth. Who are the "sons of God" and the Nephilim in Genesis 6:4? Dutt).

Introduction to Hindu Mythology Hindu religion is more philosophy than doctrine. There is no authoritative hierarchy of clergy; the religion is highly decentralized with multiple sects, perfectly acceptable to Hinduism (in contrast to the regrettable divisions within Christianity). The Hindu claim that there are different paths for each person. A practical definition of Hinduism: performing the duty (dharma) of one's stage in life and social status (caste). The essence of the Hindu vision of reality lies in the tension between dharma (social duty or righteousness) and moksha (release from the material world, final liberation from the endless cycles of rebirth). Both these perspectives, the world-supporting and the world-denying, are necessary to fulfill human destiny. Other important terms : karma = moral law of cause and effect (deeds of past lives determine present) samsara = rebirth according to the nature of a person's karma; what we are now is the sum of all we have done in the past. Dharma and caste Cycles of time

Aztec Religion - AZTEC GODS - Aztecs of Mexico History AZTEC RELIGION AZTEC STUDENT RESEARCH GUIDE (C)1997-2005 (Thomas H. Frederiksen) All rights reserved The following major Deities have been removed from this larger work and placed into their own section TITLED MAJOR DEITIES, along with their corresponding footnotes: TEXCATLIPOCA, QUETZALCOATL, ZIPE TOTEC, TLALOC, XOCHIQUETZAL, and HUITZILOPOCHTLI. See MAJOR DEITIES section. COLNAHUACATL- "The One From the Twisted Region" Wife is unknown and as the name may represent, this deity resided in one of nine hells(*9) told in Aztec mythology. AMAPAN- "Patron of the Ball" "Ball Court Deity" Along with Uappatzin, these two deities presided over the ball game(*10) and various ceremonies associated with the game itself which were conducted in Tenochtitlan. AMHIMITL -"Dart of Mixcoatl" Old Chichimec (*11) god from the ancient homeland of the Mexica in Aztlan. ____________________ 9 There are several books in print that detail the Aztec view of afterlife. ATLACOAYA- "Pulque God" 19 Alacaron, notes p. 230.

Greek Stories about Zeus-The Birth of Zeus, the King of the Gods Zeus was born by the Titans Cronus and Rhea. Cronus was notorious for being a very jealous and greedy deity. Out of the fear one of his children could take his throne, Cronus swallowed every child Rhea was giving birth to. However, when Rhea gave birth to her last child, Zeus, she managed to trick Cronus with the help of the Titans Uranus and Gaea. Zeus was raised secretly by the Nymphs and was fed with honey and milk from the goat nurse Amaltheia with the help of her broken-off horn. Soon came the day where Zeus was mature enough to claim the Kingdom of the World and he started a battle against his father and the Titans. Then, with the help of his siblings, Zeus overthrew the Titans in the depths of the Underworld, the Tartarus. After overthrowing his father Cronus, Zeus was confronted with the Giants and also the monster Typhon, which he both defeated successfully.

The Legendary Origins of Merlin the Magician Most people today have heard of Merlin the Magician, as his name has been popularized over the centuries and his story has been dramatized in numerous novels, films, and television programs. The powerful wizard is depicted with many magical powers, including the power of shapeshifting and is well-known in mythology as a tutor and mentor to the legendary King Arthur, ultimately guiding him towards becoming the king of Camelot. While these general tales are well-known, Merlin’s initial appearances were only somewhat linked to Arthur. It took many decades of adaptations before Merlin became the wizard of Arthurian legend he is known as today. Merlin the wizard. It is common belief that Merlin was created as a figure for Arthurian legend. Merlin was created as a combination of several historical and legendary figures. A giant helps Merlin build Stonehenge. Many years after Geoffrey’s Historia Regum Britanniae, Robert de Boron composed a poem called Merlin. Sources: By M R Reese

The Battle with the Titans - Classical Mythology With his rescued siblings, Zeus had the beginnings of an army with which to challenge Cronus. However, Cronus had some difficulty in assembling his own forces. Some of the Titans refused to help him in the struggle. None of the Titanesses participated, and Oceanus, Cronus's brother, also refused to fight. Prometheus possessed the gift of prophecy, which is why he pledged his loyalty to Zeus. In preparation for war, each side created fortifications. The war was a monumental conflict. Gaia told Zeus that freeing the Cyclopes and Hecatoncheires from Tartarus would gain the Olympians some very powerful allies. With these giants newly recruited to Zeus's army, the tide of the war began to turn. Zeus laid siege to Mount Othrys.

Greek Creation Story, Cronus and Rhea and Birth of Zeus According to Greek mythology, in the beginning there was nothing. This was called Chaos. From this nothingness came light, Mother Earth (Gaia) and Sky (Uranus) were formed. From Gaia and Uranus came six twins known as the Titans. The six twin Titans were named Oceanus and Thethys, Coeos and Phoebe, Hyperion and Thea, Creos and Themis, Iapetos and Clymene, and finally Cronos and Rhea. Gaia and Uranus also gave birth to three Cyclopes, three giants, each with fifty heads and one-hundred arms. Cronos cast the cut off genitals into the sea. After defeating his father, Cronos married his sister Rhea. Major Gods and Goddesses Aphrodite | Apollo | Ares | Artemis | Athena | Demeter | Dionysus Hades | Hephaestus | Hera | Hermes | Hestia | Poseidon | Zeus Heroes Achilles | Aeneas | Diomedes | Hector | Hercules | Jason | Odysseus | Perseus | Theseus Stories Introduction | Creation Story | Olympians VS. Original Sources of Greek-Roman Mythology Bibliography Follow our updates on Facebook or Twitter

Greek Gods Family Tree / Genealogy | ludios.org ludios.org Mythical Chronology of Greece This Mythical Chronology of Greece depicts the traditional chronology established for the events of ancient Greek mythology by ancient chronographers and mythographers. This list largely reflects the work of Saint Jerome, whose work in turn was based primarily on the analysis of Apollodorus, Diodorus Siculus, and Eusebius. [1] In a few cases, the chronology also reflects the opinions of more recent scholars, who have cross referenced the mythology to archeological discoveries. These interpolations are noted with italics. Although the Greeks did believe that much of their mythology was grounded in fact, this list is not intended to imply the literal existence of real-world parallels to all the characters listed below. The dates below are approximate. Timeline The ages referenced in this section are the five Ages of Man of Hesiod. Before Hesiod's ages: The Birth of the World (1800BC-1710BC) Chaos gives birth to Gaia Gaia gives birth to Uranus Uranus rapes Gaia. Cronos becomes ruler of Greece.

Epic of Creation (Mesopotamia) | Thematic Essay Stories describing creation are prominent in many cultures of the world. In Mesopotamia, the surviving evidence from the third millennium to the end of the first millennium B.C. indicates that although many of the gods were associated with natural forces, no single myth addressed issues of initial creation. It was simply assumed that the gods existed before the world was formed. Unfortunately, very little survives of Sumerian literature from the third millennium B.C. Several fragmentary tablets contain references to a time before the pantheon of the gods, when only the Earth (Sumerian: ki) and Heavens (Sumerian: an) existed. A Sumerian myth known today as "Gilgamesh and the Netherworld" opens with a mythological prologue. The origins of humans are described in another early second-millennium Sumerian poem, "The Song of the Hoe." In the Sumerian poem "The Debate between Grain and Sheep," the earth first appeared barren, without grain, sheep, or goats.

gods? Here is a part from a text which you can find at : It seems that the Pleiadeans who speak here tell us that Mankind was in a much better state before the Annunaki-gods arrived. These 'gods' just tore up our D.N.A. in order to be able to use us for their own purposes. An original plan that was made by prior gods is given, the plan of the 'LIVING LIBRARY'. "Mankind is an experiment. And so, these extensions of the prime creator went out, and began to experiment with the Prime Creator's energy as it existed within themselves. Now, these energies-- we will call them Gods -- Creator Gods -- went out, and began to create their own hierarchy. So, the original plan was brought about, and let us say that there was impeccable scurrying and shuffling -- all kinds of things -- to bring about individual representatives of all of the galaxies, so that they could have their representatives here upon this planet. When we speak of Light.

krishnajesusmyths The Krishna and Christian Jesus Parallels Robert Howard Kroepel Copyright © 2001 The parallels (similarities) of the hundu Krishna Myth to the Christian Jesus myth are strong evidence that Christianity stole/borrowed elements of the older myth. In comparing the Krishna and Jesus myths, some of the references of the Jesus myth are stories found in the so-called Apocryphal Gospels, the early Christian writings which were not accepted for the Christian Canon, which includes the Gospels of Mark, Matthew, Luke, and John, the Acts, and other letters. Special note will be made of the Apocryphal Gospel references. The Apocryphal Gospel myths are included because they give additional mythological information not found in the Canonic Gospels. Because we are interested in the total Jesus myth, this additional information is included. Here is a chart comparing the Jesus myth to the Krishna myth. Sources:

Sumerian Myths Sumerian civilization originated in what is now southern Iraq, just upriver from the mouths of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers. "Civilization" in this context means a settled town or city-dwelling people who possess a stable agricultural technology (including domesticated animals) and have developed a hierarchical system of social classes (peasants, laborers, slaves, craftsmen [smiths, masons, carpenters, potters, etc.], farmers, fishermen, merchants, doctors, architects, priests and temple attendants, bureaucrats, scribes, advisers, priest-kings). Since the climate of southern Iraq is hot and dry, agriculture requires an extensive irrigation system of canals and dikes. Often, the Sumerians wrote as if their civilization (agricultural techniques, cities, classes of people) came first, and people later. Map of Mesopotamian Archeological Sites (Oriental Institute, University of Chicago) Sumerian cities were close agglomerations of one or two story mud brick dwellings. Questions:1. 2. 3.

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