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Unbelievable Skeletons Unearthed From The Catacombs Of Rome

Unbelievable Skeletons Unearthed From The Catacombs Of Rome
Back in 1578 came the fascinating discovery of a network of labyrinthine tombs, lurking deep beneath the street of Rome. The tombs were home to the decayed skeletons of early Christian martyrs – believed to be saints on account of their bravery & unwavering support of Christian beliefs. Many of these skeletons (given the name ‘The Catacomb Saints’ by those who first discovered them) were then distributed across Europe (predominantly Germany) as replacements for the countless holy relics which had been smashed, stolen or destroyed during the Protestant Reformation. Once delivered, each skeleton was then clothed and adorned into a variety of precious jewels, expensive cloth, crowns, armour and even given wigs. They were put on display inside their designated churches as a reminder to all who visited, for the riches and wealth that awaited them post death – providing they swore allegiance to the Christian faith. It sounds like a tale straight from a Dan Brown novel doesn't it?

http://sobadsogood.com/2013/09/08/heavenly-bodies-cult-treasures-and-spectacular-saints-from-the-catacombs-by-paul-koudounaris/

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