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World's first lab-grown burger is eaten in London

World's first lab-grown burger is eaten in London
5 August 2013Last updated at 15:50 ET Food critics give their verdict on the burger's taste and texture The world's first lab-grown burger has been cooked and eaten at a news conference in London. Scientists took cells from a cow and, at an institute in the Netherlands, turned them into strips of muscle that they combined to make a patty. One food expert said it was "close to meat, but not that juicy" and another said it tasted like a real burger. Researchers say the technology could be a sustainable way of meeting what they say is a growing demand for meat. The burger was cooked by chef Richard McGeown, from Cornwall, and tasted by food critics Hanni Ruetzler and Josh Schonwald. Continue reading the main story Analysis Pallab GhoshScience correspondent, BBC News The world's population is continuing to increase and an ever greater proportion want to eat meat. And then of course there is the taste. "This is meat to me. Food writer Mr Schonwald said: "The mouthfeel is like meat.

http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-23576143

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World's first lab-grown burger to be cooked and eaten 4 August 2013Last updated at 22:31 ET By Pallab Ghosh Science correspondent, BBC News Professor Mark Post of Maastricht University explains how he and his colleagues made the world's first lab-grown burger The world's first lab-grown burger is to be unveiled and eaten at a news conference in London on Monday. Scientists took cells from a cow and, at an institute in the Netherlands, turned them into strips of muscle which they combined to make a patty. Researchers say the technology could be a sustainable way of meeting what they say is a growing demand for meat.

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