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Viewpoint: 10 big myths about World War One debunked

Viewpoint: 10 big myths about World War One debunked
25 February 2014Last updated at 15:45 GMT Much of what we think we know about the 1914-18 conflict is wrong, writes historian Dan Snow. No war in history attracts more controversy and myth than World War One. For the soldiers who fought it was in some ways better than previous conflicts, and in some ways worse. By setting it apart as uniquely awful we are blinding ourselves to the reality of not just WW1 but war in general. We are also in danger of belittling the experience of soldiers and civilians caught up in countless other appalling conflicts throughout history and the present day. 1. Fifty years before WW1 broke out, southern China was torn apart by an even bloodier conflict. Although more Britons died in WW1 than any other conflict, the bloodiest war in our history relative to population size is the Civil War, which raged in the mid-17th Century. 2. In the UK around six million men were mobilised, and of those just over 700,000 were killed. 3. 4. 5. Continue reading the main story 6.

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WW1 - Values from History - Inspire Aspire The Centenary commemorations for the First World War will begin in 2014 and there are many plans in place over the coming years. We have created this pilot poster template to mark this centenary and provide a new opportunity for self-discovery and personal development, helping you to find the inspiration to develop aspirations for your life. Completing this poster will help you learn about the values from history and the heroic stories of those who fought and suffered on the front, often making the ultimate sacrifice. In the process you will learn new things about yourself, about others and about history. You can use your poster to share what you have learned and your aspirations for the future. BBC Schools - Life in the trenches 31 October 2014Last updated at 15:07 Two British soldiers standing in a flooded communication trench during World War One On the Western Front, the war was fought in trenches. Trenches were long, narrow ditches dug into the ground where soldiers lived all day and night. There were many lines of German trenches on one side and many lines of Allied trenches on the other.

A quest for truth: why I made Only Remembered Tragedy: 10 million soldiers were killed world war one, this photograph shows one of the most well known mass war graves, Ypres in France. Photograph: Antonio Olmos/The Guardian A few years ago I came across the grave of a young British soldier in France, one of thousands, one of hundreds of thousands. I had stopped to look, I think, because there was a wreath of poppies lying there. I read on the gravestone that this was a private killed in 1918, just two weeks before the end of the first world war. He was aged just 21.

Teaching World War I With The New York Times This summer marked the 100th anniversary of the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria and his wife by a Serbian nationalist — the catalyst that sent Europe into a spiral of war and destruction for the next four and a half years. Below, we offer a series of topics and questions paired with Times essays, articles, slide shows and videos to help students dig deeper into the causes, effects and overall legacy of World War I. We imagine students could use these resources as part of a class jigsaw activity, a mini-research project or a jumping-off point for discussion and analysis.

Michael Morpurgo: We are who we are now, in large part, because of the first world war Michael Morpurgo came into the Guardian to do a podcast interview with two site members, Orli, aged 14 and JDBookGroup's Fernando aged 11. The resulting conversation was so beautiful and profound we decided to publish the whole transcript here! Fernando: What message do you want to give to children by basing so many of your books on the war?I don't want to give a message to children. Life In The Trenches There was nothing glamorous about trench life. World War 1 trenches were dirty, smelly and riddled with disease. For soldiers life in the trenches meant living in fear.

First world war centenary is a year to honour the dead but not to glorify On the morning of 18 August 1918, units of the Belgian army climbed out of their trenches and advanced. For the first time since the invasion of their country four years earlier, they drove the Germans back, and in doing so took the hamlet of De Kuiper. It was not recognisable any more as a place where anyone had ever lived, simply a desolate wasteland of mud and craters, but it was, nonetheless, Belgian land, their land. It was for Belgians a small but symbolic victory, a proud victory. Back home in Radlett, Hertfordshire, my grandfather, Emile Cammaerts, heard the glad news and rejoiced. Immigration: Stories of Yesterday and Today and Ellis Island World War II and the Postwar Period The United States entered World War II in 1942. During the war, immigration decreased.

MICHAEL GOVE: Why does the Left insist on belittling true British heroes? By Michael Gove Published: 22:30 GMT, 2 January 2014 | Updated: 23:16 GMT, 2 January 2014 The past has never had a better future. Because history is enjoying a renaissance in Britain. After years in which the study of history was declining in our schools, the numbers of young people showing an appetite for learning about the past, and a curiosity about our nation’s story, is growing once more. Life in the Trenches - History Learning Site Trenches and life within those trenches have become an enduring topic from World War One. Throughout the war millions of soldiers experienced and endured the horrors of trench warfare. Some wrote down for posterity what these experiences were and as time has moved on from World War One more and more of these written documents – frequently in the form of a diary – have come to light. Others wrote about their experiences in book-form. On the British side “Goodbye to All That” by Robert Graves is considered a classic. For the Germans, “All Quiet on the Western Front” by Erich von Remarque was considered to be such a potent anti-war book that Hitler banned it.

Search for the great war Change Station See Stations Search Results for "the great war" Filter byStationMedia TypeProgramVideo Length Showing 1 - 10 of 86 results Flight to Freedom: Introduction Slavery, according to historian and sociologist Orlando Patterson, was social death. This was especially so of the slavery practiced in the United States from its very founding as a colonial empire in 1609, to 1865, when ended the bloody struggle which abolished the institution and united the nation. During the three and one-half centuries of slavery's existence, millions of African-descended people were torn from their homes, separated from family and community, and brutally put to the lash for profit. These Africans resisted.

Far far from Ypres: Soldiers' songs shine light on WW1 attitudes 16 January 2014Last updated at 19:46 ET By Steven Brocklehurst BBC Scotland news website The songs of World War 1 often speak of disillusionment, bitterness, boredom and a very dark sense of humour, says Scottish folk singer and producer Ian McCalman. He says there was no talk of heroics in the songs the soldiers were singing in the trenches or in the music halls back in Blighty. "Another surprise was that there were very few songs with any animosity towards the Germans, who they were fighting," says McCalman.

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