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Confessions of a Converted Lecturer: Eric Mazur

Confessions of a Converted Lecturer: Eric Mazur

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Confabulation In psychology, confabulation (verb: confabulate) is a memory disturbance, defined as the production of fabricated, distorted or misinterpreted memories about oneself or the world, without the conscious intention to deceive.[1] Confabulation is distinguished from lying as there is no intent to deceive and the person is unaware the information is false.[2] Although individuals can present blatantly false information, confabulation can also seem to be coherent, internally consistent, and relatively normal.[2] Individuals who confabulate present incorrect memories ranging from "subtle alternations to bizarre fabrications",[3] and are generally very confident about their recollections, despite contradictory evidence.[4] Most known cases of confabulation are symptomatic of brain damage or dementias, such as aneurysm, Alzheimer's disease, or Wernicke–Korsakoff syndrome (a common manifestation of thiamine deficiency caused by alcoholism).[5] Two types of confabulation are often distinguished:

Eric Mazur on new interactive teaching techniques In 1990, after seven years of teaching at Harvard, Eric Mazur, now Balkanski professor of physics and applied physics, was delivering clear, polished lectures and demonstrations and getting high student evaluations for his introductory Physics 11 course, populated mainly by premed and engineering students who were successfully solving complicated problems. Then he discovered that his success as a teacher “was a complete illusion, a house of cards.” The epiphany came via an article in the American Journal of Physics by Arizona State professor David Hestenes. He had devised a very simple test, couched in everyday language, to check students’ understanding of one of the most fundamental concepts of physics—force—and had administered it to thousands of undergraduates in the southwestern United States. Mazur tried the test on his own students. Some soul-searching followed.

The best stats you've ever seen - Hans Rosling Rosling is a passionate advocate for “liberating” publicly-funded data on the Internet. Select one topic area for which country-specific data might be compared (e.g., education, health, food production, the environment, etc.), and identify what you think are the best sources of data in this area on the Internet. Create a guide that lists these sources, and provides a brief review of each. If the administrators of these data repositories are thinking about how users might engage with the data via mobile devices or social media, note this in the review. If the administrators currently aren’t doing anything in these areas, how could mobile devices and social media enhance the user’s experience? Here are a few resources to make learning statistics an interesting experience.

Award Search: Award#1362899 - Advanced Manufacturing Project-Learning in Focused Innovation (AMPLiFI) Award Abstract #1362899 Advanced Manufacturing Project-Learning in Focused Innovation (AMPLiFI) This project is creating a flexible technician education framework that draws on the experience of the National Network Manufacturing Institutes (NNMIs) to prepare the workforce for the advanced manufacturing technical occupations of the future. The framework is being developed and piloted for curricular materials focused on Additive Manufacturing (AM) in a manner that is broadly applicable to technician education programs in other technical areas to be determined under the NNMI program. In addition the framework and associated knowledge, skills and competencies are being built around broadly accepted national and international standards (e.g. ASTM, ISO) in order to ensure broad industry recognition and acceptance.

Peer Instruction Inventor Eric Mazur wins $500,000 Minerva Prize! Eric Mazur, who I had the pleasure of meeting several years ago in his on-campus office, won the Minerva Prize, which is dedicated to rewarding "extraordinary innovation" in teaching. Mazur, a professor of physics at Harvard University, developed the peer instruction method out of frustration with his students’ erroneous conceptions of physics. Too many of them utilized naïve mental models about the physical world in thinking about physics. Mazur wanted them to think like physicists.

DUE - Funding - Widening Implementation & Demonstration of Evidence Based Reforms Widening Implementation & Demonstration of Evidence Based Reforms (WIDER) Solicitation 13-552 The chief goal of WIDER is to transform institutions of higher education into supportive environments for STEM faculty members to substantially increase their use of evidence-based teaching and learning practices. The first recommendation in the Report of the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), "Engage to Excel," is to increase widespread implementation of evidence-based practices in order to increase persistence in STEM and contribute to the goal of producing 1 million additional STEM graduates.

Design for Adult Learning, Teaching and Learning Theory, Feedback Design for adult learning Ideally, the design of a course should allow students to customize the experience to meet their goals and complement their personal learning styles. Leonard and DeLacey draw two observations from an Adult Learning Workshop [*] held at Harvard Business School that are useful to keep in mind when designing enhanced, blended or fully-online courses: students who already know the power of a classroom experience will not easily abandon that model for something new; because humans have "certain, predictable preferences and capabilities in learning," some principles of learning span different academic methods. They offer seven simple, yet valuable ideas that should be incorporated into the design of online courses:

Infographic: See The Daily Routines Of The World's Most Famous Creative People We tend to imagine writers, painters, and composers burning the midnight oil, skipping meals, and working feverishly when true inspiration strikes. In fact, Tchaikovsky and Charles Dickens got plenty of Zs each night. Immanuel Kant made a point of visiting the pub every day. And Auden, Milton, and Beethoven kept precise work schedules. These details are catalogued in Creative Routines, an infographic from Info We Trust about the schedules of accomplished creatives. The poster draws on data from Daily Rituals: How Artists Work by Mason Currey about how 161 geniuses—from Jane Austen to Andy Warhol—spent their time.

Forgotten Knowledge: How Memory Works, and to Improve Yours (Infographic) Just in case you forgot, our memories are an integral part of our lives and experiences, and enrich our existence. They let us remember “the good old days,” the incredible times spent with family and friends, and enjoy special moments over and over. And while we may think of our best memories, like a first date or a game winning shot, as a single event, they are actually complex constructions of multiple memories, strung together. But memories aren’t forever. Loss of memories can occur from things like aging, disease, trauma and even intoxication and some medications.

Antidepressants plus blood thinners cause brain cancer cells to eat themselves in mice Scientists have been exploring the connection between tricyclic antidepressants and brain cancer since the early 2000s. There's some evidence that the drugs can lower one's risk for developing aggressive glioblastomas, but when given to patients after diagnosis in a small clinical trial, the antidepressants showed no effect as a treatment. In a study appearing in Cancer Cell on September 24, Swiss researchers find that antidepressants work against brain cancer by excessively increasing tumor autophagy (a process that causes the Cancer Cells to eat themselves). The scientists next combined the antidepressants with blood thinners—also known to increase autophagy—as a treatment for mice with the first stages of human glioblastoma.

Bloom's Digital Taxonomy This is the introduction to Bloom's Digital Taxonomy. The different taxonomical levels can be viewed individually via the navigation bar or below this introduction as embedded pages. This is an update to Bloom's Revised Taxonomy which attempts to account for the new behaviours and actions emerging as technology advances and becomes more ubiquitous.

Maps & Visualizations gallery Here’s an incomplete gallery with links to some data visualizations and maps I’ve made: many are interactive, so you’ll need to click through through for the full experience. Ghost shipping paths Probably the most widely-circulated image I’ve made is this chart that shows the paths of ships taken from the US Maury collection of the government’s database of ship’s paths. I made it to illustrate how rich metadata alone can be as a source for historical research: it’s also just an interesting way to see the continents through large-scale patterns of behavior. Why Is the Research on Learning Styles Still Being Dismissed by Some Learning Leaders and Practitioners? I have been battling the notion of "designing instruction for learning styles" in my own quixotic fashion for a couple of decades now. In my attempt to be a good steward of my clients' shareholders' equity I wished to help them avoid faddish instructional design practices that have been disproven by empirical research. I first learned back in the 1980s at NSPI (now ISPI) conferences that while self-reported learning style preferences do exist, that designing instruction to accommodate them has no basis.