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Dan Gilbert: Why we make bad decisions

Dan Gilbert: Why we make bad decisions

http://www.ted.com/talks/dan_gilbert_researches_happiness

Related:  TED TalksTo Read - Understanding PeopleKnowing and Decision Making

Plato’s Allegory of the Cave - Alex Gendler Want to read the Allegory of the Cave in its complete format? Go to this site and get started. To better understand the allegory’s larger context, try reading the rest of The Republic by Plato and these classic lectures. Then, check out this modern scientific interpretation of what it tells us about human knowledge. Want to see two different visual representations of this allegory?

How A Woman's Plan To Kill Herself Helped Her Family Grieve Maria Fabrizio for NPR This story is in no way an endorsement of suicide. It's a description of one woman's choice and what came of it. Five years ago, after doctors told her that she had Alzheimer's disease that would eventually steal her ability to read, write and recognize people, Sandy Bem decided to kill herself. Sandy was 65 years old, an unsentimental woman and strong willed. The Science of Your Racist Brain Neuroscientist David Amodio on subconscious racial prejudice and why we're still responsible for our actions. —Indre Viskontas and Chris Mooney on Fri. May 9, 2014 6:00 AM PDT On positive psychology - Martin Seligman Seligman believes that there are three different types of happy lives: the pleasant life, the engaged life, and the meaningful life. Create an infographic explaining the three lives. The infographic should include a spokesperson who seems to represent each type of life; this could be someone you know, celebrity, a historical figure, or a character from TV, movies, or literature. Try what Seligman calls the “Gratitude Visit” [16:53].

TAILOPEZ.COM The 'no mistake' fast track is what we all want to be on. Because as the Dutch say, "We are too soon old, and too late smart." Steve Jobs was right when he said, "I didn't want to be the richest man in the graveyard." It's not enough to just be successful. How memories form and how we lose them - Catharine Young Memory: It isn’t just something, it's everything. And although scientists have pursued and puzzled over it for centuries, a definitive explanation of the actual memory process still eludes us--partly because our brain is so incredibly complex (it is made up of approximately 90 billion cells after all!). Let’s take a look at the basic neuroanatomy elements, which makes memory possible. Brain cells, called neurons are the core component of the nervous system and have the remarkable ability to communicate with each other and transfer information. They are able to accomplish through a process called synaptic transmission. Neurons release specialized proteins called neurotransmitters that travel through the space connecting each other together called synapses, and bind to specific proteins called receptors.

A Different Path to Fighting Addiction Photo When their son had to take a medical leave from college, Jack and Wendy knew they — and he — needed help with his binge drinking. Their son’s psychiatrist, along with a few friends, suggested Alcoholics Anonymous. The Germ Theory of Democracy, Dictatorship, and Your Cherished Beliefs One morning last fall, the evolutionary biologist Randy Thornhill was standing with me in front of the gorilla enclosure at the Albuquerque zoo. He was explaining a new theory about the origins of human culture when Mashudu, a 10-year-old western lowland gorilla, decided to help illustrate a point. In a very deliberate way, Mashudu sauntered over to the deep cement ravine at the front of his enclosure, perched his rear end over the edge, and did his morning business.

Who was Confucius? - Bryan W. Van Norden The philosopher Karl Jaspers said that Confucius, Jesus, Socrates, and the Buddha were similar in that each was an “axial figure” in one of the world’s great philosophical or religious traditions, yet we know almost no indisputable facts about any of them. Consequently, almost everything about the life of Confucius (as with Jesus, Socrates, or the Buddha) is controversial. Most of the quotations you hear attributed to Confucius are made up. Can prison be a place of redemption? In 1991, Shaka Senghor shot and killed a man. Yes, his is a story of atonement and rehabilitation — but it didn’t always look like things would go that way. As he says in his TED Talk, for many of his 19 years in prison, he was bitter, angry and unwilling to take responsibility for his actions.

What a Plant Knows by Maria Popova How a plant can tell whether you’re wearing a blue or red shirt as you’re approaching it. As I was planting my seasonal crop of tomatoes last month, a good friend (and my personal gardening guru) informed me that they liked their leaves rubbed, “like petting a pet’s ears,” which I received with equal parts astonishment, amusement, and mild concern for my friend. But, as Tel Aviv University biologist Daniel Chamovitz reveals in What a Plant Knows: A Field Guide to the Senses (public library), that might not be such a crazy idea after all. Make the most of your 20s: Meg Jay at TED2013 In her 20s, Meg Jay saw her first psychotherapy client, Alex, who was there to talk about her guy problems. Jay didn’t take the sessions all too seriously at first. But then her supervisor gave her a wakeup call.

The Science of Sleep: Dreaming, Depression, and How REM Sleep Regulates Negative Emotions by Maria Popova “Memory is never a precise duplicate of the original… it is a continuing act of creation. Dream images are the product of that creation.”

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