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Terraforming

Terraforming
Transplanting seas to inland ocean lakes? A good idea for the Middle East? The two century-old and highly respected Japanese engineering giant Shimizu has hatched a wild and crazy proposal to rehabilitate the desert for human use. Their idea is to move vast amounts of seawater along canals that would track deep into desert landmasses to create a series of connected huge inland seas measuring 30 km (18 miles) across. Small cities could then be created within the gigantic seawater “lakes,” on artificial islands. Each seawater lake with its city would spaced apart along connecting canals measuring 150 km (93 miles) between each seawater lake city. A similarly massive water project initiated by Libya transfers fresh water from a distant underground aquifer. By contrast, this project uses seawater, already on the surface. The seawater itself in the lakes could support fish farming, which would bring a source of protein into arid deserts. Image:Shimizu Corporation ::Shimizu Corporation Related:  Future

The Secret Life of Plants It means even on the lower levels of life, there is a profound consciousness or awareness that bonds all things together. Published in 1973, The Secret Life of Plants was written by Peter Tompkins and Christopher Bird. It is described as “A fascinating account of the physical, emotional, and spiritual relations between plants and man.” Essentially, the subject of the book is the idea that plants may be sentient, despite their lack of a nervous system and a brain. This sentience is observed primarily through changes in the plant’s conductivity, as through a polygraph, as pioneered by Cleve Backster. The book also contains a summary of Goethe’s theory of plant metamorphosis. That said, this book is about much more than just plants; it delves quite deeply into such topics as the aura, psychophysics, orgone, radionics, kirlian photography, magnetism/magnetotropism, bioelectrics, dowsing, and the history of science.

With electronic contact lenses, bionic eyesight could become reality A new generation of contact lenses built with tiny circuits and LEDs could make bionic eyesight a reality. Researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle have created contact lenses with built-in electronics and an LED, powered wirelessly by RF. "These lenses don’t give us the vision of an eagle or the benefit of running subtitles on our surroundings yet," University of Washington professor Babak Parviz writes in IEEE Spectrum. "What we’ve done so far barely hints at what will soon be possible with this technology." While conventional contact lenses are polymers formed in various shapes to correct faulty vision, electronic contact lenses are far more "engineered." Parviz writes: To turn such a lens into a functional system, we integrate control circuits, communication circuits, and miniature antennas into the lens using custom-built optoelectronic components. Even the Internet is possible, Parviz writes: There are still hurdles. Sep 2, 2009

Your Sky by John Walker Welcome to Your Sky, the interactive planetarium of the Web. You can produce maps in the forms described below for any time and date, viewpoint, and observing location. If you enter the orbital elements of an asteroid or comet, Your Sky will compute its current position and plot it on the map. Your Sky provides three ways to view the sky with links, where appropriate, among the various presentations. Sky Map The sky map shows the entire sky as viewed from a given location at a specified time and date. To make a sky map, enter the latitude and longitude of your observing site in the boxes below (be sure to check the correct “North/South” and “East/West” settings) and press the “Make Sky Map” button below the form. Horizon Views Horizon Views, showing the stars above the horizon as seen from a specified observing site at a given date and time. The Virtual Telescope Your Sky's Virtual Telescope is your Humble Soft Telescope of the Web. Your Sky help Related Software On the Web:

Isaac Asimov’s 1964 Predictions About 2014 Are Frighteningly Accurate In 1964, famed science fiction writer Isaac Asimov ventured a guess at what you might find if you set foot inside the 2014 World’s Fair. Using his gift for envisioning future technology, Asimov’s predictions from 50 years out are both stunningly accurate and perhaps a little bit depressing. Here’s a look at what he got right. “One thought that occurs to me is that men will continue to withdraw from nature in order to create an environment that will suit them better.” “Kitchen units will be devised that will prepare “automeals,” heating water and converting it to coffee” “Complete lunches and dinners, with the food semiprepared, will be stored in the freezer until ready for processing.” “The appliances of 2014 will have no electric cords, of course” “Much effort will be put into the designing of vehicles with “Robot-brains” “Vehicles that can be set for particular destinations and that will then proceed there without interference by the slow reflexes of a human driver.” Buzzfeed.com Comments

Sound Healers Association History of the Sound Healers Association The Sound Healers Association was founded in 1982 as an organization dedicated to the research and awareness of the uses of sound and music as therapeutic and transformational modalities. The work that began in the pioneering meetings described below continues to expand today. The SOUND HEALERS LETTERS A historical perspective by Jonathan Goldman The Sound Healers Association (formally New England Sound Healers) met monthly from the beginning of 1982 through 1989. Several years ago, I was fortunate to come across a long missing manuscript that among other things, contained the monthly letters I had sent out announcing upcoming meetings and reporting on past meetings. First, these letters chronicle the events that occurred during these meetings. Second, you’ll really see how a small grassroots energy form began to expand over the years. The following are the first three letters as written in their entirety. Sincerely, Jonathan Goldman

Smart Fridge by Ashley Legg Smart Fridge Is Your New Recipe Card The Smart Fridge here is for those who have shunted cooking to a hobby and rely more on designer microwave meals. The idea is to give you a fridge that is intelligent enough to come up with a healthy recipe, depending on what you stock in it. Not only that, it guides you with vocal instructions, spoon by spoon, till you dish out the perfect-wholesome meal. A touch interface door glams up the appliance, creating the desire to own a piece that’s futuristic but may not be what you’re looking for! Designer: Ashley Legg

The Open Biomedical Ontologies Print - 110 Predictions For the Next 110 Years · People will be fluent in every language. With DARPA and Google racing to perfect instant translation, it won't be long until your cellphone speaks Swahili on your behalf. · Software will predict traffic jams before they occur. Using archived data, roadside sensors, and GPS, IBM has come up with a modeling program that anticipates bumper-to-bumper congestion a full hour before it begins. Better yet, the idea proved successful in early tests—even on the Jersey Turnpike. · Climate-controlled jackets will protect soldiers from extreme heat and cold. · Nanoparticles will make chemotherapy far more effective. · Electric cars will roam (some) highways. · Athletes will employ robotic trainers. · Bridges will repair themselves with self-healing concrete. · Digital "ants" will protect the U.S. power grid from cyber attacks. · Scrolls will replace tablets. Your Car Will Be Truly Connected · Your genome will be sequenced before you are born. 10 Things That Will Remain the Same

Tractor Beam Technology @CoffinDodger (If the typos crap. Blame my keyboard): Reminds me of the movie "The Forgotten " When people got yanked into the sky. It was awesome..I screamed lol. @Kenny Stancil: Ive seen 'The Forgotten' and I completly see where your coming from. I think on an industrial scale, this has the potential to be as cool as the tractor beams on the USS Eterprise. @CoffinDodger (If the typos crap. I know, it's SO much easier when we do it that way. ;)- The Chinese Room Argument 1. Overview Work in Artificial Intelligence (AI) has produced computer programs that can beat the world chess champion and defeat the best human players on the television quiz show Jeopardy. AI has also produced programs with which one can converse in natural language, including Apple's Siri. Our experience shows that playing chess or Jeopardy, and carrying on a conversation, are activities that require understanding and intelligence. Does computer prowess at challenging games and conversation then show that computers can understand and be intelligent? Searle argues that a good way to test a theory of mind, say a theory that holds that understanding can be created by doing such and such, is to imagine what it would be like to do what the theory says would create understanding. Imagine a native English speaker who knows no Chinese locked in a room full of boxes of Chinese symbols (a data base) together with a book of instructions for manipulating the symbols (the program). 2. 17. 3. 4.

Surprising Sea Slug Is Half-plant, Half-animal A green sea slug appears to be part animal, part plant. It's the first critter discovered to produce the plant pigment chlorophyll. The sneaky slugs seem to have stolen the genes that enable this skill from algae that they've eaten. "They can make their energy-containing molecules without having to eat anything," said Sidney Pierce, a biologist at the University of South Florida in Tampa. Pierce has been studying the unique creatures, officially called Elysia chlorotica, for about 20 years. "This is the first time that multicellar animals have been able to produce chlorophyll," Pierce told LiveScience. The sea slugs live in salt marshes in New England and Canada. "We collect them and we keep them in aquaria for months," Pierce said. The researchers used a radioactive tracer to be sure that the slugs are actually producing the chlorophyll themselves, as opposed to just stealing the ready-made pigment from algae.

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