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Understanding MARC Bibliographic: Machine-Readable Cataloging

Understanding MARC Bibliographic: Machine-Readable Cataloging
Understanding MARC Bibliographic: Machine-Readable Cataloging Written by Betty Furrie in conjunction with the Data Base Development Department of The Follett Software Company Eighth edition reviewed and edited by the Network Development and MARC Standards Office, Library of Congress Published by the Network Development and MARC Standards Office, Library of Congress Available from: Copyright ©2009 The Library of Congress, except within the U.S.A. Understanding MARC Bibliographic was a copyrighted work originally published by the Follett Software Co. in 1988. Related:  dlnieman

Library As of July 1, 2013 ThinkQuest has been discontinued. We would like to thank everyone for being a part of the ThinkQuest global community: Students - For your limitless creativity and innovation, which inspires us all. Teachers - For your passion in guiding students on their quest. Partners - For your unwavering support and evangelism. Parents - For supporting the use of technology not only as an instrument of learning, but as a means of creating knowledge. We encourage everyone to continue to “Think, Create and Collaborate,” unleashing the power of technology to teach, share, and inspire. Best wishes, The Oracle Education Foundation MARC standards MARC (MAchine-Readable Cataloging) standards are a set of digital formats for the description of items catalogued by libraries, such as books. It was developed by Henriette Avram[1] at the US Library of Congress during the 1960s to create records that can be used by computers, and to share those records among libraries. By 1971, MARC formats had become the national standard for dissemination of bibliographic data in the United States, and the international standard by 1973. There are several versions of MARC in use around the world, the most predominant being MARC 21, created in 1999 as a result of the harmonization of U.S. and Canadian MARC formats, and UNIMARC, widely used in Europe. Record structure and field designations[edit] The MARC standards define three aspects of a MARC record: the field designations within each record, the structure of the record, and the actual content of the record itself. Field designations[edit] Record structure[edit] Content[edit] MARC formats[edit]

Welcome - AMICUS - Library and Archives Canada Welcome to AMICUS, the Canadian national catalogue available free of charge. As a national catalogue, AMICUS not only shows the published materials held at Library and Archives Canada (LAC) but also those located in over 700 libraries across Canada. Please note that the National Union Catalogue contains the holdings of libraries that choose to participate. Use AMICUS to find where the item you need is located. Special Libraries Cataloguing, Inc. Online public access catalog An online public access catalog (often abbreviated as OPAC or simply library catalog) is an online database of materials held by a library or group of libraries. Users search a library catalog principally to locate books and other material available at a library. History[edit] Early online catalogs[edit] Although a handful of experimental systems existed as early as the 1960s, the first large-scale online catalogs were developed at Ohio State University in 1975 and the Dallas Public Library in 1978.[1] These and other early online catalog systems tended to closely reflect the card catalogs that they were intended to replace.[2] Using a dedicated terminal or telnet client, users could search a handful of pre-coordinate indexes and browse the resulting display in much the same way they had previously navigated the card catalog. Throughout the 1980s, the number and sophistication of online catalogs grew. Stagnation and dissatisfaction[edit] Next-generation catalogs[edit] Union catalogs[edit]

Expert advice on cataloguing and RDA RDA: Resource, Description and Access Print 2013 Revision Designed for the digital world and an expanding universe of metadata users, RDA: Resource Description and Access is the new, unified cataloguing standard. This full-text print version of RDA offers a snapshot that serves as an offline access point to help solo and part-time cataloguers evaluate RDA, as well as to support training and classroom use in any size institution. The 2013 RDA Print Revision contains: A full accumulation of RDA The most current RDA Reworded RDA. Find out more information and order a copy

"Do We" Really Know Dewey? As of July 1, 2013 ThinkQuest has been discontinued. We would like to thank everyone for being a part of the ThinkQuest global community: Students - For your limitless creativity and innovation, which inspires us all. Teachers - For your passion in guiding students on their quest. Partners - For your unwavering support and evangelism. Parents - For supporting the use of technology not only as an instrument of learning, but as a means of creating knowledge. We encourage everyone to continue to “Think, Create and Collaborate,” unleashing the power of technology to teach, share, and inspire. Best wishes, The Oracle Education Foundation Cataloging Cataloging (or cataloguing) is the process of listing something for inclusion in a catalog. In library and information science, the process encompasses the production of bibliographic descriptions of books as well as other types of discovery tools for documents. Today cataloging study and practice has broadened and merged with that of metadata ("data about data contents"), increasingly associated with Resource Description and Access.[1] A handwritten subject card from the National Library of Medicine’s old card catalog recalls the precomputer days when information had to be created, classified, and sorted by hand. Cataloging rules[edit] Cataloging rules have been defined to allow for consistent cataloging of various library materials across several persons of a cataloging team and across time. Library items that are written in a foreign script are, in some cases, transliterated to the script of the catalog. Standards[edit] Common Communication Format[edit] Descriptive cataloging[edit]

Joint Steering Committee for Development of RDA: RDA Background RDA: Resource Description and Access was developed by JSC as part of its strategic plan (2005-2009) to replace the Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules, 2nd Edition Revised, which were first published in 1978. RDA provides a set of guidelines and instructions on formulating data to support resource discovery. RDA provides a comprehensive set of guidelines and instructions covering all types of content and media. Details of how to subscribe to the RDA Toolkit can be found on the publisher’s website. For a brief summary of RDA see the RDA Brochure (PDF format). Work on the new standard began in 2004, and in the same year the Committee of Principals for AACR (CoP) appointed Tom Delsey as the Editor. RDA: Resource Description and Access is developed in a collaborative process led by the Joint Steering Committee for Development of RDA. JSC Aggregates Working Group (2015– ) Chair [not yet named] See terms of reference of the JSC Aggregates Working Group. Editor of RDA (2004–2009) Tom Delsey

Understanding Call Numbers Understanding Call Numbers Reading To be able to efficiently read Library of Congress (LC) call numbers is quite a skill. This tutorial was created to help library users uncover the mysteries of call number reading. Let's start with a sample call number: Call numbers can begin with one, two, or three letters. The first letter of a call number represents one of the 21 major divisions of the LC System. Numbers after letters. The first set of numbers in a call number help to define a book's subject. "534.2" in the example teaches us more about the book's subject. Cutter Number The cutter number is a coded representation of the author or organization's name or the title of the work (also known as the "Main Entry" in library-lingo). Shelving and Locating Items are shelved by call numbers - in both alphabetical and numerical order. The cutter numbers (A3, A31, Z4, C3, and A2 in the above example) are sorted first by the letter and then by the number as a decimal.

OCLC See Wikipedia:OCLC for its use in Wikipedia. Online Computer Library Center, Inc. (OCLC) is "a nonprofit, membership, computer library service and research organization dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world’s information and reducing information costs".[2] Founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center, OCLC and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world. History[edit] Originally named the Ohio College Library Center, OCLC began in 1967 through a collaboration of Ohio university presidents, vice presidents, and library directors who wanted to create a cooperative, computerized network for Ohio libraries. Bearing the Cost[edit] The cost of implementing OCLC in the late 1960s was extraordinarily high by today's standards. At the time, university libraries around the country were constructing central libraries and shutting down their branch libraries—mathematics, biology, etc.

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