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Historical Timeline of Public Education in the US

Historical Timeline of Public Education in the US
1647The General Court of the Massachusetts Bay Colony decrees that every town of fifty families should have an elementary school and that every town of 100 families should have a Latin school. The goal is to ensure that Puritan children learn to read the Bible and receive basic information about their Calvinist religion. 1779Thomas Jefferson proposes a two-track educational system, with different tracks in his words for "the laboring and the learned." Scholarship would allow a very few of the laboring class to advance, Jefferson says, by "raking a few geniuses from the rubbish." 1785The Continental Congress (before the U.S. Constitution was ratified) passes a law calling for a survey of the "Northwest Territory" which included what was to become the state of Ohio. 1790Pennsylvania state constitution calls for free public education but only for poor children. 1805New York Public School Society formed by wealthy businessmen to provide education for poor children. 1896Plessy v.

https://www.raceforward.org/research/reports/historical-timeline-public-education-us

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