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The Plants of the Rainforest

The Plants of the Rainforest
A tropical greenhouse More than two thirds of the world's plant species are found in the tropical rainforests: plants that provide shelter and food for rainforest animals as well as taking part in the gas exchanges which provide much of the world's oxygen supply. Rainforest plants live in a warm humid environment that allows an enormous variation rare in more temperate climates: some like the orchids have beautiful flowers adapted to attract the profusion of forest insects. Competition at ground level for light and food has lead to evolution of plants which live on the branches of other plants, or even strangle large trees to fight for survival. The aerial plants often gather nourishment from the air itself using so-called 'air roots';. The humidity of the rainforest encourages such adaptations which would be impossible in most temperate forests with their much drier conditions.

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Earth Floor: Biomes Tropical Rainforest: Plants Although tropical rainforests receive 12 hours of sunlight daily, less than 2% of that sunlight ever reaches the ground. The tropical rainforest has dense vegetation, often forming three different layers--the canopy, the understory, and the ground layer. Frequently, people think of the tropical rainforest as a "jungle" where plant growth is dense even at ground level. However, the canopy created by the tall trees (100-120 feet) and the understory, prevents sunlight from reaching the ground. The soil is, therefore, always shaded, and very little vegetation is able to survive at ground level.

Animals Often Seen Advertisement. EnchantedLearning.com is a user-supported site. As a bonus, site members have access to a banner-ad-free version of the site, with print-friendly pages.Click here to learn more. (Already a member? Helpful Plants Tropical Rainforest Resources Edible Rainforest Plants Allspice: (Pimenta dioica) Berries-- shaped like peppercorns-- of an evergreen tree which can grow up to 100' in height in height in the Latin American Rainforest. What Animals Live In The Amazon Rainforest? - WorldAtlas.com The Amazon Rainforest, also known as the Amazonia or the Amazon Jungle, is the largest rainforest on earth and is home to 427 mammals (e.g. jaguar, sloth, and river dolphin), 1,300 birds (e.g. macaw ), 378 reptiles (e.g. anaconda and Jesus lizard ), more than 400 amphibians (e.g. glass frog and poison dart frog). It covers 40% of the South American continent and can be found within the following countries: Peru, Ecuador, Columbia, Venezuela, Brazil, Bolivia, Guyana, Suriname as well as in French Guiana, a department of France. The Amazon consists of several ecosystems and vegetation types and is very species-rich. One in ten known species in the world lives in the Amazon Rainforest as do one in five known bird species.

Ten Amazing Rainforest Plants Our surroundings are sometimes taken for granted. Even something as unique as the rainforest is forgotten. It seems a little bit of knowledge and a shove in the right direction can get people to appreciate the environment. So, why not start with the wonder that is the rainforest? Even though rainforests only cover less than two percent of the Earth’s entire surface area, they are home to 50 percent of the plants and animals. Rare Plant The rain forests of the world are estimated by scientists to contain 80% of the green flowering plants in existence and it is estimated that 2.5 acres of tropical rainforest may contain more than 750 types of trees and 1500 species of higher plants. With the loss of each acre of rainforest to farming, logging or other form s of development, hundreds of species disappear forever. The number of endangered rain forest plants is vast and rather than attempt to list every known species of plant that is endangered only two of the better known ones will be presented here.

Avarage Weather The tropical rain forest is a forest of tall trees in a region of year-round warmth. An average of 50 to 260 inches (125 to 660 cm.) of rain falls yearly. Rain forests belong to the tropical wet climate group. The temperature in a rain forest rarely gets higher than 93 °F (34 °C) or drops below 68 °F (20 °C); average humidity is between 77 and 88%; rainfall is often more than 100 inches a year. There is usually a brief season of less rain. In monsoonal areas, there is a real dry season. National Geographic In Brazil, which houses 30 percent of the remaining tropical rain forest on Earth, more than 50,000 square miles of rain forest were lost to deforestation between 2000 and 2005. Biologists worry about the long-term consequences. Drought may be one. Some rain forests, including the Amazon, began experiencing drought in the 1990s, possibly due to deforestation and global warming. Efforts to discourage deforestation, mainly through sustainable-logging initiatives, are underway on a very limited basis but have had a negligible impact so far. The rain forest is nearly self-watering.

Rainforests Facts Facts about Rainforests Do you know how many tropical rainforest plants have been identified as having anti-cancer properties? Or how many continents around the world contain rainforests? And just how quickly are the world's rainforests disappearing? Find out the answers to these questions and more as you check out these interesting rainforest facts! Dangerous Animals The Amazon Rainforest is one of the world’s fascinating places. Its lush greenness is unlike anywhere else on Earth and for centuries, it has drawn travelers looking for adventure to it. Rainforests are associated with a feeling of calmness, and “Rainforest Sounds” CDs are bestsellers for anyone wanting relaxation music. You’d be forgiven for thinking it’s an oasis of tranquility and peacefulness.

Cold Tempetures Updated January 11, 2009 A rainforest is a forest differentiated by high levels of precipitation - normally a minimum of at least 68-78 inches (172-198 cm) annually. Rainforests tend to have fairly mild and/or warm climates and feature the highest levels of biodiversity in the world. Additionally, tropical rainforests are considered the "lungs of the Earth" because of the high amount of photosynthesis occurring in them.

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