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Rainy season brings glow-in-the-dark mushrooms

Rainy season brings glow-in-the-dark mushrooms
24 May 2006 With the arrival of Japan's rainy season, a mysterious type of green, glow-in-the-dark mushroom begins to sprout in Wakayama prefecture. The Mycena lux-coeli mushrooms, known locally as shii no tomobishi-dake (literally, "chinquapin glow mushrooms"), sprout from fallen chinquapin trees. As they grow, a chemical reaction involving luciferin (a light-emitting pigment contained within the mushrooms) occurs, causing them to glow a ghostly green. The luminescent mushrooms were long believed to be indigenous solely to Tokyo's Hachijojima Island after they were discovered there in the early 1950s. In 1995, however, mycologists found the fungus growing wild in coastal areas of the southern Kii peninsula, as well as in Kyushu and other areas. The mushrooms thrive in humid environments, popping up during Japan's rainy season, which typically lasts from the end of May to July. [Source: Mainichi Shimbun]

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Cyber's Cheep CD-Spindle Grow Tek I orginally did this for fun, It makes a nice simple little grow that is easily hidden. You will need a 1 pint colonized grain jar to make this work. Things you will need 100 CDR spindle, I think everyone that has a CD burner has a few of these laying around! Duck Tape and Knife Spray bottle of distilled water Spray bottle of alcohol

Basidium Schematic showing a basidiomycete mushroom, gill structure, and spore-bearing basidia on the gill margins. A basidium (pl., basidia) is a microscopic, spore-producing structure found on the hymenophore of fruiting bodies of basidiomycete fungi. The presence of basidia is one of the main characteristic features of the Basidiomycota. A basidium usually bears four sexual spores called basidiospores; occasionally the number may be two or even eight.

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Conidium Conidia on conidiophores Conidia, sometimes termed asexual chlamydospores, or chlamydoconida [1] are asexual,[2] non-motile spores of a fungus and are named after the Greek word for dust, skoni. They are also called mitospores due to the way they are generated through the cellular process of mitosis. The two new haploid cells are genetically identical to the haploid parent, and can develop into new organisms if conditions are favorable, and serve in biological dispersal. Psilocybe Cyanescens One of my new discoveries of the magic our world has to offer is this new friend of mine "Psilocybe Cyanescens" (cyan-type of blue, escens- essence) who's spirit I found in the high peaking parks of San Francisco. Or like others say "the mushroom founds you". Luckily a mushroom guru friend of mine had given me a tour and explained me all the safe basics needed to know in hunting, finding and harvesting a REAL Psilocybe Cyanescens mushroom fresh from San Francisco! My new love and hobby is to go on daily mushroom hunts and to revisit my gardens to pick more mushrooms every couple days.