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Rainy season brings glow-in-the-dark mushrooms

Rainy season brings glow-in-the-dark mushrooms
24 May 2006 With the arrival of Japan's rainy season, a mysterious type of green, glow-in-the-dark mushroom begins to sprout in Wakayama prefecture. The Mycena lux-coeli mushrooms, known locally as shii no tomobishi-dake (literally, "chinquapin glow mushrooms"), sprout from fallen chinquapin trees. As they grow, a chemical reaction involving luciferin (a light-emitting pigment contained within the mushrooms) occurs, causing them to glow a ghostly green. The luminescent mushrooms were long believed to be indigenous solely to Tokyo's Hachijojima Island after they were discovered there in the early 1950s. The mushrooms thrive in humid environments, popping up during Japan's rainy season, which typically lasts from the end of May to July. [Source: Mainichi Shimbun] Related:  Fungal BiologyMush Room

Magic Mushrooms may have Cure for Depression Drawings on LSD These drawings were done as part of a CIA experiment aimed at determining the effects of LSD on the human body. The drawings are incredibly fascinating, particularly due to the progression of style that occurs throughout the experiment. They administered 100ul of LSD to the artist and gave the artist free access to an activity box full of crayons. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Fin. I particularly enjoy how from minutes 150 – 155 his drawings become far worse, then all of a sudden he is amazing. What are your thoughts?

Rare ‘Devil’s Cigar’ fungus discovered in Nara One of the world's rarest fungi, an exotic star-shaped mushroom known to exist at only three locations on Earth, has been discovered in the mountains of Nara prefecture. The Devil's Cigar (a.k.a. "Texas Star") -- known to botanists as Chorioactis geaster -- had been observed only in central Texas and at two remote locations in Japan prior to the recent discovery in Nara. The peculiar fungus is described as a dark brown cigar-shaped capsule that transforms into a tan-colored star when it splits open to release its spores. It is also one of only a few known fungi that produce an audible hiss when releasing spores. First reported in 1893 in Austin, Texas, the curious mushroom appears in a limited area of central Texas each year, and until now, the rare sightings in Japan have occurred in forests in Miyazaki and Kochi prefectures. The recent Nara discovery was made by Masakuni Kimura, curator of a natural history museum in the town of Kawakami (Nara prefecture).

Basidiospore Basidiomycetes form sexual spores externally from a structure called a basidium. Four basidiospores develop on appendages from each basidium. These spores serve as the main air dispersal units for the fungi. The spores are released during periods of high humidity and generally have a night-time or pre-dawn peak concentration in the atmosphere. When basidiospores encounter a favorable substrate, they may germinate, typically by forming hyphae. General structure and shape[edit] Basidiospores are generally characterized by an attachment peg (called a hilar appendage) on its surface. Potential opportunist and Pathogen: Depend on genus. Industrial uses: Edible mushrooms are used in the food industry. Potential Toxins produced: Amanitins, monomethyl-hydrazine, muscarine, ibotenic acid, psilocybin. Basidiospores are the result of sexual reproduction and formed on a structure called the basidium. References[edit]

How To Get High Off Nutmeg Ever since recent news reports, many have been asking how to get high off nutmeg . This trend is not new, hippies were doing it back around 40 years ago. They stopped because the cons outweighed the pros and the spice proved to be an unpleasant experience for the most part. Thanks to mainstream media the fad is back, and kids all over the country have been using nutmeg to get high again. Image via Wikipedia The following steps will surely assist you in getting high off nutmeg. An overdose of nutmeg can cause death or serious health problems resulting in hospitalization Preparatory Steps: 1. 3. I give you these steps hoping you will not get high on nutmeg. The effects don’t start to come on until about 4 hours after ingestion. Make sure to head over to the nutmeg experience afterward.

Mushrooms, Fungi, Mycology Basidium Schematic showing a basidiomycete mushroom, gill structure, and spore-bearing basidia on the gill margins. A basidium (pl., basidia) is a microscopic, spore-producing structure found on the hymenophore of fruiting bodies of basidiomycete fungi. The presence of basidia is one of the main characteristic features of the Basidiomycota. A basidium usually bears four sexual spores called basidiospores; occasionally the number may be two or even eight. In a typical basidium, each basidiospore is borne at the tip of a narrow prong or horn called a sterigma (pl. sterigmata), and is forcibly discharged upon maturity. Basidium structure[edit] Mechanism of basidiospore discharge[edit] In most basidiomycetes, the basidiospores are ballistospores--they are forcibly discharged. Upon maturity of a basidiospore, sugars present in the cell wall begin to serve as condensation loci for water vapor in the air. Evolutionary loss of forcible discharge[edit] References[edit] Ingold, C.T. 1998. External links[edit]

The Most Addictive Drugs in the World Many people think that heroin is the most addictive drug in the world. The truth is, that although heroin is one of the most dangerous drugs in the world, it is NOT the most addictive. You may be surprised to learn that some of the drugs the experts have found to be most addictive are actually legal. The most addictive drugs Nicotine. Caffeine. Heroin. Cocaine. Alcohol. For the most part, those with alcohol and drug addiction are unlikely to admit, on their own, that they have a problem. Obviously, some of the substances listed above are more dangerous than others. At Michael’s House, we treat individuals who have seen their life take a wrong turn as a result of drug addiction. For addiction treatment that gets real results, contact Michael’s House today.

Cyber's Cheep CD-Spindle Grow Tek I orginally did this for fun, It makes a nice simple little grow that is easily hidden. You will need a 1 pint colonized grain jar to make this work. Things you will need 100 CDR spindle, I think everyone that has a CD burner has a few of these laying around! Duck Tape and Knife Spray bottle of distilled water Spray bottle of alcohol Sterile spoon plastic wrap Vermiculite 1/4 cup measuring cup a bowl and a colonized pint of WBS OK Lets start. Next you want to use the ducktape and cover 3" of the bottom of the spindle This works out to be a layer starting at the bottom with a second layer 1/2 over the first. (2" wide ducktape) Don't forget to cover the bottom of the spindle we do not want any light getting in! Take the bottle of alcohol and spray and clean the inside of the spindle. I am using a dental spoon which has been sterilized on an autoclave bag. Mix them in a bowl. Some people will microwave or pasteurize the vermiculite. Now add your vermiculite to bring it up to the tape line.

Basidiocarp Schematic of a typical basidiocarp, showing fruiting body, hymenium and basidia Structure[edit] Types[edit] Basidiocarps of Ramaria rugosa, a coral fungus Basidiocarps are classified into various types of growth forms based on the degree of differentiation into a stipe, pileus, and hymenophore, as well as the type of hymenophore, if present. Growth forms include: Basic divisions of Agaricomycotina were formerly based entirely upon the growth form of the mushroom. See also[edit] Ascocarp External links[edit] Evolution & Morphology in the Homobasidiomycetes: The Clade/Morphology Chart by Gary Lincoff & Michael Wood, MykoWeb, November 27, 2005." FungiPhoto.com Mushroom Photo Catalog Conidium Conidia on conidiophores Conidia, sometimes termed asexual chlamydospores, or chlamydoconida [1] are asexual,[2] non-motile spores of a fungus and are named after the Greek word for dust, skoni. They are also called mitospores due to the way they are generated through the cellular process of mitosis. The two new haploid cells are genetically identical to the haploid parent, and can develop into new organisms if conditions are favorable, and serve in biological dispersal. Asexual reproduction in Ascomycetes (the Phylum Ascomycota) is by the formation of conidia, which are borne on specialized stalks called conidiophores. The morphology of these specialized conidiophores is often distinctive of a specific species and can therefore be used in identification of the species. The terms "microconidia" and "macroconidia" are sometimes used.[3] Conidiogenesis[edit] There are two main types of conidium development:[4] Conidia germination[edit] Structures for release of conidia[7][edit] See also[edit]

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