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Overview | How does George Orwell’s vision of technology and its uses in “1984” compare with today’s reality? How have concerns about privacy and freedom expressed in the novel been manifested in the contemporary world? In this lesson, students compare and contrast the world, people and technologies of “1984” with those of today and create a treatment for a modern film, print or stage adaptation that revolves around current technologies. Materials | Full text of “1984,” computers with Internet access, software for podcasting and projection equipment, copies of the handout “1984” vs. Today (PDF), video cameras and film-editing software (optional) Warm-Up | Give students the following list of words from “1984”: Big BrotherdoublethinkthoughtcrimeNewspeakmemory holeOrwellian Students who have read the novel will recognize their provenance and should define them, as well as give a contemporary example of something that could be described similarly. What does Mr. Related resources: Technology 3.

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4 Sequence – Big Brother is Watching You In this chapter we will be looking at the surveillance society we live in and the consequences it has on our privacy and personal freedom. Take a look at all of these images, what do they have in common? How does the internet affect your life? 321 Free Tools for Teachers - Free Educational Technology Would you be interested in the ultimate list of free tools for teachers? At the following post you will find 321 Free Tools for Teachers separated in 18 educational technology categories. Enjoy!

1984 Book 1, Chapter 1 Summary It all starts on a cold, bright day in April 1984. At 1 p.m., Winston Smith, a small, frail man of 39 years drags himself home for lunch at his apartment on the 7th floor of the Victory Mansions.The face of Big Brother, the leader of the Party and a heavily mustached and ruggedly handsome man of about 45, appears on giant, colorful posters everywhere in Airstrip One, Oceania. (This is still London, though.) 6 News Stories to Connect to Orwell’s 1984 Big brother really is watching you. Today we accept a certain amount of oversight by government and business as a part of daily life. Students know about all the surveillance cameras that follow them as they move about in the world. They realize the U.S. government tracks details on their income and health. They know that online vendors know what they buy and everything they looked at before they decide. They have all heard stories of someone who gets a ticket because of an act caught by a traffic light and toll booth camera.

Nineteen Eighty-four, by George Orwell : chapter1.1 It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen. Winston Smith, his chin nuzzled into his breast in an effort to escape the vile wind, slipped quickly through the glass doors of Victory Mansions, though not quickly enough to prevent a swirl of gritty dust from entering along with him. The hallway smelt of boiled cabbage and old rag mats. At one end of it a coloured poster, too large for indoor display, had been tacked to the wall. It depicted simply an enormous face, more than a metre wide: the face of a man of about forty-five, with a heavy black moustache and ruggedly handsome features.

Essential Apps for Teachers Here are all the direct links to my reviews for my Apps for Teachers: App #1: Music (free) App #2: Dropbox (free) 1984, George Orwell 1984 is about totalitarianism. A totalitarian government is one that tries to control every how people spend every minute of their time, even in private; who they can associate with; what they are allowed . A totalitarian government even tries to control what people think and what they believe. George Orwell wrote the late What he knew about totalitarianism was based on the and . Those governments had come into being not that long before and they were not very well understood yet.What Orwell was trying to do with 1984 was to give his readers a clear picture of what life would be like if a free country like England were under rule. Newspeak Dictionary Newspeak Dictionary Newspeak and other terminology found in Orwell's novel "1984", with some additional words which only appear in the movie. Airstrip One - Formally called England. This term demonstrates Orwell's distain for American influence Europe.

50 Fab Apps for Teachers Less Is More You don’t need a one-to-one classroom (one device for every student) to integrate tablets into instruction. Whether you have one tablet or five, possibilities for teaching with them abound. Single Tablet hero's journey "A Practical Guide to Joseph Cambell’s The Hero with a Thousand Faces" by Christopher Vogler © 1985 “There are only two or three human stories, and they go on repeating themselves as fiercely as if they had never happened before.” In the long run, one of the most influential books of the 20th century may turn out to be Joseph Campbell’s THE HERO WITH A THOUSAND FACES. The book and the ideas in it are having a major impact on writing and story-telling, but above all on movie-making. Filmmakers like John Boorman, George Miller, Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, and Francis Coppola owe their successes in part to the ageless patterns that Joseph Campbell identifies in the book. The ideas Campbell presents in this and other books are an excellent set of analytical tools.

1984 - Download Free eBook The thing that he was about to do was to open a diary. This was not illegal (nothing was illegal, since there were no longer any laws), but if detected it was reasonably certain that it would be punished by death, or at least by twenty-five years in a forced-labour camp. Winston fitted a nib into the penholder and sucked it to get the grease off.

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