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Backpacking versus Thru-hiking @ Backpacking Light

Backpacking versus Thru-hiking @ Backpacking Light
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Backpacking Light 101 A Lightweight Primer to Backcountry Travel for the Uninitiated By Ryan Jordan Ryan Jordan is the co-founder and Publisher of Backpacking Light. He original wrote this article as a celebration of the evolution of lightweight backpacking as part of GoLite's 5th Anniversary catalog. Ultralight backpacking, contrary to proclamations by Those That Carry Heavy Packs, is not practiced by that crazy fringe segment of wilderness society that derives their calories from obscure edible roots and their shelter from two twigs and a waterproof handkerchief. Ultralight backpacking is not hard, nor does it discriminate against those with physical challenges. How-To: Seven Steps to Enlightenment 1. Don’t have a digital scale yet? 2. Camp chairs, GPS units, espresso makers, the latest Clancy novel, cellular phones – do you really need all this stuff? 3. 4. Ultralight backpacking requires that you rethink your equipment list. 5. 6. 7. The Ultralight Way of Life Ryan’s Ultralight Ethic Go Far Go High Go Fast

Hermann Hesse Quotes (Author of Siddhartha) “For me, trees have always been the most penetrating preachers. I revere them when they live in tribes and families, in forests and groves. And even more I revere them when they stand alone. They are like lonely persons. Not like hermits who have stolen away out of some weakness, but like great, solitary men, like Beethoven and Nietzsche. Trees are sanctuaries. A tree says: A kernel is hidden in me, a spark, a thought, I am life from eternal life. A tree says: My strength is trust. When we are stricken and cannot bear our lives any longer, then a tree has something to say to us: Be still! A longing to wander tears my heart when I hear trees rustling in the wind at evening. So the tree rustles in the evening, when we stand uneasy before our own childish thoughts: Trees have long thoughts, long-breathing and restful, just as they have longer lives than ours.

How To Use a Compass - when you have no compass.... Kjetil Kjernsmo's illustrated guide on Finding the directions without a compass You are lost. I mean really lost. Standing in the middle of nowhere, and you have no idea where to go. If you are really in trouble, remember two things first of all: stay calm, think rationally, and you can survive a long time without food. Further thoughts about extreme survival skills is beyond the scope of this page, seek advice elsewhere beyond this introduction. This page is mainly about the northern hemisphere of the earth, actually north of 23.5 °, because I have never been to the southern hemisphere myself (would like to go there of course!). For a start, it may be a good idea to climb a hill, and get a good look around. Let us start with the most accurate method. In the morning, at least before noon, the trick starts. Now, the line from the first stick to the second is west-east, like on the figure. There is a short, fast version of this one as well. Want to make your own compass?

Best Survival Movies From surviving natural disasters, nuclear wars, and shipwrecks to sci-fi alien invasions and zombie plagues, survival movies cover a wide range of genres. Here is our list of the Best Survival Movies ever made. Wilderness Survival Movies 127 Hours – Based on the true story of Aron Ralston whose journey into Utah’s Canyonlands National Park would become one of the most horrific tales of endurance and courage ever told.Alive – Based on the real-life events of an Uruguayan rugby team that crash landed in the Andes. Survival by Sea / Castaway Cast Away – One man’s story of survival after crash landing near a deserted island.Shackleton – The Greatest Survival Story of All Time – Based on the real-life adventure of Sir Ernest Shackleton’s whose 1914 Antarctic expedition turned out to be one of the greatest survival stories of all time.Lost – I know it’s a T.V. series, and not technically a movie, but I couldn’t leave it off the list. Zombie Apocalypse Movies Post-Apocalyptic Movies Misc.

BACKPACKING LIGHTWEIGHT - Backpacking & Hiking Resources A Bushcraft Camping Outfit - Equipment for Living in the Woods | Paul Kirtley's Blog The author's bushcraft camping outfit. See below for numbered version and listing. Photo: Paul Kirtley. Whether you are camping in the woods for a weekend or staying out for weeks, this bushcraft camping outfit is a good base model. It forms my standard bushcraft camping kit-list. One of the considerations for my kit is that it has to provide good durability for the cost. A Modular Approach As I’ve mentioned in other articles, I take a modular approach to my wilderness bushcraft equipment. Reduction One thing I’ve learnt over the years is that less is often more. Bushcraft Camping Equipment The author's bushcraft camping outfit. Shelter and Sleeping Kit 1. 2. 3. 4. Tarp set up for camping. Carrying Kit 5. 6. as my rucksack liner. Cooking and Water 7. Billy can kit - stuff sack, billy can, billy can insert, collapsible water bag (MSR Dromedary), and collapsible bowl (Sea to Summit Kitchen Sink). 8. 9. 10. 11. Personal Hygiene 12. 13. Clothing 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. Equipment 21. 22. 23. 24.

The Dalai Lama’s 18 Rules For Living May 6, 2011 | 42 Comments » | Topics: Life, List At the start of the new millennium the Dalai Lama apparently issued eighteen rules for living. Since word travels slowly in the digital age these have only just reached me. Here they are. Take into account that great love and great achievements involve great risk. When you lose, don’t lose the lesson. via OwenKelly Hot Stories From Around The Web Other Awesome Stories

The Top 100 Items to Disappear First by Mr. Smashy Survival Cache You could also call this “The Top 100 Things You should start stocking up on.” Even if you don’t need more than 2 (you should always have 2 of everything) each item on this list will be great for bartering. This list was discussed and chosen by the members of SurvivalistBoards.com. No Particular Order. I’ve linked to a couple of the items you are less likely to find at Wal-Mart and other local stores. Generators Water Filters/Purifiers Portable Toilets Seasoned Firewood Lamp Oil, Wicks, Lamps Coleman Fuel. What’s Missing? What do you think will disappear before these things that’s not on the list? Reprinted with permission from Survival Cache.

Vanishing Point: How to disappear in America without a trace Where there's water, life is possible. True, it may be very difficult and very hard to live, depending, but anyone who's driven, hiked, or camped in the American South West will have noticed that cities and ranches crop up where there's surface water or where there's been a well dug. Within the state of California, Nevada, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico, and Colorado, there are deserts, mesas, mountains, and forests where normally people never or rarely visit; not-so-secret places where there's water, access to a road within a day's hike, and where a fairly rugged individual may hide while remaining basically healthy, marginally well fed, and reasonably sane. In this section I'll look at two such environments, neither of which I would recommend, but one of which I'd suggest is a reasonable way to live in basic health while either on the run, hiding out from the law, old girl friends, the draft for an illegal war, putative wives and such. Where exactly? How I Would Do It Some Other Areas

DIY - Single Use Antibiotic Packs | Brian's Backpacking Blog The ongoing trend in the consumer market of providing small, ready-to-go, individual size packages of consumables has been a win-win for the lightweight and ultralight backpacking communities. Always looking to shave a few extra ounces or grams off of our overall pack weight, these individual servings are the perfect fit for trail snacks, drinks, condiments - you name it. However, these nicely packaged individual servings can come at a premium. They can often be pricy or difficult to find without going online and ordering in bulk +shipping. Which brings me to today's topic - individual size packages of antibiotic cream. I recently stumbled upon a really clever solution to this problem that involves a tube of antibiotic ointment (generic), a plastic drinking straw, a Bic lighter and a pair of needle-nose pliers (I use my Leatherman Squirt PS4 ). Use you fingers to squeeze the end of the straw so that it pushes the ointment further up inside the plastic straw.

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