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Wired 14.11: Very Short Stories

Wired 14.11: Very Short Stories
33 writers. 5 designers. 6-word science fiction. Page 1 of 1 We'll be brief: Hemingway once wrote a story in just six words ("For sale: baby shoes, never worn.") and is said to have called it his best work. So we asked sci-fi, fantasy, and horror writers from the realms of books, TV, movies, and games to take a shot themselves. Dozens of our favorite auteurs put their words to paper, and five master graphic designers took them to the drawing board. Sure, Arthur C. Failed SAT. Computer, did we bring batteries? Vacuum collision. Gown removed carelessly. Automobile warranty expires. Machine. Longed for him. His penis snapped off; he’s pregnant! From torched skyscrapers, men grew wings. - Gregory Maguire Internet “wakes up?” With bloody hands, I say good-bye. - Frank Miller Wasted day. “Cellar?” Epitaph: Foolish humans, never escaped Earth. - Vernor Vinge It cost too much, staying human. - Bruce Sterling We kissed. It’s behind you! I’m your future, child. 1940: Young Hitler! I’m dead. Easy.

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Kathy Reichs - Bones Wiki Kathleen Joan "Kathy" Reichs is a native of Chicago and works as a forensic anthropologist, an academic, and bestselling writer of mystery novels. She is a Professor of anthropology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, but is currently on indefinite leave.[1] She divides her time between work for the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner, State of North Carolina, and for the Laboratoire des Sciences Judiciaires et de Médecine Légale for the province of Québec. She is one of only fifty forensic anthropologists certified by the American Board of Forensic Anthropology[2] and is on the Board of Directors of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences. Her schedule also involves a number of speaking engagements around the world. Academic career Edit

Mark Twain (1835-1910) Luck by Mark Twain (1835-1910) Word Count: 1797 [Note—This is not a fancy sketch. I got it from a clergyman who was an instructor at Woolwich forty years ago, and who vouched for its truth. Hint Fiction Contest, Judged By Stewart O’Nan (2009) In the last two weeks of April 2009, I hosted a Hint Fiction Contest at my blog. Writers could submit two stories each. They could be either original or reprints. Thomas Jefferson (Selected Special Collections: Rare Book and Special Collections ReadingRoom, Libraryof Congress) Thomas Jefferson's Library The book collections of the Library of Congress were reestablished, after their destruction in 1814, by the purchase of the private library of Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826). At the time of the purchase, Jefferson's collection contained 6,487 volumes in the fields of politics, history, science, law literature, fine arts, and philosophy and was recognized as one of the finest private libraries in the United States. While several members of Congress object that the collection "was too philosophical, had too many books in foreign languages, was too costly, and was too large for the wants of Congress," as Librarian of Congress Ainsworth Rand Spofford wrote many years later, the purchase was authorized on January 26, 1815, for the sum of $23,950.

Famous Fiction Authors Writer (1854–1900) Author Oscar Wilde published several acclaimed works, including The Picture of Dorian Gray and The Importance of Being Earnest. Writer, Artist (1924–) Known for her fashion design and tumultuous personal life, actress, writer and artist Gloria Vanderbilt became an iconic figure in American popular…

The 4 Story Structures that Dominate Novels All stories contain four elements that can determine structure: milieu, idea, character and event. While each is present in every story, there is generally one that dominates the others. Which one dominates? The one that the author cares about most. This is why the process of discovering the structure of a story is usually a process of self-discovery. Works of Humanist Erasmus  Ongoing exhibition, opened April 11, 2008. Throughout his life, Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826) collected books across a vast spectrum of topics and languages. Jefferson followed a modified version of an organizational system created by British philosopher Francis Bacon (1561–1626) to arrange the books in his library, then the largest private book collection in North America. Divided into categories of Memory, Reason, and Imagination—which Jefferson translated to “History,” “Philosophy,” and “Fine Arts”—and further divided into forty-four “chapters,” the collection placed within Jefferson’s fingertips the span of his multifaceted interests. The books from Jefferson’s library are part of the Rare Book and Special Collections Division of the Library of Congress. Southwest Pavilion, 2nd Floor, Thomas Jefferson Building

Basic page The Return By Ngugi Wa Thiong’o The road was long. Whenever he took a step forward, little clouds of dust rose, whirled angrily behind him, and then slowly settled again. But a thin train of dust was left in the air, moving like smoke. How to Structure A Story: The Eight-Point Arc By Ali Hale One of my favourite “how to write” books is Nigel Watts’ Writing A Novel and Getting Published. My battered, torn and heavily-pencil-marked copy is a testament to how useful I’ve found it over the years. Although the cover appears to be on the verge of falling off altogether, I’ve risked opening the book once more to bring you Watts’ very useful “Eight-Point Story Arc” – a fool-proof, fail-safe and time-honoured way to structure a story. (Even if you’re a short story writer or flash fiction writer rather than a novelist, this structure still applies, so don’t be put off by the title of Watts’ book.)

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