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The Logical Fallacies: Welcome

The Logical Fallacies: Welcome
Welcome Welcome to an official mirror site of The point of an argument is to give reasons in support of some conclusion. An argument commits a fallacy when the reasons offered do not support the conclusion. See How To Use This Guide. If you can think of more fallacies that you'd really like to see, please send me a note. In the long run, this site will become a complete discussion of logic.

http://onegoodmove.org/fallacy/welcome.htm

Commentary on Wittgenstein's Philosophical Investigations Shawver Commentary: This commentary in the pages of this website is not meant to replace your reading of Wittgenstein in the original. For that, of course, you will need to acquire the book. This commentary is meant to give you a taste of Wittgentein, or, if you are really ready, to help you get started. The problem is that while Wittgenstein's writing style is quite beautiful, almost poetic, it is so unusual, that all of us, it seems, need a little help in the beginning. It is my hope that after you read this commentary, however, that his meanings will appear transparent to you when you hold your copy of this wonderful book in your hands.

JFK: Secrecy is Repugnant Some 250,000 classified cables and embassy dispatches from the State Department are being released today via WikiLeaks latest, and reportedly largest, document dump ever. Within the last hour, news reports based on those documents have begun to be published by various world media outlets that are said to have been given advanced access. [Update: Browse all of the documents now via WikiLeaks' "CableGate" database.] Among the very first revelations to emerge, as quickly highlighted on Twitter via search hashtags #WikiLeaks and #CableGate this morning, are details on the U.S. having pleaded with Germany in 2007 to not prosecute CIA operatives who kidnapped and tortured a terror suspect, Yemeni officials covering up U.S. drone strikes in their country, Saudi officials encouraging U.S. to take attack Iran, the U.S. spying on UN diplomats, as well as various, potentially embarrassing State Department assessments of allied world leaders. There will be much more to come. As well, John F.

AttentionTrust.org Last Friday, I led a workshop to build a web site for a new foundation that Steve Gillmor and Hank Barry and I have been thinking through called AttentionTrust. Steve is an inveterate blogger and podcaster who has been on a crusade to inform the blogosphere about the value of attention data. Hank Barry took a sabbatical from his role as VC at Hummer Winblad and stepped in to run Napster a few years back and take on the RIAA, an opponent whose paperwork he is still digging himself out from under. I came to Attention because it simply felt right, like an equal rights argument at a time when all such arguments seem to have been resolved many years ago.

Drug War Clock Researchers examining the effectiveness of ONDCP's anti-drug media campaign reported: "The NSPY [National Survey of Parents and Youth] did not find significant reductions in marijuana use either leading up to or after the Marijuana campaign for youth 12 to 18 years old between 2002 and 2003. Indeed there was evidence for an increase in past month and past year use among the target audience of 14- to 16-year-olds, although it appears that the increase was already in place in the last half of 2002, before the launch of the Marijuana Initiative. It will be worthwhile to track whether the nonsignificant decline from the second half of 2002 through the first half of 2003 is the beginning of a true trend.

Lexical Analysis of 2008 US Presidential and Vice-Presidiential Debates - Who's the Windbag? Lexical Analysis of 2008 US Presidential and Vice-Presidential Debateshome | Martin Krzywinski : projects contact 1 minute summary Metrics of speech structure of candidates fall within narrow tolerances, suggesting high degree of wordsmithing and rehearsal. For example, noun/verb/adjective/adverb ratio spread is very small with candidates' values within 2%. Relatively small differences seen in unique word count and noun phrase profile. The Obama/McCain debates began with balanced performance from both candidates but end with Obama verbally overpowering McCain and delivering speech with more concepts and higher complexity.

Navigating Neoliberalism: Political Aesthetics in an Age of Crisis (Nick Srnicek) Navigating Neoliberalism3 the ensemble of society’s structures as a whole.” In charting through a loose set of historical periods from national to imperialist to globalised capitalism, Jameson arguesthat at one time the nature of capitalism was such that one could potentially establish acorrespondence between our local phenomenological experiences and the economicstructure that determined it. Peter D. Klein Peter David Klein (born 17 September 1940) is a professor of philosophy and chair of the department at Rutgers University, New Jersey. Peter Klein received a BA at Earlham College, and a PhD from Yale University. He is the author of Certainty: A Refutation of Skepticism (1982) and a variety of articles and reviews addressing issues in epistemology. Klein is widely known for his work on skepticism.

Cost of War to the United States About | Embed | Notes & Sources To embed the Cost of Military Action Against ISIS counter on your website, blog, etc, follow these simple instructions: 1) Add the following javascript to your page: Add the following code wherever you want the counter to show up: NOTE: This doesn't need to be a <div>. The Illusion of Free Markets - Bernard E. Harcourt It is widely believed today that the free market is the best mechanism ever invented to efficiently allocate resources in society. Just as fundamental as faith in the free market is the belief that government has a legitimate and competent role in policing and the punishment arena. This curious incendiary combination of free market efficiency and the Big Brother state has become seemingly obvious, but it hinges on the illusion of a supposedly natural order in the economic realm. The Illusion of Free Markets argues that our faith in “free markets” has severely distorted American politics and punishment practices. Bernard Harcourt traces the birth of the idea of natural order to eighteenth-century economic thought and reveals its gradual evolution through the Chicago School of economics and ultimately into today’s myth of the free market. This modern vision rests on a simple but devastating illusion.

An Essay by Einstein "How strange is the lot of us mortals! Each of us is here for a brief sojourn; for what purpose he knows not, though he sometimes thinks he senses it. But without deeper reflection one knows from daily life that one exists for other people -- first of all for those upon whose smiles and well-being our own happiness is wholly dependent, and then for the many, unknown to us, to whose destinies we are bound by the ties of sympathy. A hundred times every day I remind myself that my inner and outer life are based on the labors of other men, living and dead, and that I must exert myself in order to give in the same measure as I have received and am still receiving... "I have never looked upon ease and happiness as ends in themselves -- this critical basis I call the ideal of a pigsty.

Table of Contents abduction (Igor Douven) Abelard [Abailard], Peter (Peter King) Abhidharma (Noa Ronkin) abilities (John Maier) Abner of Burgos (Shalom Sadik) Abrabanel, Judah (Aaron Hughes) abstract objects (Gideon Rosen) accidental properties — see essential vs. accidental properties action (George Wilson and Samuel Shpall) action-based theories of perception (Robert Briscoe and Rick Grush) action at a distance — see quantum mechanics: action at a distance in actualism (Christopher Menzel) adaptationism (Steven Hecht Orzack and Patrick Forber) Addams, Jane (Maurice Hamington) Adorno, Theodor W. (Lambert Zuidervaart) advance directives (Agnieszka Jaworska) Aegidius Romanus — see Giles of Rome Aenesidemus — see skepticism: ancient aesthetic, concept of the (James Shelley) aesthetics aesthetics of the everyday (Yuriko Saito) affirmative action (Robert Fullinwider) Africana Philosophy (Lucius T. Outlaw Jr.) B [jump to top]

The Death of Postmodernism And Beyond Articles Alan Kirby says postmodernism is dead and buried. In its place comes a new paradigm of authority and knowledge formed under the pressure of new technologies and contemporary social forces. I have in front of me a module description downloaded from a British university English department’s website. It includes details of assignments and a week-by-week reading list for the optional module ‘Postmodern Fictions’, and if the university is to remain nameless here it’s not because the module is in any way shameful but that it handily represents modules or module parts which will be taught in virtually every English department in the land this coming academic year. It assumes that postmodernism is alive, thriving and kicking: it says it will introduce “the general topics of ‘postmodernism’ and ‘postmodernity’ by examining their relationship to the contemporary writing of fiction”.

Thus Spake Zarathustra/Part One [edit] Three metamorphoses of the spirit do I designate to you: now the spirit becometh a camel, the camel a lion, and the lion at last a child. Many heavy things are there for the spirit, the strong load-bearing spirit in which the reverence dwelleth: for the heavy and the heaviest longeth its strength.

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