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Fixing A Broken User Experience

Fixing A Broken User Experience
Advertisement Unless you’re developing completely new products at a startup, you likely work in an organization that has accumulated years of legacy design and development in its products. Even if the product you’re working on is brand spanking new, your organization will eventually need to figure out how to unify the whole product experience, either by bringing the old products up to par with the new or by bringing your new efforts in line with existing ones. A fragmented product portfolio sometimes leads to an overall broken user experience. Understanding an organization and its users and designing the right interaction and visual system take exceptional effort. You also need to communicate that system to teams that have already produced work that doesn’t align with it. The Hierarchy Of Effort Many large successful companies end up in a situation where they must maintain dozens, if not hundreds, of applications in their product portfolios. Visual Consistency and Simplification UX Culture

http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2012/09/27/fixing-broken-user-experience/

Related:  User Experience

The Difference Between Information Architecture and UX Design - UX Booth Information architects form the blueprints of the web Next to explaining what I do for a living, the second question I most frequently hear is: “What’s the difference between Information Architecture and User Experience?” The line always seems to blur between the two, even though there’s clearly a difference. How should I go about explaining it? Information Architecture, according to Wikipedia, is “the art and science of organizing and labelling websites … to support usability.“ According to the same source, User Experience is “the way a person feels about using a product, system or service. [This includes] a person’s perceptions of the practical aspects such as utility, ease of use and efficiency of the system.”

Business Model Canvas for User Experience by Alexander Osterwalder’s Business Model Canvas is the tool of choice for a quick, one page dashboard of your business hypotheses. It very much appeals to the business guy in me, but it irks the User Experience (UX) part of my brain. But hey…the canvas is a tool. Use the right tool for the right job. Don’t have the right tool? 5 Proven UX Strategies Get the FlatPix UI Kit for only $7 - Learn More or Buy Now Whether dealing with large corporations, game developers, small businesses or a sole proprietor, most business goals tend to amount to the same needs. User experience is an area that touches almost every single business problem. While every project comes with its own unique situations, there are a few tried-and-true user experience techniques that just work well and always produce results. Here are my top five proven UX strategies and techniques:

Beyond Wireframing: The Real-Life UX Design Process We all know basic tenets of user-centered design. We recognize different research methods, the prototyping stage, as well as the process of documenting techniques in our rich methodological environment. The question you probably often ask yourself, though, is how it all works in practice? What do real-life UX design processes actually look like? Do we have time for every step in the process that we claim to be ideal? In this article, I’ll share a couple of insights about the real-life UX design process and speak from my own experience and research.

Reframing “UX Design” I was asked to speak at UX Week 2012, and figured I’d turn my blog post “User experience is strategy, not design” into a talk, but a funny thing happened along the way. I realized that, yes, UX is design, but not design as we’ve been thinking of it. And by reframing “UX design” as a profession, we can set it up to uniquely address increasingly prevalent business needs. Before tackling the profession, we need to agree on just what “UX design” is. I have not come across a better definition than Jesse’s, which he originally shared in 2009: Experience design is the design of anything, independent of medium, or across media, with human experience as an explicit outcome, and human engagement as an explicit goal.

Design - Color Use color primarily for emphasis. Choose colors that fit with your brand and provide good contrast between visual components. Note that red and green may be indistinguishable to color-blind users. Blue is the standard accent color in Android's color palette. Lean Strategy for UX Design Last Fall, we were working on a product for a client whose industry was undergoing substantial disruption. The project involved a robust upfront discovery piece running the full gamut of customer insights, competitive analysis, and even business model exploration. We undertook lots of primary and secondary research, thoroughly analyzed the data, and generated a nicely synthesized plan.

Lean Startup Is Great UX Packaging Advertisement When Albert Einstein was a professor1 at Princeton University in the 1940s, there came the time for the final exam of his physics class. His assistants passed the exam forms to the hundreds of students, and the hall was dead silent. One of the assistants suddenly noticed something was wrong. She approached Einstein and told him that a mistake had been made with the exam form and that the questions were the same as those in the previous year’s exam.

Bootstrap, from Twitter Need reasons to love Bootstrap? Look no further. By nerds, for nerds. Qui sont les leaders britanniques de 2012 et de l'expérience client Que pouvons-nous apprendre d'eux? «LE BLOG DU CLIENT Why have I been making such a big fuss of leadership, management and employee engagement? Some of you – especially those of you that focus on strategy, process or technology – might have noticed that I have increasingly made a big thing of leadership, management, employee engagement and organisational effectiveness. Why? This is the third year of the Nunwood Customer Experience Excellence Index in the UK and here is what the 2012 report says: “For many of the Top 10 it is their focus on employee engagement, training, development and motivation even for seemingly mundane jobs that differentiates the service experience.”

Lean UX: Getting Out Of The Deliverables Business Advertisement User experience design for the Web (and its siblings, interaction design, UI design, et al) has traditionally been a deliverables-based practice. Wireframes, site maps, flow diagrams, content inventories, taxonomies, mockups and the ever-sacred specifications document (aka “The Spec”) helped define the practice in its infancy. These deliverables crystallized the value that the UX discipline brought to an organization. Over time, though, this deliverables-heavy process has put UX designers in the deliverables business — measured and compensated for the depth and breadth of their deliverables instead of the quality and success of the experiences they design. Designers have become documentation subject matter experts, known for the quality of the documents they create instead of the end-state experiences being designed and developed.

Related:  UX and Usability