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Royal Society journal archive made permanently free to access

Royal Society journal archive made permanently free to access
26 October 2011 Around 60,000 historical scientific papers are accessible via a fully searchable online archive, with papers published more than 70 years ago now becoming freely available. The Royal Society is the world’s oldest scientific publisher, with the first edition of Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society appearing in 1665. Henry Oldenburg – Secretary of the Royal Society and first Editor of the publication – ensured that it was “licensed by the council of the society, being first reviewed by some of the members of the same”, thus making it the first ever peer-reviewed journal. Philosophical Transactions had to overcome early setbacks including plague, the Great Fire of London and even the imprisonment of Oldenburg, but against the odds the publication survived to the present day. Its foundation would eventually be recognised as one of the most pivotal moments of the scientific revolution. Search the journal archive here.

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Cool Infographics - Cool Posters A collection of great infographic posters from around the world. Click the image to be taken to the poster site to view details and order yourself a copy. Purchasing posters through these links will help support Cool Infographics on most of the posters below. Thank you! A Visual Compendium of Cameras A meticulously illustrated catalog of 100 landmark cameras, culled from over a century of photographic history, depicting both professional and consumer models and tracing photography’s history from the first models to today’s digital wonders. peer_review_in_public_james_hansen_s_climate_predictions_released_as_a_draft Photo by Lucas Jackson/Reuters The latest predictions from the usually dire climate scientist James Hansen made a lot of people sit up and take notice. The Washington Post ran a story about the study with the headline, “The world’s most famous climate scientist just outlined an alarming scenario for our planet’s future,” and Slate called it a “bombshell sea level warning.” Most coverage paid attention to, among other things, Hansen’s prediction that climate change is “triggering major sea level rise in a time frame of 50 to 200 years.”

Zinio selection du jour Catégories Offres gratuit Découvrez des articles gratuits Open Source Apps: the Monster List It's become something of an annual tradition at Datamation to end the year with a gigantic compilation of all the open source software we've surveyed over the past twelve months or so. (See 2010's Open Source Apps: the Ultimate List and 2009's Open Source Software: The Monster List.) This year's retrospective is bigger than ever with 957 excellent open source applications featured. The complete list is a lot to handle in one sitting, so we've divided it into categories.

Academic Journals: The Most Profitable Obsolete Technology in History  The music business was killed by Napster; movie theaters were derailed by digital streaming; traditional magazines are in crisis mode--yet in this digital information wild west: academic journals and the publishers who own them are posting higher profits than nearly any sector of commerce. Academic publisher Elsevier, which owns a majority of the prestigious academic journals, has higher operating profits than Apple. In 2013, Elsevier posted 39 percent profits, according to Heather Morrison, assistant professor at the University of Ottawa's School of Information Studies in contrast to the 37 percent profit that Apple displayed.

Simone Aliprandi - Creative Commons: a user guide Here is an operational manual which guides creators step by step in the world of Creative Commons licenses, the most famous and popular licenses for free distribution of intellectual products. Without neglecting useful conceptual clarifications, the author goes into technical details of the tools offered by Creative Commons, thus making them also understandable for total neophytes. This is a fundamental book for all those who are interested in the opencontent and copyleft world. The author: Simone Aliprandi is an Italian lawyer and researcher who is constantly engaged in writing and consulting in the field of copyright and ICT law. He founded and still coordinates the project and has published numerous books devoted to openculture and copyleft. This is his first publishing in English.

How many pupils from your school go to Oxbridge? Four schools and one sixth-form college sent more pupils to Oxford and Cambridge between them over three years than 2,000 schools and colleges across the UK, according to a new study that analyses university admissions by individual schools. Westminster, Eton, St Pauls, St Pauls Girls School and Hills Road sixth form college, a state school, produced 946 Oxbridge entrants from 2007-09. In the same period, 2,000 schools and colleges sent 927 pupils to Oxbridge. The difference in these schools' success rates is driven mainly by gaps in achievement at A-level, but some schools do better at gaining entry to university than others with similar exam results. At a comprehensive and a private school in Cornwall, with near identical results, one sent 17% to selective universities and the other 66%. There are striking differences even between schools of the same type.

Academic publishers make Murdoch look like a socialist Who are the most ruthless capitalists in the western world? Whose monopolistic practices make Walmart look like a corner shop and Rupert Murdoch a socialist? You won't guess the answer in a month of Sundays. While there are plenty of candidates, my vote goes not to the banks, the oil companies or the health insurers, but – wait for it – to academic publishers. Theirs might sound like a fusty and insignificant sector. It is anything but. DNA robot could kill cancer cells DNA origami, a technique for making structures from DNA, may be more than just a cool design concept. It can also be used to build devices that can seek out and destroy living cells. The nanorobots, as the researchers call them, use a similar system to cells in the immune system to engage with receptors on the outside of cells.

Free Geolocation Database New Database Format Available: This page is for our legacy databases. For our latest database format, please see our GeoLite2 Databases. Databases IP Geolocation The GeoLite databases are our free IP geolocation databases. Transcript for Ann Blair on Information Overload Jim Fleming: Information overload may seem like a quintessentially 21st century problem, but more than 2000 years ago people complained about the very same thing. The rise of the printed word and the creation of the printing press also flooded the world with vast new streams of information. And it took people a while to figure out how to store and manage all the new knowledge. Historian Ann Blair charts this history in her book, "Too Much To Know". Anne Strainchamps spoke with her.

Hackathon alert: BiblioHack! The Open Knowledge Foundation’s Open Biblio group, and Working Group on Open Data in Cultural Heritage, along with DevCSI, present BiblioHack: an open Hackathon to kick-start the summer months. From Wednesday 13th – Thursday 14th June, we’ll be meeting at Queen Mary, University of London, East London, and any budding hackers are welcome, along with anyone interested in opening up metadata and the open cause – this free event aims to bring together software developers, project managers, librarians and experts in the area of Open Bibliographic Data. A workshop will run alongside the coding on the 13th, and a meet-up on the evening of the 12th is open to all whether you’re attending the Hackathon or not. What is BiblioHack? BiblioHack will be two days of hacking and sharing ideas about open bibliographic metadata.

Around 60,000 historical scientific papers are accessible via a fully searchable online archive, with papers published more than 70 years ago now becoming freely available. The move is being made as part of the Royal Society’s ongoing commitment to open access in scientific publishing. Opening of the archive is being timed to coincide with Open Access Week, and also comes soon after the Royal Society announced its first ever fully open access journal, Open Biology. by macopa Sep 2

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