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Celtic deities

Celtic deities
The gods and goddesses of the pre-Christian Celtic peoples are known from a variety of sources, including written Celtic mythology, ancient places of worship, statues, engravings, cult objects and place or personal names. In characteristic Roman fashion, Caesar does not refer to these figures by their native names but by the names of the Roman gods with which he equated them, a procedure that greatly complicates the task of identifying his Gaulish deities with their counterparts in the insular literatures. He also presents a neat schematic equation of god and function that is quite foreign to the vernacular literary testimony. Yet, given its limitations, his brief catalog is a valuable witness. General characteristics[edit] Supra-regional cults[edit] Among the divinities transcending tribal boundaries were the Matres, Cernunnos, the sky-god and Epona, the horse-goddess, who was invoked by devotees living as far apart as Britain, Rome and Bulgaria. Local cults[edit] Divine couples[edit]

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Related:  Les CeltesCelticIrish & Celtic Myths / Deities / Stories & fables

Pwyll Pwyll Pen Annwn is a prominent figure in Welsh mythology and literature, the lord of Dyfed, husband of Rhiannon and father of the hero Pryderi. He is the eponymous hero of Pwyll Pendefig Dyfed, the first branch of the Four Branches of the Mabinogi, and also appears briefly as a member of Arthur's court in the medieval tale Culhwch ac Olwen. Origin of Pwyll, Prince of Dyfed[edit] Tale is one of a group found in The Mabinogion Mabinogion. The Mabinogion is one of the earliest known efforts to form a contemporary collection of Welsh tales. Such tales, which date back to circa 1325 C.E., were originally passed from person to person and generation to generation orally.

Boudicca, the Celtic Queen that unleashed fury on the Romans We British are used to women commanders in war; I am descended from mighty men! But I am not fighting for my kingdom and wealth now. I am fighting as an ordinary person for my lost freedom, my bruised body, and my outraged daughters.... Inuit Myth and Legend Inuit mythology is a repository of Inuit culture, passed down by elders through generations to enrich and enlighten. My Mother's Story By Solomon Karpik, 1987 (courtesy DINA/PAN 83PR87 29). Inuit mythology is a repository of Inuit culture, passed down by elders through generations to enrich and enlighten. Celtic Otherworld In Celtic mythology, the Otherworld is the realm of the living and the home of the deities and other powerful spirits. Tales and folklore refer to the Otherworld as "The Fortunate Isles" in the western sea, or at other times underground (such as in the Sídhe) or right alongside the world of the living, but invisible to most humans. The intrusion of the Otherworld into this one is signaled by the appearance of divine beings or unusual animals, or other phenomena such as sudden changes in the weather.[1] Sometimes an otherworldly woman will present an apple or an apple branch, or a ball of thread to follow as it unwinds.[1][2]

The Irish Story and Legend of Cu Chulainn Cu Chulainn is one of the most famous Irish mythological heroes. He appears in the stories of the Ulster Cycle, and Scottish and Manx folklore. He was said to be the son of Deichtine and the god Lugh, and the nephew of Conchobar mac Nessa, the King of Ulster. His given name at birth was Setanta but he gained the name Cu Chulainn, meaning ‘Culann’s Hound’ after he killed a ferocious guard dog belonging to a smith named Culann. Cu Chulainn offered to take the place of the guard dog until a replacement could be reared.

The Druid and Phoenician Coarbs of Ireland "These Corybantes are the Irish Curbs or Coarbs. It is not surprising that they came from Phoenicia." - Sir Godfrey Higgins The ancient Druids in Ireland and Culdee priests of Iona had called their priests by the name of the Coarbs. The Celtic Goddess Epona that Rode Swiftly Across the Ancient Roman Empire The protector of horses, mules, and cavalry, Epona was one of the only non-Roman goddesses to have been wholly adopted by the Roman Empire. Often depicted astride a horse, Epona resonated in the forces of the Roman cavalry as an inspiration and guide through even the darkest of battles, and she remained one of their most worshipped goddesses between the first and third centuries CE. Interestingly, Epona was also seen as a goddess of fertility, accompanied in many of her depictions by grain or a cornucopia. Coupled with the worship of her equine prowess in the military, it is evident she was seen both in Gaulish and Roman cultures as a deity of prosperity within the equestrian home and on the battlefield.

Irish mythology Bunworth Banshee The mythology of pre-Christian Ireland did not entirely survive the conversion to Christianity. However, much of it was preserved in medieval Irish literature, though it was shorn of its religious meanings. This literature represents the most extensive and best preserved of all the branches of Celtic mythology. The Irish Tuatha Dé Dannan Connection to the Tribe of Dan "It is certainly no coincidence that the Irish Gaelic word Dun or Dunn means "Judge," just as Dan does in Hebrew!" - Raymond McNair The ancient connections between the Irish Tuatha Dé Dannan and the Greek Tribe of Dan have been documented all throughout history.

Celtic mythology Overview[edit] Though the Celtic world at its apex covered much of western and central Europe, it was not politically unified nor was there any substantial central source of cultural influence or homogeneity; as a result, there was a great deal of variation in local practices of Celtic religion (although certain motifs, for example the god Lugh, appear to have diffused throughout the Celtic world). Inscriptions of more than three hundred deities, often equated with their Roman counterparts, have survived, but of these most appear to have been genii locorum, local or tribal gods, and few were widely worshipped.

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