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Turn To-Dos into Habits to Make Hard Work Effortless and Easy

Turn To-Dos into Habits to Make Hard Work Effortless and Easy
Related:  How To Start New HabitsProductivityHabits

The Golden Rule of Habit Change In the last decade, our understanding of the neurology of habit formation has been transformed. A quiet revolution has upended our concept of the way patterns work within our lives, societies, and organizations. And much of what we have learned has come from studying the simplest of habits — such as why people bite their nails. In the summer of 2006, for instance, a 24-year-old graduate student named Mandy walked into the counseling center at Mississippi State University. For most of her life, Mandy had bitten her nails, gnawing them until they bled. Lots of people bite their nails. Mandy would often bite until her nails pulled away from the skin underneath. The biting habit had damaged her social life. The counseling center referred Mandy to a doctoral psychology student who was studying a treatment known as “habit reversal training.” The Habit Loop The psychologist knew that changing Mandy’s nail biting habit required inserting a new routine into her life. A Competing Response

How To Create A Habit In 15 Days Most of our life is lived by habits. We learn how to ride a bike, how to drive a car, we even learn how to speak and read. And then we do all of these with minimum effort and implication. As any other things in our life, habits are just tools we use in our joyful exploration of life. In today’s post I’ll share some of my experiences with habit creation using one of my favorite activities: journaling. Why Do You Need A New Habit? Well, let’s say you want a new habit in order to: write on your blog more oftenupdate your twitter status dailywrite each day a page from your new bookstart a fitness programstart a new eating habit or dietlearn a new language All these new activities are made by some repetitive tasks, a set of moves you have to do daily in order to get some positive results. How To Create A Habit In 15 Days All you need for that is a journal. Day 1: Name your habit Define it in the shortest, yet most understandable sentence you can write. Day 2: Describe your actions in detail

18 Tricks to Make New Habits Stick Wouldn’t it be nice to have everything run on autopilot? Chores, exercise, eating healthy and getting your work done just happening automatically. Unless they manage to invent robot servants, all your work isn’t going to disappear overnight. But if you program behaviors as new habits you can take out the struggle. With a small amount of initial discipline, you can create a new habit that requires little effort to maintain. 1. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. The Only Way to Get Important Things Done - Tony Schwartz by Tony Schwartz | 8:00 AM May 24, 2011 “How can I get 7-8 hours of sleep when I’m with my kids from the moment I arrive home, and I need some time for myself before bed?” “How can I find time to exercise when I have to get up early in the morning and I’m exhausted by the time I get home in the evening?” “How can I possibly keep up when I get 200 emails a day?” “When is there time to think reflectively and strategically?” These are the sorts of plaintive questions I’m asked over and over again when I give talks these days, whether they’re at companies, conferences, schools, hospitals or government agencies. Most everyone I meet feels pulled in more directions than ever, expected to work longer hours, and asked to get more done, often with fewer resources. What have they figured out that the rest of their colleagues have not? The answer, surprisingly, is not that they have more will or discipline than you do. Indeed many great performers aren’t even consciously aware that’s what they’ve done.

5 Common Mistakes That Cause New Habits to Fail (and What to Do About Them) Welcome to 2015. It’s New Year’s Resolution time. Depending on where you get your numbers, somewhere between 81 percent and 92 percent of New Years Resolutions fail. [1] Translation: At least 8 times out of 10, you are more likely to fall back into your old habits and patterns than you are to stick with a new behavior. Behavior change is hard. Why is that? I don’t claim to have all the answers, but after two years of researching and writing about the science of behavior change, let me share the most practical insights I’ve learned so far. PROBLEM 1: Trying to Change Everything at Once SOLUTION: Pick one thing and do it well. The general consensus among behavior change researchers is that you should focus on changing a very small number of habits at the same time. The highest number you’ll find is changing three habits at once and that suggestion comes from BJ Fogg at Stanford University. How tiny? Personally, I prefer to focus on building one new behavior into my life at a time.

What It Takes to Form a Good Habit I think "accountability buddy" really misses the point. There is satisfaction and joy in accomplishing the task, but that's where accountability buddy is a misnomer. All habits of any sort will trip, falter, fail, etc. We are humans and we love to connect and share experiences with - even introverts have a means by which they connect and share. By far, the most important aspect of developing any habit is the actual doing of the habit. [From years of experience as fitness center owner/operator] The Power of Habit and How to Rewire Our "Habit Loops" by Maria Popova What Iraqi kebob vendors have to do with your New Year’s resolutions. As a young man, Benjamin Franklin set out to improve himself by devising a chart-based log for tracking his progress against the virtues he identified as essential to good personhood. Each week, he would pick a virtue to cultivate, then put a black pencil mark in his calendar chart on any day he failed to uphold the virtue. This visual feedback on his progress encouraged him, and allowed him to move to a different virtue the following week, hoping that each week would leave him with a “habitude” for that particular virtue. We try to reverse-engineer willpower and flowchart our way to happiness, but in the end, it is habit that is at the heart of our successes and our failures. Duhigg first became fascinated by the power of habit eight years ago, while in Baghdad as a newspaper reporter. So the major summoned Kufa’s mayor and made a strange request: Get the food vendors out of the plaza. Donating = Loving

‘Health Chatter’: The Health Behaviour Research Centre Blog » Blog Archive » Busting the 21 days habit formation myth Have you ever made a New Year’s resolution? If so, you may have been assured – usually by a well-meaning supporter of your attempted transformation – that you only have to stick with your resolution for 21 days for it to become an ingrained habit. The magic number 21 creeps up in many articles about forming a new habit or making a change, but little is known about the origins of the ’21 days’ claim. Psychologists from our department have devoted extensive time and effort to find out what it takes to form ‘habits’ (which psychologists define as learned actions that are triggered automatically when we encounter the situation in which we’ve repeatedly done those actions). We know that habits are formed through a process called ‘context-dependent repetition’. Habits are mentally efficient: the automation of frequent behaviours allows us to conserve the mental resources that we would otherwise use to monitor and control these behaviours, and deploy them on more difficult or novel tasks.

5 Steps to Create a New Habit ‘Your net worth to the world is usually determined by what remains after your bad habits are subtracted from your good ones.’ ~Benjamin Franklin Editor’s note: This is a guest post from Tess Marshall of The Bold Life. When I decided to quit smoking, I was 27 years old, my two oldest daughters were seven and five, and the twins were three. I didn’t want to be a bad example, I hid my smoking from them. As my addiction grew stronger, I began smoking in the bathroom with the window open. I freaked out, flushed my cigarette down the toilet, gathered my composure, and nonchalantly walked out. He calmly told me, “Tess, the way I see it, you have two choices: you can either quit or come out of the closet.” I chose to quit. I began running laps on an indoor track, at a nearby college. When I could run a mile without stopping or walking, I decided I would add one mile per month to my training. With my new habit, I changed our entire family. The Keys to Habits 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

30 Habits that Will Change your Life Developing good habits is the basic of personal development and growth. Everything we do is the result of a habit that was previously taught to us. Unfortunately, not all the habits that we have are good, that’s why we are constantly trying to improve. The following is a list of 30 practical habits that can make a huge difference in your life. You should treat this list as a reference, and implement just one habit per month. Health habits Exercise 30 minutes every day. Productivity habits Use an inbox system. Personal Development habits Read 1 book per week. Career habits Start a blog. What do you think? Update: A reader put together a downloadable copy of all these habits.

How to Build Self-Discipline Discipline is freedom. You may disagree with this statement, and if you do you are certainly not alone. For many people discipline is a dirty word that is equated with the absence of freedom. In fact the opposite is true. As Stephen R. Self-discipline involves acting according to what you think instead of how you feel in the moment. Work on an idea or project after the initial rush of enthusiasm has faded awayGo to the gym when all you want to do is lie on the couch and watch TVWake early to work on yourselfSay “no” when tempted to break your dietOnly check your email a few of times per day at particular times In the past self-discipline has been a weakness of mine, and as a result today I find myself lacking the ability to do a number of things which I would like – e.g. to play the guitar. If you struggle with self-discipline, the good news is that it can be developed. 1. Discipline means behaving according to what you have decided is best, regardless of how you feel in the moment. 2.

Exploring the art and science of conscious living. - Blog - 30 Days Will Not Change Your Life I think I can be unnecessarily hard on myself sometimes (I did just draft an article tentatively titled "I Do Dumb Things"). I get disappointed with myself when I don't follow through with habit changes as completely as I imagined I would. I've started and failed a myriad of activities, hobbies, and new habits. Just a couple of highlights from my own personal Wall of Shame include; meditating every day for over two months, going to a meditation retreat, and then not meditating for 5 months after that; still biting my nails; wasting huge swaths of time doing stupid things on my computer; eating like an idiot more than I should (donutsssssssssssss) and I'm sure many others that I'm conveniently forgetting. When training for a marathon you don't strap on your shoes and go out for a 15 mile run as your first training session. The nice thing about training for a marathon is that it's easy to break it up into smaller chunks. And so on.

Use Scheduling to Change Your Habits The Strategy of Scheduling, of setting a specific, regular time for an activity to recur, is one of the most familiar and powerful strategies of habit formation. Scheduling makes us far more likely to convert an activity into a habit. Habits grow strongest and fastest when they're repeated in predictable ways, and for most of us putting an activity on the schedule tends to lock us into doing it. To apply the Strategy of Scheduling, we must decide when, and how often, a habit should occur. However, I’ve noticed that I have both fixed habits and unfixed habits. I’d given up the idea that I can create a habit simply by scheduling an action a certain number of times. We may not be able to form a habit in twenty-one days, but in many situations, we do benefit from scheduling a habit every day. One of my most helpful Secrets of Adulthood is "What I do every day matters more than what I do once in a while." Along with meditation, I identified two new habits to follow every day.

13 Things to Avoid When Changing Habits | Zen Habits “Habit is habit, and not to be flung out of the window by any man, but coaxed downstairs a step at a time.” - Mark Twain Post written by Leo Babauta. Follow me on Twitter. I’ve learned a lot about changing habits in the last 2 1/2 years, from quitting smoking to taking up running and GTD and vegetarianism and waking early and all that. I’ve not only learned a lot about what you should do when changing habits, but through my failures, I’ve learned about what not to do. And trust me, I’ve had lots of failures. I’ve found failures to be just as important as successes when trying to learn how to improve, especially when it comes to changing habits. I’ve done that, with one failure after another, and would like to share a few things I’ve learned to avoid when trying to change a habit. “Motivation is what gets you started. Taking on two or more habits at once. “We are what we repeatedly do. —If you liked this article, please share it on del.icio.us, StumbleUpon or Digg.

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