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Move Commons

Move Commons

http://movecommons.org/

Related:  New Economy

Post Capitalism (plus 5 layers of Corporate Transformation) The post is also available in Italian here. The Zero Marginal Cost Society In the last few days a number of, more or less enjoyable, articles introducing the latest book by Jeremy Rifkin, released earlier in March, saw the light on all the most important online newspapers worldwide. Knowledge Is a Common Good - Transform Network The Effects of the Open Source Movement on the Development of Politics and Society Introduction In October 2009, Transform! co-promoted the first Free Culture Forum (FCF). Soak the Rich This exchange is from a conversation in Paris between David Graeber and Thomas Piketty, discoursing on the deep shit we’re all in and what we might do about climbing out. It was held at the École Normale Supérieure; moderated by Joseph Confavreux and Jade Lindgaard; edited by Edwy Plenel; first published by the French magazine Mediapart last October; and translated from the French for The Baffler by Donald Nicholson-Smith. Moderators: You both appear to think that the prevailing economic and financial system has run its course, and cannot endure much longer in its present form.

Understanding Knowledge as a Commons Knowledge in digital form offers unprecedented access to information through the Internet but at the same time is subject to ever-greater restrictions through intellectual property legislation, overpatenting, licensing, overpricing, and lack of preservation. Looking at knowledge as a commons—as a shared resource—allows us to understand both its limitless possibilities and what threatens it. In Understanding Knowledge as a Commons, experts from a range of disciplines discuss the knowledge commons in the digital era—how to conceptualize it, protect it, and build it. Contributors consider the concept of the commons historically and offer an analytical framework for understanding knowledge as a shared social-ecological system.

Quaternary sector of the economy The quaternary sector of the economy is a way to describe a knowledge-based part of the economy which typically includes services such as information generation and sharing, information technology, consultation, education, research and development, financial planning, and other knowledge-based services.[1][2] The term has been used to describe media, culture, and government.[3] "Quaternary sector" is a further delineation of the three-sector hypothesis of industry in the sense that the quarternary sector refers to a part of the third or tertiary sector along with the quinary economic sector. It has been argued that intellectual services is distinct enough to warrant a separate sector and not be considered merely as a part of the tertiary sector. This sector evolves in well developed countries and requires a highly educated workforce.[3]

Towards a Material Commons Transcripted from the original audio by Jane Loes Lipton for Guerrilla Translation!Main image by Stacco TroncosoThis transcript is also available as a Spanish translation Can commons-oriented peer production be applied to material production? Will activists and contributors to the commons always be forced to work within capitalist structures to subsist while investing their available free time in volunteer activities? How can we create socially-oriented companies without the start-up capital to fund them?

The Emerging Fourth Sector - FourthSector.net The Three Traditional Sectors Businesses create and distribute goods and services that enhance our quality of life, promote growth, and generate prosperity. They spur innovation, reward entrepreneurial effort, provide a return on investment and constantly improve their performance responding to market feedbacks. They draw on the skills, effort and ingenuity of individual workers, and share with them the economic value created by the enterprise.

Communicating the Commons << Outline View >> Back to Bubble View This is a work in progress. For the past couple of years I have collated and curated the possibilities, concepts, alternatives that people striving for a 'better world' were working on and talking about in various social network groups dedicated to sustainability, commons, new economy. Additions or changes are welcome here. The goal I thought of for the map is to make it easier: For change agents, activists, innovators, community & social entrepreneurs to recognize which spot or niche they occupy or wish to occupy within the possibility/action space so they can assert their position and adjust their action and discourse in relation to an overarching purpose and what is 'around' them.

The Limits of the Earth — Part 1: Problems (Credit: NASA) This is part one of a two-part series on the limits of human economic growth on planet Earth. Part one details some of the environmental and natural resource challenges we’re up against. Part two, on the ultimate size of the resource pool and solutions to our problems, will be published tomorrow and linked here. Both parts are based on Ramez Naam’s new book, The Infinite Resource: The Power of Ideas on a Finite Planet The world is facing incredibly serious natural resource and environmental challenges: Climate change, fresh water depletion, ocean over-fishing, deforestation, air and water pollution, the struggle to feed a planet of billions.

The Infinite Resource: The Power of Ideas on a Finite Planet “Brilliant” — Ray Kurzweil “This book contains a plan – probably the only plan – to save the world.” — Steven Pinker Climate change. Knowledge commons Conceptual background[edit] The term 'commons' is derived from the medieval economic system the commons. Today, the knowledge commons act as a frame of reference for a number of domains, including Open Educational resources such as the MIT OpenCourseware, free digital media such as Wikipedia, Creative commons–licensed art, open-source research,[2] and open scientific collections such as the Public Library of Science or the Science Commons, Free Software and Open Design. According to research by Charlotte Hess and Elinor Ostrom,[1] the conceptual background of the knowledge commons encompasses two intellectual histories: first, a European tradition of battling the enclosure of the "intangible commons of the mind",[3] threatened by expanding intellectual property rights and privatization of knowledge. Copyleft[edit]

The Limits of the Earth — Part 2: Expanding the Limits (Credit: NASA) This is part two of a two-part series on the limits of human economic growth on planet Earth. Part one details some of the environmental and natural resource challenges we’re up against. Part two, here, looks at the ultimate size of the resource pool and solutions to our problems.

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