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Companion Planting With Vegetables and Flowers - Organic Gardening

Companion Planting With Vegetables and Flowers - Organic Gardening
Each spring, I grow legions of onions and shallots from seed, and my biggest challenge is keeping them weeded. Last year, I planted pinches of arugula between the short rows of shallots, and the leafy, fast-growing arugula smothered any weeds and showed remarkably little damage from flea beetles, which often plague it. The arugula was ready to harvest just when the shallots needed room to grow. In a eureka moment, I realized I had discovered a vegetable companion-planting partnership I could use year after year to make my garden healthier and more productive. The idea of “companion planting” has been around for thousands of years, during which time it has become so besmirched with bad science and metaphysics that many gardeners aren’t sure what it means. The current definition goes something like this: Companion planting is the establishment of two or more species in close proximity so that some cultural benefit, such as pest control or increased yield, may be achieved. Measuring Success Related:  BastaBasta - povrtnjak

5 Foods You Can Grow From Leftovers | gardenswag Looking for yet another way to get more from your garden? How about regrowing vegetables from the leftover bits and pieces? Reduce, reuse and recycle in your garden with these five foods that you can keep growing (and regrowing) even after you've gotten a good meal or two out of them. Did you know that you can regrow celery from the leftover stalk stub? Whether you already grow ginger in your garden or have a few fresh nubs from the grocery store, it's possible to plant what you have and recycle your ginger roots. Not sure what to do with those couple of tiny garlic cloves that you can't be bothered to peel? Tired of throwing away all of those crazy-shaped ends from your garden-grown sweet potatoes? It just got even easier to grow green onions. (Images graciously provided by fritz018, jeff1980, forwardcom and 13dede .

Companion Planting W/ Veggies & Flowers « Round Valley Sustainability Guild Thank you Mary Jane for sending us this interesting article from Mother Earth news! Each spring, I grow legions of onions and shallots from seed, and my biggest challenge is keeping them weeded. Last year, I planted pinches of arugula between the short rows of shallots, and the leafy, fast-growing arugula smothered any weeds and showed remarkably little damage from flea beetles, which often plague it. The arugula was ready to harvest just when the shallots needed room to grow. In a eureka moment, I realized I had discovered a vegetable companion-planting partnership I could use year after year to make my garden healthier and more productive. Longtime MOTHER EARTH NEWS contributing editor Barbara Pleasant provides authoritative reporting on topics essential to helping you grow your own food as sustainably as possible. Like this: Like Loading...

companion planting - organic gardening How to Grow Brussels Sprouts | gardenswag Growing Brussels sprouts is like growing tiny, snack-sized cabbages on miniature palm trees. A cool-season crop that's relatively easy to grow, Brussels sprouts are nutritious, cruciferous (Brassica oleracea / Cruciferae) vegetables related to kale, cauliflower, broccoli, and (of course) cabbage plants. But, while its pedestrian vegetable cousins grow on the ground in plump, round balls, Brussels sprouts grow on huge, crazy stalks that can tower over other fall vegetables. If you're ready to give growing Brussels sprouts a try, remember that there are two main varieties: late-maturing cultivars that are taller and easier to harvest and early-maturing dwarf varieties that take up less space but are harder to harvest. Here are some quick-and-dirty tips for growing Brussels sprouts in your garden: Plant seeds 1 inch deep and 3 inches apart, and space plants in rows 24 to 36 inches apart. (Images graciously provided by nkzs, msm and debsch.

Edible Landscaping with Charlie Nardozzi The Three Sisters Garden garden of corn, beans, and squash is a good example of companion planting. The beans fix nitrogen in the soil, helping to feed the corn and squash plants. Plants, like people, have certain likes and dislikes when it comes to companions. Companion planting is a long-held idea that certain plants benefit each other when grown in close proximity. While this technique has been used for centuries in many traditional agricultural communities, companion planting has mixed results when scientifically tested. Maximize your planting space by growing vining crops, such as cucumbers, around climbing crops, such as pole beans. However, beyond these examples, many companion planting techniques are based on personal gardening experiences rather than scientific studies. Below is a chart from the National Sustainable Agriculture Information Service summarizing some of the common companion planting combinations that gardeners might use. Interplanting Other Hot Pepper Stories:

EarthWood - Companion Planting Guide In recent years many of the traditional herbal remedies used in earlier times have come back into favour. The use of herbs in tonics, teas and medicinal compounds has created a new interest in a variety of plants. Many culinary and medicinal herbs are strongly aromatic. Their pungency can act as a deterrent to many insects and garden pests and in this way they protect other more succulent plants from attack. Other flowering and herbal plants are used as trap plants, luring predators away from prized fruits and vegetables under cultivation. This technique of companion planting has come to be recognised as an effective way to reduce the need for unnatural pesticides in the home garden. As well as the pest repellent herbs, some flowers, such as marigold, calendula, zinnia, nasturtium and the white geranium not only brighten up the vegetable garden but repel pests while attracting bees and other natural pollinators necessary for a bountiful harvest of crops. Top of page Good Companions

How to Grow Cauliflower | gardenswag If you're looking for another fall vegetable to plant in your garden, consider growing cauliflower (Brassica oleracea / Cruciferae). Because this cruciferous vegetable is the most tempermental member of the Brassica clan, growing it is harder than growing cabbage plants and Brussels sprouts, but with the right planning and pampering, it's definitely do-able. Once seedlings begin to mature, growing cauliflower heads (called curds) sit on top of sturdy, low-growing stalks and look a lot like broccoli, with a tasty, central head that sits nestled in a bed of thick, cupped leaves that help shield the tender middle from harsh conditions and dirt. And, while most people think of cauliflower as only coming in the common creamy white cultivar, green and purple cauliflower also exist (and are just as tasty). If you're serious about growing cauliflower, you'll need to keep a watchful eye on temperature, watering and soil quality for this finicky grower.

Edible Landscaping with Charlie Nardozzi From February 2008 E-newsletter There are so many organic fertilizers available in garden centers today that growing organically couldn't be easier. Growing food organically is a hot topic across the country. Building up the fertility of the soil is one of the most important aspects of gardening. Why Fertilize? Just like our bodies need nutrients to function and grow, so do plants. What do plants need? To ensure that your soil has the right mix and balance of nutrients, you should do a soil test. Sprinkle organic fertilizers on a garden bed before planting and mix them into the top few inches of soil. The Advantage of Organics The purest form of organic fertilizer is a plant, animal, or mineral that is applied to the garden without any processing. Even if you use processed organic amendments, such as alfalfa meal, bonemeal, and greensand, you'll still get many of the advantages. This is not to say there isn't a place for synthetic fertilizers. Application Basics Types of Organic Fertilizers

Companion Planting - Vegetable Gardening Plant Companions and Combining Home > Companion gardening Companion planting and combining means growing plants together that like or benefit each other. Vegetable companion gardening can have a real impact on the health and yield of your plants. In nature everything interacts to create a whole life force. Every plant has an effect on every other plant and every creature has an effect on every other creature. Over time, gardeners have observed these interrelationships, and scientists have studied them. It’s well worth while reading a little bit about how and why companion planting is so important before we get into which specific plants go with what. . . . Plants, unlike many people, are not timid. They select and reject nutrients; they create in their structure and the environment, complex chemical compounds, such as perfumes, pollen, essential oils, growth inhibitors, hormones, enzymes and some minute trace elements. Nature's Way of Companion Planting The companion effect happens naturally in the wild. Uh oh...

Gardening 101, How To Grow Cucumbers, How To Process Cucumbers, And Medicinal Properties Of Cucumbers Your cucumbers will need a lot of attention, but given the proper care you will be able to harvest large amounts of cucumbers. Six cucumbers will produce enough cucumbers for a family of four through out the summer. Cucumbers require warm weather and they will mature quickly so they can be grown almost anywhere. Cucumbers grow from seed in 55 to 60 days. I would suggest that before you grow cucumbers that you provide them with something to grow on and it needs to be something stable because you are going to be dealing with a lot of weight. When you select your variety of cucumber to grow you will find a wide variety of choices. One important thing to do is to look for on the cucumber packages or in the seed catalogs is how disease resistant the cucumber you are thinking of planting is. Cucumbers need fertile soil with good drainage so its important that you pay careful attention to soil preparation for your cucumbers. Lets Grow Cucumbers Indoors How To Grow Cucumbers Indoors In Winter

How to grow Grow 100 pounds of potatoes in 4 steps Container gardening isn’t only for savvy urban gardeners and folks with limited space to grow, it can also be for folks who want to maximize their yields in a controlled environment. Not only does growing potatoes in a barrel reduce the amount of weeding and exposure to pests and fungi, you don’t even have to risk shovel-damage to the tender potatoes by digging them out of the ground when they’re done, just tip the container over! After extensive research to plan his own potatoes-in-a-barrel, Tim from Greenupgrader.com boiled all of the recommendations down to 4 simple steps to a winning potato harvest. 1. Select and prepare a container You’ll need to pick out a container such as a 50-gallon trash barrel or one of those half whiskey barrel planters. Good drainage is critical for the cultivation of healthy potatoes so you’ll want to cut or drill a series of large drainage holes in the bottom and bottom sides of your container. 2. 3. 4. Other tips to grow bushels of barrel potatoes

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