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Getting started – For families – Safety Center – Google

Getting started – For families – Safety Center – Google
Use Parental controls to filter apps by content rating You can use Parental controls to restrict the content that can be downloaded or purchased on Google Play. This helps you find appropriate content for you and your family. Learn more Open the Play Store app on your device. In the top left corner, tap the Menu icon. Turn Parental controls On. Choose the maturity level. Set a filter to keep inappropriate content out If you’d prefer to not to see mature or age-restricted content as you browse YouTube, scroll to the bottom of any YouTube page and enable Safety Mode. Learn more Scroll to the bottom of any YouTube page and click the drop-down menu in the “Safety” section. Select the On or Off option to enable or disable Safety Mode. To lock this setting, sign in to your Google Account. Once you're signed in, you will have the option to lock this setting.

https://www.google.com/safetycenter/families/start/

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A Bullying Quiz Printer-friendly version Objectives: Understand how evidence regarding behavioral patterns might challenge personal beliefs and assumptions about social behavior Use evidence about bullying behavior to inform daily decisions regarding social interactions and understand the necessity of making personal decisions in bullying situations Use factual information to consider consequences and alternatives of personal behavior choices IntroductionEven students who have experienced bullying might be surprised by the statistics and studies about bullying. It's important for adults, student leaders and other educators to raise awareness about the prevalence of bullying and its detrimental effects for all involved. The frequency with which students admit to bullying might surprise students who feel alone and isolated due to the wrath of a bully.

Introducing Social Media to Elementary Students Let me begin this post by saying, "I agree." I agree that students should have recess and play outside. I agree that young children need to interact in a face-to-face setting. I agree that it is developmentally critical to engage with paper, paint, blocks, crayons and even the dirt on the ground, because elementary students need to experience the physical world. MPP Stephen Carrick Davies Munch, Poke, Ping (MPP) * is a project which explores how social media and mobile phone technology affects young people’s peer relationships, behaviour and identity and how they cope when there is conflict online. The project is run by e-safety and child advocate Stephen Carrick-Davies. The project works directly with young people who are, or who feel, excluded and uses film-making to help ‘unlock’ and explore young people’s experience of growing up online. All the films on this website have been devised and acted by young people who have been excluded from main-stream school and are taught in Pupil Referral Units. What is unique about this project is that through the intensive workshops and film-making we have been able to caputre the authentic voices of young people, and then contrast these views with those from the dedicated staff who we filmed sharing about how they deal with these issues in their professional practice.

Building Your Google Resume Last week I was asked to give a talk to our high school students about CyberSafety. A yearly talk to remind them about the Internet and their responsibility on it….or that’s how I view it anyway. I was given 5 minutes at an assembly….5 minutes to cover the whole topic of CyberSafety. So the question became how do I make an impact in 5 minutes?

An Outstanding Internet Safety Cheat Sheet for Teachers and Parents Internet is like a jungle full of predators ready to take you down anytime you give them a chance. Strolling in this jungle sometimes comes with a very high cost, a cost that is way higher when it comes to kids. Online safety issues comes at the top priorities of parents. They all show a deep concern about their kids use of internet and the time they spend navigating the web but when asked about the preemtive measures to take to protect their kids, several parents hide behind the popular " I am not tech-savvy" excuse. Teaching digital citizenship across the whole curriculum By Dennis Pierce September 15th, 2015 Teaching digital citizenship as a “one-off event” doesn’t lead to changes in behavior, experts say When author and IT director Mike Ribble talks about the importance of teaching students appropriate online behavior, he likes to share a few eye-opening statistics. According to Common Sense Media’s study “Zero to Eight: Children’s Media Use in America,” the percentage of children ages eight and under who’ve used a mobile device nearly doubled from 2011 to 2013, from 38 percent to 72 percent. What’s more, about two in five children under the age of two have used a mobile device. “Kids are coming to school having already had some contact with technology,” said Ribble, who works for the Manhattan-Ogden Unified School District 383 in Kansas.

Cyberbullying If you would like to support NCPC's work on cyberbullying or any other campaign, please click here. If you’re like most teenagers, you spend a lot of time on a cell phone or instant messenger chatting with friends and uploading photos, videos, and music to websites. You may have online friends whom you’ve never met in person, with whom you play games and exchange messages. Teens’ lives exist in a variety of places such as school hallways, part-time jobs, and friends’ houses.

Keep Yourself and Your Stuff Safe Online" Digital Book for Teens by Linda McCarthy from Official Microsoft Download Center Own Your Space Teen Book\Own Your Space Teen Book _All Chapters.pdf Own Your Space Teen Book _All Chapters.xps Own Your Space Teen Book\Own Your Space_Chapter 01_Protect Your Turf.pdf Own Your Space Teen Book\Own Your Space_Chapter 02_Know Your Villains.pdf Own Your Space Teen Book\Own Your Space_Chapter 03_Nasty Ware.pdf Own Your Space Teen Book\Own Your Space_Chapter 04_Hackers and Crackers.pdf Digital Native vs Digital Citizen? Examining a Dangerous Stereotype There are a lot of dangerous stereotypes out there. "Asian students are always better at math." "Boys are always better at sports." And perhaps the most dangerous of all: "The current generation are all digital natives." It is easy to see the danger in the first two stereotypes. They tend to influence the way teachers, parents, peers and society in general classify, justify and treat whichever group is represented by the stereotype.

10 Interactive Lessons By Google On Digital Citizenship 10 Interactive Lessons By Google On Digital Citizenship Added by Jeff Dunn on 2012-07-22 YouTube has a firm place in the current classroom. From Khan Academy’s videos to YouTube EDU and beyond, there’s a reason all these videos are finding a home in schools. Olweus Bullying Prevention Program Welcome to the Clemson University website for the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program (OBPP). The Olweus Program (pronounced Ol-VAY-us) is a comprehensive approach that includes schoolwide, classroom, individual, and community components. The program is focused on long-term change that creates a safe and positive school climate. How to Teach Internet Safety to Younger Elementary Students Back in October, I wrote a post about Teaching Digital Citizenship in the Elementary Classroom. As it is Internet Safety Month, I want to share a sample lesson for teaching internet safety to students as young as kindergarten. Yes, you read correctly . . . kindergarten. With children spending time online at younger and younger ages, it is vital that we explicitly teach young children how to protect themselves online. Most young children get the "Stranger Danger" talk at school, so they know about how to handle strangers in their neighborhood and in face-to-face situations.

Web Wise Kids - Teacher/Parent Resources BeSeen Resources Download the BeSeen Classroom Lesson Materials MISSING Game Resources Internet Safety Plan MISSING Answer Key (requires registration/login) MISSING Certificate MISSING Detective Notebook MISSING Student Certificate of Completion MISSING Map MISSING Pre Game Survey MISSING Post Game Survey MISSING School Kit Welcome MISSING Sample Parent Letter Mirror Image / AirDogs Resources Download Issue Resolution Teacher Guide - AirDogs Teacher Guide - Mirror Image

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