background preloader

US teen invents advanced cancer test using Google

US teen invents advanced cancer test using Google
Related:  True Cancer ResearchEnlightened YouthMisc.

Chemotherapy 'encourages cancer' claim researchers - Health news Monday August 6 2012 Some chemotherapy drugs were damaging the DNA of healthy cells “Chemotherapy can actually boost the growth of cancer cells, making the disease harder to fight,” the Metro has gloomily reported. The newspaper's claim focuses on some research that could explain a frustrating problem in cancer treatment: the majority of advanced cancers, where the cancer has spread to multiple parts of the body (metastatic cancer), become resistant to chemotherapy treatment. This means that most metastatic cancers are incurable. This news is based on a study looking at cancer tissue and cells in the laboratory and in mice. This interesting research has identified a way in which cancer treatment resistance may be induced by the effects of the chemotherapy treatment itself on the cells surrounding the tumour. While this may sound like bad news, gaining a greater understanding of how this resistance may come about is very valuable. Where did the story come from? What kind of research was this?

The Life and Afterlife of Aaron Swartz Years before he hanged himself in his Crown Heights apartment, the hacker, writer, and activist Aaron Swartz used to debate with his then-girlfriend Quinn Norton whether the Internet would mourn him if he died. It was Swartz’s stubborn belief that no one would notice or care if he died young, as he often thought he was fated to do. Like many young men of great promise and fluctuating moods, Swartz was an unstable compound of self-effacement and self-regard—among the most empowered, well-connected young people in America, yet convinced that his very existence was a burden to others, even those who loved him. There is a category of young person able to do things like contribute to the building of the Internet in their teens, or sell their tech start-ups for millions of dollars when they are 19, or rally a million opponents to a major piece of legislation when they are in their twenties. By the time he was 17, Swartz had already secured a permanent legacy written in code.

New technology can print 3D blood vessels in mere seconds Washington, September 14 (ANI): Nanoengineers at the University of California, San Diego have developed a novel technology that can fabricate, in mere seconds, microscale three dimensional (3D) structures out of soft, biocompatible hydrogels. Near term, the technology could lead to better systems for growing and studying cells, including stem cells, in the laboratory. Long-term, the goal is to be able to print biological tissues for regenerative medicine. For example, in the future, doctors may repair the damage caused by heart attack by replacing it with tissue that rolled off of a printer. The biofabrication technology, called dynamic optical projection stereolithography (DOPsL), was developed in the laboratory of NanoEngineering Professor Shaochen Chen. Current fabrication techniques, such as photolithography and micro-contact printing, are limited to generating simple geometries or 2D patterns.

Forensic psychologist says mass killing is about culture, not mental illness The story is familiar to us today: Somebody, usually a young man, walks into a public place, kills a bunch of people seemingly at random, and (usually) ends the murder spree with a suicide-by-cop. But this story—at least, in Western culture—is startlingly new, relatively speaking. In fact, Paul Mullen, a forensic psychologist, says we can pin a date and place on the first time it happened. But when we try to pin killings like these on mental illness, Mullen says, we're not quite hitting the right point. I’m not saying the movies made Holmes crazy or psychopathic or some such. This is an interesting argument and an interesting thing to think about. Read the rest of David Dobbs' post about the difference between blaming movies for violence and talking about the consequences of violence in culture. Watch the video of Paul Mullen discussing cultural violence, mental illness, and spree killings

ben's blog 55-year-old former model battles breast cancer with diet changes; refuses chemo and surgery (NaturalNews) The story of former model Jessica Richards' battle with cancer is a remarkable one, especially because it has defected from the use of conventional treatments like chemotherapy, radiation, or surgery. In her book The Topic of Cancer, Richards explains how following a strict metabolic diet and receiving high-dose intravenous injections of vitamin C has helped successfully reverse the progression of her breast cancer, to the shock of many conventional doctors. It is a story you will likely never hear from the mainstream media, at least not from the perspective of being taken seriously, and yet it is one that people desperately need to hear. After learning that she had an unusually large tumor in one of her breasts, Richards was told by her doctors that she would need to begin an aggressive treatment protocol that involved removing the breast, having it reconstructed, and undergoing an intense series of radiation and hormone treatments to keep it at bay.

Malala Yousafzai Malala Yousafzai (Pashto: ملاله یوسفزۍ‎ [mə ˈlaː lə . ju səf ˈzəj];[2] Urdu: ملالہ یوسف زئی‎ Malālah Yūsafzay, born 12 July 1997)[3] is a Pakistani school pupil and education activist from the town of Mingora in the Swat District of Pakistan's northwestern Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province. She is known for her activism for rights to education and for women, especially in the Swat Valley, where the Taliban had at times banned girls from attending school. In early 2009, at the age of 11–12, Yousafzai wrote a blog under a pseudonym for the BBC detailing her life under Taliban rule, their attempts to take control of the valley, and her views on promoting education for girls. The following summer, a New York Times documentary by journalist Adam B. Ellick was filmed about her life as the Pakistani military intervened in the region, culminating in the Second Battle of Swat. On the morning of Tuesday, 9 October 2012, Malala boarded her school bus in the northwest Pakistani district of Swat. Refugee

Testicles Of Yogurt-Eating Mice Shown Bigger, And Researchers Credit Probiotics Last sum­mer a team of researchers from the Massa­chusetts Institute of Technology set out to better understand the effects of yogurt on obesity. They were following up on the results of a long-term study from the Harvard School of Public Health that had suggested yogurt, more than any other food, helped to prevent age-related weight gain. The M.I.T. team, led by cancer biologist Susan Erdman and evolutionary geneticist Eric Alm, wanted to replicate the work in mice. Their goal was to understand how a probiotic diet affects rates of obesity and its related compli­ca­tions, including cancer. First, the scientists noticed that the yogurt-eating mice were incredibly shiny. Then the researchers spotted some­thing particular about the males: they projected their testes outward, which endowed them with a certain “mouse swagger,” Erdman says. More important, that masculinity pays off. The findings could have implications for human fertility. Also on HuffPost:

Send Postcards That Smell Like Favorite Foods Ever wanted to sniff your foodie friends’ photos? Well one student in China has a concept to capture the aroma of food on a postcard. The ‘food printer’ would use a camera to take the picture and a smell extractor to collect the aroma simultaneously, then prints a postcard with aroma ink. We worked with 10 Sony designers for nine days and nights. Sony’s Student Design Workshop The 20 most-watched TED Talks to date TEDTalks The 20 most-watched TEDTalks (so far) Today, on the fifth birthday of TEDTalks video, we’re releasing a new list of the 20 most-watched TEDTalks over the past five years — as watched on all the platforms we track: TED.com, YouTube, iTunes, embed and download, Hulu and more … What a great, mixed-up group this is! Playlist The 20 most popular TED Talks, as of December 2013 UPDATED: To see all these talks at one click, check out our updated Playlist: The 20 Most Popular Talks of All Time.

Grandfather with 'incurable' cancer is given the all-clear after swapping red meat and dairy products for 10 fruit and veg a day Doctors told Allan Taylor, 78, in April that his cancer couldn't be treated and had spread from his colon to his small intestineIn August the retired oil rig engineer from Middlesbrough got another letter - to say he was cancer-freeHe puts the change down to his new diet, which he adopted after looking up 'colon cancer cures' on the internet By Rob Preece Published: 14:30 GMT, 16 September 2012 | Updated: 08:26 GMT, 17 September 2012 A grandfather, who was told by doctors that his cancer was 'incurable', has been given the all-clear less than four months later - after trying a different diet. Allan Taylor could have been forgiven for fearing the worst when doctors told him they could do nothing to treat his condition. But the 78-year-old would not give up, and instead searched the internet for an alternative method to fight his cancer. Given the all-clear: Allan Taylor, 78, beat cancer by changing his diet and taking herbal remedies

A Urine Powered Generator : Maker Faire Africa Posted on Tuesday, November 6, 2012 · 168 Comments Possibly one of the more unexpected products at Maker Faire Africa this year in Lagos is a urine powered generator, created by four girls. The girls are Duro-Aina Adebola (14), Akindele Abiola (14), Faleke Oluwatoyin (14) and Bello Eniola (15). 1 Liter of urine gives you 6 hours of electricity. The system works like this: Urine is put into an electrolytic cell, which separates out the hydrogen. Along the whole way there are one-way valves for security, but let’s be honest that this is something of an explosive device…

Related: