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How Friends Ruin Memory: The Social Conformity Effect

How Friends Ruin Memory: The Social Conformity Effect
Humans are storytelling machines. We don’t passively perceive the world – we tell stories about it, translating the helter-skelter of events into tidy narratives. This is often a helpful habit, helping us make sense of mistakes, consider counterfactuals and extract a sense of meaning from the randomness of life. But our love of stories comes with a serious side-effect: like all good narrators, we tend to forsake the facts when they interfere with the plot. We’re so addicted to the anecdote that we let the truth slip away until, eventually, those stories we tell again and again become exercises in pure fiction. Just the other day I learned that one of my cherished childhood tales – the time my older brother put hot peppers in my Chinese food while I was in the bathroom, thus scorching my young tongue – actually happened to my little sister. The reason we’re such consummate bullshitters is simple: we bullshit for each other. Here’s where the fMRI data proved useful.

http://www.wired.com/2011/10/how-friends-ruin-memory-the-social-conformity-effect/

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