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Egypt/Main Page - We Re-Build

Egypt/Main Page - We Re-Build
Related:  Egypt protests

Timeline: Egypt unrest - Middle East January 2011: Activists in Egypt call for an uprising in their own country, to protest against poverty, unemployment, government corruption and the rule of president Hosni Mubarak, who has been in power for three decades. January 25: On a national holiday to commemorate the police forces, Egyptians take to the streets in large numbers, calling it a "day of rage". Thousands march in downtown Cairo, heading towards the offices of the ruling National Democratic Party, as well as the foreign ministry and the state television. After a few hours of relative calm, police and demonstrators clash; police fire tear gas and use water cannons against demonstrators crying out "Down with Mubarak'' in Cairo's main Tahrir Square. Protests break out in the Mediterranean city of Alexandria, the Nile Delta cities of Mansura and Tanta and in the southern cities of Aswan and Assiut, witnesses say. Protest organisers heavily relied on social media outlets such as Facebook and Twitter.

Telecomix Egypt Shuts Off Tech, Tries to Shut Up Protesters The Egyptian government, facing mass protests in the nation's streets by citizens calling for regime change, has shut off the Internet, SMS, and BlackBerry service--and may have shuttered some mobile phone systems too. Now the population is turning to 20th century solutions. Earlier this week we wrote about mass pro-democracy protests on the streets of Egypt's cities, which were organized--at least in part--using social media like Twitter and Facebook, and with the same sites, along with Twitpic and its peers being used to share news and video and photo evidence about real-time events. The government resisted the protests physically on the streets, but also launched a digital offensive--first shutting off access to Twitter on Wednesday, then Facebook on Thursday. Now Internet access across the whole nation has been shut off, as the Net traffic volume chart from Arbor Networks embedded here shows.

Telecomix: Hacking for freedom On January 28, 2011, the Egyptian government cut the Internet. A black out of such magnitude was unprecedented. Behind the scenes, a small group of citizens from around the world tried to find alternative means of communication for Egyptians. At the front lines was Telecomix – an entity that seemingly has no boundaries. On July 8, thousands of demonstrators flooded Tahrir Square in protest. Anas al-Fiqqi was declared innocent. Al-Fiqqi, previous intelligence Minster, was acquitted on July 5 after having been accused of embezzling public money to finance his party’s election campaigns (along with Moubarak’s campaigns). On January 28, 2011, access providers complied with the Egyptian governments injunctions to suspend Internet services, causing a 90% decline in traffic. Out of 80 million inhabitants, 20 million Internet users and 55 million mobile phone users were deprived of communication for five days. No precise plan of action At the front lines of this movements was Telecomix.

Protests in Egypt - live updates | News Egypt's biggest demonstrations yet are planned today following Friday prayers, in the face of an increasing crackdown by the authorities. Overnight several senior members of the Muslim Brotherhood were arrested after the organisation pledged to take part in the demonstrations for the first time. To date the demonstrations have been largely secular, as they were in Tunisia. The support of the Brotherhood could well change the calculus on the streets, tipping the numbers in favour of the protesters and away from the police, lending new strength to the demonstrations and further imperiling president Hosni Mubarak's reign of nearly three decades. Last night Mohamed ElBaradei, the former UN nuclear weapons inspector often named as a leading reformist candidate to replace Mubarak, flew into Cairo calling for a new regime in Egypt. "I was stunned to hear secretary Clinton saying the Egyptian government is stable. The US has continued to send out ambiguous statements about Egypt. It said: @beleidy

Cable Viewer Viewing cable 10CAIRO181, Scenesetter for Admiral Mullen Understanding cables Every cable message consists of three parts: The top box shows each cables unique reference number, when and by whom it originally was sent, and what its initial classification was.The middle box contains the header information that is associated with the cable. It includes information about the receiver(s) as well as a general subject.The bottom box presents the body of the cable. The opening can contain a more specific subject, references to other cables (browse by origin to find them) or additional comment. This is followed by the main contents of the cable: a summary, a collection of specific topics and a comment section. Discussing cables If you find meaningful or important information in a cable, please link directly to its unique reference number.

Cable Viewer Viewing cable 10CAIRO147, A/S POSNER PRESSES GOE ON POLICE BRUTALITY, NGO Understanding cables Every cable message consists of three parts: The top box shows each cables unique reference number, when and by whom it originally was sent, and what its initial classification was.The middle box contains the header information that is associated with the cable. It includes information about the receiver(s) as well as a general subject.The bottom box presents the body of the cable. The opening can contain a more specific subject, references to other cables (browse by origin to find them) or additional comment. Discussing cables If you find meaningful or important information in a cable, please link directly to its unique reference number.

Cable Viewer Viewing cable 09CAIRO1447, RECENT GOE ACTIONS TO SUPPRESS CRITICAL OPINION Understanding cables Every cable message consists of three parts: The top box shows each cables unique reference number, when and by whom it originally was sent, and what its initial classification was.The middle box contains the header information that is associated with the cable. It includes information about the receiver(s) as well as a general subject.The bottom box presents the body of the cable. The opening can contain a more specific subject, references to other cables (browse by origin to find them) or additional comment. Discussing cables If you find meaningful or important information in a cable, please link directly to its unique reference number. C O N F I D E N T I A L SECTION 01 OF 02 CAIRO 001447 SIPDIS FOR NEA/ELA AND DRL/NESCA NSC FOR KUMAR E.O. 12958: DECL: 07/28/2029 TAGS: PGOV PHUM KDEM EG SUBJECT: RECENT GOE ACTIONS TO SUPPRESS CRITICAL OPINION REF: A.

Egypt Leaves the Internet Thanks to all for great comments and questions. Please see below for latest updates on the ongoing Egyptian Internet blackout, including some trace-based analysis and a few words about neighboring countries. After this morning we’ll be closing this post out, and looking for the restoration. Hopefully sooner than later. –jim Confirming what a few have reported this evening: in an action unprecedented in Internet history, the Egyptian government appears to have ordered service providers to shut down all international connections to the Internet. At 22:34 UTC (00:34am local time), Renesys observed the virtually simultaneous withdrawal of all routes to Egyptian networks in the Internet’s global routing table. This is a completely different situation from the modest Internet manipulation that took place in Tunisia, where specific routes were blocked, or Iran, where the Internet stayed up in a rate-limited form designed to make Internet connectivity painfully slow. Update (3:06 UTC Friday)

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