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The biology of dreaming

The biology of dreaming
o one would normally consider David Maurice, Ph.D., professor of ocular physiology in the Department of Ophthalmology at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, a revolutionary. Nevertheless, he has reignited a decades-long controversy that could spark a revolutionary re-evaluation of an entire field of behavioral research. Dr. Maurice has developed a startling new line of scientific inquiry that, when added to other findings, could change our understanding of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and the nature of dreams. What Maurice has done is to suggest an alternative explanation for the phenomenon known as REM sleep, the stage in which the eyes rapidly move and most dreams occur. Dr. "Without REM," Maurice told 21stC, "our corneas would starve and suffocate while we are asleep with our eyes closed." Maurice's interest in REM began a few years ago. "What is at stake here is a theory of dreams that is scientifically valid," Dr. Interpretation vs. observation Drs. No final answer in sight 1.

http://www.columbia.edu/cu/21stC/issue-3.4/breecher.html

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Melon: A Headband and Mobile App to Measure Your Focus by Melon Could you transform how you work? Improve the way you meditate? Find a new way to be creative? Melon is a headband and mobile app duo that tracks and helps you improve your focus in relation to your activity, your environment, your emotions, and any other behavior you want to track. From the beginning, the Melon headband was built to be worn while engaging in a variety of activities; from working, to studying, playing sports, dancing, practicing an instrument, programming, painting, or doing yoga. The Melon sensor turns focus into something measurable, understandable, and improvable.

Blue light, sleep, mental alertness and health By Vince Giuliano We are being exposed to a lot more blue and ultraviolet light in recent years, especially at night. This is due to 1. fluorescent bulbs replacing incandescent bulbs in homes and workspaces, especially “daytime” spectrum bulbs, 2. Top 10 Amazing Facts About Dreams Facts This afternoon I had a (very rare) nap. During that nap I had a lucid dream (most of which I no longer remember). As I was waking up, I was thinking about my dream and thought that it would be a great idea to write a list about dreams for the site. So, here are the top 10 amazing facts about dreams.

Out-Of-Body Experiences and Lucid Dreams [From NIGHTLIGHT 3(2-3), 1991, Copyright, The Lucidity Institute.] ======================================================================== OTHER WORLDS: OUT-OF-BODY EXPERIENCES AND LUCID DREAMS by Lynne Levitan and Stephen LaBerge, Ph.D. ======================================================================== "Out of body" experiences (OBEs) are personal experiences during which people feel as if they are perceiving the physical world from a location outside of their physical bodies. At least 5 and perhaps as many as 35 of every 100 people have had an OBE at least once in their lives (Blackmore, 1982). OBEs are highly arousing; they can be either deeply disturbing or profoundly moving.

Updated Post: What Happens to Your Body If You Drink a Coke Right Now? « : Blisstree - Serious Health and Wellness – Injected With Humor Hey, Blisstree Reader! We recently updated this Coke post, and also just posted two brand-new ones: What Happens to Your Body After You Drink a Coke Every Day, For a Long Time and Drink Diet Coke For Good Health? Not So Much., which many of you commented on wanting to know more about.

How to Stop Worrying Undoing the Worrying Habit Once acquired, the habit of worrying seems hard to stop. We're raised to worry and aren't considered "grown up" until we perfect the art. Teenagers are told: "you'd better start worrying about your future". If your worries aren't at least as frequent as your bowel movements, you're seen as irresponsible, childish, aimless. That's a "responsible adult" game rule. Really? Using a Computer Before Bed Can Disrupt Sleep Really? Anahad O’Connor tackles health myths. In today’s gadget-obsessed world, sleep experts often say that for a better night’s rest, Americans should click the “off” buttons on their smartphones and tablets before tucking in for the night. Electronic devices stimulate brain activity, they say, disrupting your ability to drift off to sleep. But according to the National Sleep Foundation, more than 90 percent of Americans regularly use a computer or electronic device of some kind in the hour before bed.

Dreams: Night School The Dream Robbers What happens when a rat stops dreaming ? In 2004, researchers at the University of Wisconsin at Madison decided to find out. Their method was simple, if a bit devilish.

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