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A Simple, Responsive, Mobile First Navigation

A Simple, Responsive, Mobile First Navigation
We're going to build a simple, responsive web site navigation. Our solution will help us place emphasis on the content of our page, arguably the top priority when designing for mobile. There'll be no JavaScript involved, and we'll tackle it from a Mobile First approach. Mobile Navigation If you've read Luke Wroblewski's Mobile First you'll be familiar with his statement that: As a general rule, content takes precedence over navigation on mobile. What he means by this is that mobile users are often looking for immediate answers; they want the content they went searching for, not more navigation options. Many sites, even responsive ones, stick to the convention that navigation belongs at the top of any given page. Take this example from London & Partners: A perfectly decent responsive design, but at standard mobile viewport dimensions (320px x 480px) all you really see is a navigation menu. So What are the Solutions? Big screen, little screen. Pure CSS Solution Step 1: Markup Step 3: CSS Reset Related:  CSS3

25 Beautiful Responsive Web Design Examples for Inspiration Six Revisions Menu Main Categories CSS HTML JavaScript Web Design WordPress Web Development Design Inspiration UX Design UI Design Freebies Tutorials Tools Links About Contact Advertise RSS Twitter Facebook 25 Beautiful Responsive Web Design Examples for Inspiration By Jacob Gube Responsive web design is the practice of enhancing the experience of the user by adapting the web page layout to the device he or she is using when accessing the site. Check out the beautiful responsive website layouts below for inspiration in your own responsive web design projects. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. Related Content About the Author Jacob Gube is the Founder and Chief Editor of Six Revisions. This was published on Sep 15, 2012 Previous PostNext Post 33 Comments Georgios Sep 15 2012 I am anxious to the further development of responsive web design. Rumjhum Sep 16 2012 This collection is a bunch of fresh grapes which act as a mind appetizer for me. Jacob,

Recreating the OS X Dock with CSS - ZURB Playground - ZURB.com The CSS The HTML <ul class="osx-dock"><li class="active"><span>ZURB</span><a href=" title="ZURB"><img src="/playground/osx-dock/zurb-icon.png" /></a></li><li><span>LinkedIn</span><a href=" title="LinkedIn"><img src="/playground/osx-dock/linkedin-icon.png" /></a></li></ul> Copyright ZURB, freely available for distribution under the MIT license. Product Design Training from the Experts at ZURB This is a default modal in all its glory, but any of the styles here can easily be changed in the CSS. This is just a simple modal with the default styles, but any type of content can live in here.

Response JS: mobile-first responsive design in HTML5. Creating Polaroid Style Images with Just CSS - ZURB Playground - ZURB.com Through a combination of browser-specific CSS (2 and 3) integration and some basic styling, we've turned regular old images into cool looking polaroid style images—with no additional markup to show the text. Using the Title Attribute Instead of adding additional markup (more headings or paragraphs), we've opted to reuse the content within the title attribute of the surrounding anchor tag. Since it's good practice to use proper title text, and it's really freaking cool to do stuff with just CSS. Note: this is from the CSS2.1 spec, but browsers haven't implemented it fully. We have to use the title attribute for the anchor because the alt attribute isn't fully implemented by Safari or Firefox. Adding "Random" Tilts Safari 4 and Firefox 3.5 both have support for the :nth-child pseudo-selector (this is CSS3). Read about :nth-child and it's usage here. Although this seems like a bit much, this works to our advantage. Making Them Scale For the scaling, we once again turn to some CSS3.

Overthrow: An overflow polyfill for responsive design Posted by Scott on 02/22/2012 Topics: accessibility css javascript mobile responsive design We’ve come to take the CSS overflow property for granted when designing websites for desktop browsers. But overflow support among mobile devices is spotty: some browsers support it, but many popular ones at best require 2-finger gestures to scroll the content, and at worst treat the content the same as overflow: hidden, making it inaccessible to users. So we set out to build a solution that smoothes the way. Overthrow Project Site For cross-device overflow, no perfect solutions Overflow support is gaining rapidly in newer versions of mobile browsers. This leaves us with a dilemma. First, we looked to a number of popular open-source projects that bring overflow support to touch devices to see whether any would satisfy our requirements. Most importantly, we wanted an approach that is designed to slowly kill itself off, allowing native implementations to do their thing as support becomes better and better.

An Awesome CSS3 Lightbox Gallery With jQuery Martin Angelov In this tutorial we are going to create an awesome image gallery which leverages the latest CSS3 and jQuery techniques. The script will be able to scan a folder of images on your web server and build a complete drag and drop lighbox gallery around it. It will be search-engine friendly and even be compatible with browsers which date back as far as IE6 (although some of the awesomeness is lost). We are using jQuery, jQuery UI (for the drag and drop) and the fancybox jQuery plugin for the lightbox display in addition to PHP and CSS for interactivity and styling. Before reading on, I would suggest that you download the example files and have the demo opened in a tab for reference. So lets start with step one. Step 1 – XHTML The main idea is to have PHP as a back-end which will generate the necessary XHTML for each image. demo.php <div id="gallery"><? Nothing too fancy here. The gallery Step 2 – CSS Now that we have all the markup in place, it is time to style it. demo.css Step 3 – PHP

A Guide to Mobile Emulators In a previous article, I put forward a three-point plan for testing mobile Web sites. One of the points involved the use of emulators for first-pass device testing. This article concentrates on configuring emulators for mobile site testing (it also highlights emulators that can be used to test mobile applications too). It outlines the different types of emulator available, the best ones to use, and the various ways in which they can be used. For the uninitiated, an emulator is a software program that aims to replicate the functions of a specific piece of hardware or software. About Device-Specific Testing Desktop Web developers have it relatively easy – build in support for four or five browsers, and it’s job done. The simple answer is – you can’t. Types of Mobile Emulator Mobile emulators fall into three main categories: Device emulators - These are generally provided by device manufacturers and simulate the actual device. Problems with Emulators Popular Emulators Opera MiniOpenwave

CSS3 Transitions — Thank God We Have A Specification! Advertisement This article is packed with a number of quirks and issues you should be aware of when working with CSS3 transitions. Please note that I’m not showing any workarounds or giving advice on how to circumvent the issues discussed. Alex MacCaw has already written a very insightful and thorough article on “All You Need to Know About CSS Transitions.” Whereas Alex wrote about achieving particular effects, I’m going to talk about the technical background, especially the JavaScript-facing side. Pitfalls — this article is all about pitfalls. 01. Separation of concerns is nothing new — we’ve been using template engines for years to accomplish exactly that, separating our HTML from whatever scripting language we were using. A couple of weeks ago, I was tasked with developing a JavaScript module that would allow for the use of CSS transitions in a way that the JavaScript side would know nothing about the transitions taking place. “Not knowing is difficult to handle. 1. Timing Functions

CSS Grid Template Layout Module Abstract Above: a typical Web page. Below: the underlying grid template. CSS is a simple, declarative language for creating style sheets that specify the rendering of HTML and other structured documents. The ‘grid’ property sets up a matrix of rows and columns and designates empty areas and areas for content (called “slots”). The ‘::slot()’ pseudo-element allows to style the slots (backgrounds, borders, etc.) Grid templates can also be associated with pages in paged media, to create page templates. Slots can form “chains” to create non-rectangular regions. The ‘@region’ rule [CSS3-REGIONS] allows to select (parts of) elements based on whether they fall in a certain slot or not, and thus style content differently in different slots (region-based styling). Status of this document This is a public copy of the editors' draft. The (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org (see instructions) is preferred for discussion of this specification. Table of contents 1. 1.1. Try it out! resp Method 1

The Definitive Guide to CSS Transitions Back in the golden days of the web, we had a little thing called Flash to help us make the web a dynamic, fun, interactive place. But, Flash is being used less and less. Of course, in certain environments it can still be put to amazing use, but in today’s web environment you need CSS to get the job done. One of the easiest ways to give your site a near-instant facelift is to bring CSS3 transitions to the table (pun intended). Drop this into an HTML document and check it out: Yeah, I know gray boxes aren’t all that exciting, but the point is that the transitions on the box to the right are more interesting and give the design a more polished feel. Pseudo-Classes for CSS Transitions The key to making CSS transitions work is through the use of pseudo-classes. Here we have the CSS element for a link and the pseudo-class “hover” for when the mouse is over the link. Some other important pseudo-classes you need to know for CSS transitions include: Introducing CSS Transitions Beyond :hover and Links

CSS Flexible Box Layout Module Abstract The specification describes a CSS box model optimized for user interface design. In the flex layout model, the children of a flex container can be laid out in any direction, and can “flex” their sizes, either growing to fill unused space or shrinking to avoid overflowing the parent. Both horizontal and vertical alignment of the children can be easily manipulated. Nesting of these boxes (horizontal inside vertical, or vertical inside horizontal) can be used to build layouts in two dimensions. CSS is a language for describing the rendering of structured documents (such as HTML and XML) on screen, on paper, in speech, etc. Status of this document This section describes the status of this document at the time of its publication. Publication as a Last Call Working Draft does not imply endorsement by the W3C Membership. The (archived) public mailing list www-style@w3.org (see instructions) is preferred for discussion of this specification. Table of Contents 1 Introduction flex layout . The

35 Useful CSS3 Tutorials To Boost Your Skills Good CSS3 tutorials can teach you the tricks and techniques used by experienced web designers and developers to implement a specific solution. Looking the experts over the shoulders is also a great way to pick up fresh inspiration and further to see that something your client is asking for can actually be done. A great CSS3 tutorial providing clever solutions to requirements you need to fulfill may be a great time saver and therefore may kick-start a project. CSS is for styling and controlling layout of webpages. While CSS3has become very powerful it is often used with JavaScript / jQuery to add cool dynamic stuff. If you are not familiar with the possibilities offered from jQuery you may also want to seek some wisdom in jQuery tutorials. In this article we have collected some of the best CSS3 tutorials we have been able to find. Advertisement Create an animated 3d bar chart using CSS3 This is a tutorial on how to create an animated 3d bar chart using CSS only. CSS3 pricing table

Responsive Navigation | Examples of Navigation in Responsive Design ZenCSSPropertiesEn - zen-coding - CSS-properties and its aliases for Zen CSS plugins - Set of plugins for HTML and CSS hi-speed coding Based on CSS 3 draft specification Property Alias Special Rules @import url(); @i @media print { @m } ! expression() exp Properties Groups Sorting Methods Positioning Box behavior and properties Sizing Color appearance Special content types Text Visual properties Print Positioning position:; posposition:static; pos:sposition:absolute; pos:aposition:relative; pos:rposition:fixed; pos:f top:; ttop:auto; t:a right:; rright:auto; r:a bottom:; bbottom:auto; b:a left:; lleft:auto; l:a z-index:; zz-index:auto; z:a Box behavior and properties float:; flfloat:none; fl:nfloat:left; fl:lfloat:right; fl:r clear:; clclear:none; cl:nclear:left; cl:lclear:right; cl:rclear:both; cl:b visibility:; vvisibility:visible; v:vvisibility:hidden; v:hvisibility:collapse; v:c overflow:; ovoverflow:visible; ov:voverflow:hidden; ov:hoverflow:scroll; ov:soverflow:auto; ov:a overflow-x:; ovxoverflow-x:visible; ovx:voverflow-x:hidden; ovx:hoverflow-x:scroll; ovx:soverflow-x:auto; ovx:a zoom:1; zoo Sizing width:; wwidth:auto; w:a Text Print

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