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How Apple and Amazon Security Flaws Led to My Epic Hacking

How Apple and Amazon Security Flaws Led to My Epic Hacking
In the space of one hour, my entire digital life was destroyed. First my Google account was taken over, then deleted. Next my Twitter account was compromised, and used as a platform to broadcast racist and homophobic messages. And worst of all, my AppleID account was broken into, and my hackers used it to remotely erase all of the data on my iPhone, iPad, and MacBook. In many ways, this was all my fault. My accounts were daisy-chained together. Had I been regularly backing up the data on my MacBook, I wouldn’t have had to worry about losing more than a year’s worth of photos, covering the entire lifespan of my daughter, or documents and e-mails that I had stored in no other location. Those security lapses are my fault, and I deeply, deeply regret them. But what happened to me exposes vital security flaws in several customer service systems, most notably Apple’s and Amazon’s. This isn’t just my problem. I realized something was wrong at about 5 p.m. on Friday. Lulz. “Wait. “Mr.

http://www.wired.com/2012/08/apple-amazon-mat-honan-hacking/

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25 Worst Passwords of 2011 Pro tip: choosing "password" as your online password is not a good idea. In fact, unless you're hoping to be an easy target for hackers, it's the worst password you can possibly choose. "Password" ranks first on password management application provider SplashData's annual list of worst internet passwords, which are ordered by how common they are. ("Passw0rd," with a numeral zero, isn't much smarter, ranking 18th on the list.) The list is somewhat predictable: Sequences of adjacent numbers or letters on the keyboard, such as "qwerty" and "123456," and popular names, such as "ashley" and "michael," all are common choices.

“The Equation group:” Hackers have infected computers worldwide with the sneakiest malware ever NEW YORK (CNNMoney) — A shadowy hacking group has infected computers at companies, universities and governments worldwide with the sneakiest malware ever. That’s according to a report Monday, February 16th by Internet security company Kaspersky, which described a hacking campaign “that exceeds anything we have ever seen before.” The mysterious group, which researchers nicknamed “the Equation group,” uses malware that’s unusually quiet, complex and powerful. And in some cases, it planted spyware on computers’ firmware, the programming that lives permanently on hardware. It’s an unheard-of move that means the malware can avoid detection by antivirus software.

Here’s What Happened At Fluent Fluent is shutting down, or so you may have heard. It’s no surprise that a startup has failed – most do. It’s no surprise that an ambitious, bite-off-more-than-you-can-chew startup that went so far as to proclaim it was inventing “the future of email” is shutting down – that’s a hefty order for anyone to fill. And it’s no surprise that a company based in Australia (which to most VC’s may as well be the moon), couldn’t raise enough funding to continue …well, that’s no surprise, but it’s pretty sad. What may end up being the bigger takeaway here for anyone daring to tackle one of those frighteningly ambitious startup ideas is that they should know that they’re taking on a damned near impossible task.

Teenage Hacker "Cosmo the God" Sentenced by California Court “Cosmo the God” in a park near his home in Long Beach, California. Photo: Sandra Garcia/Wired The 15-year-old UG Nazi hacker known as Cosmo* or Cosmo the God was sentenced in juvenile court on Wednesday in Long Beach, California. According to Cosmo, he pleaded guilty to multiple felonies in exchange for a probation, encompassing all the charges brought against him, which included charges based on credit card fraud, identity theft, bomb threats, and online impersonation. A brief Sony password analysis So the Sony saga continues. As if the whole thing about 77 million breached PlayStation Network accounts wasn’t bad enough, numerous other security breaches in other Sony services have followed in the ensuing weeks, most recently with SonyPictures.com. As bad guys often like to do, the culprits quickly stood up and put their handiwork on show.

Meet the men who spy on women through their webcams "See! That shit keeps popping up on my fucking computer!" says a blond woman as she leans back on a couch, bottle-feeding a baby on her lap. The woman is visible from thousands of miles away on a hacker's computer. The hacker has infected her machine with a remote administration tool (RAT) that gives him access to the woman's screen, to her webcam, to her files, to her microphone. He watches her and the baby through a small control window open on his Windows PC, then he decides to have a little fun. First-Time Startup Entrepreneurs: Stop Fucking Around Editor’s note: Paul Stamatiou is Co-founder of Picplum, a Y Combinator-backed photo printing service, where he obsesses over both design and development. He also co-founded Notifo (YC W10) and Skribit. Follow him on his blog, PaulStamatiou.com, and on Twitter: @Stammy. Reminisce with me for a bit.

MJM as Personified Evil Says Spyware Saves Lives Not Kills Them In the secretive world of surveillance technology, he goes just by his initials: MJM. His mystique is such that other security professionals avoid using wireless Internet near him. MJM himself suggests that those he meets allay their paranoia by taking batteries out of their mobile phones.

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