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A 19th-Century Vision of the Year 2000

A 19th-Century Vision of the Year 2000
In this section of the site we bring you curated collections of images, books, audio and film, shining a light on curiosities and wonders from a wide range of online archives. With a leaning toward the surprising, the strange, and the beautiful, we hope to provide an ever-growing cabinet of curiosities for the digital age, a kind of hyperlinked Wunderkammer – an archive of materials which truly celebrates the breadth and variety of our shared cultural commons and the minds that have made it. Some of our most popular posts include visions of the future from late 19th century France, a dictionary of Victorian slang and a film showing the very talented “hand-farting” farmer of Michigan. With each post including links back to the original source we encourage you to explore these wonderful online sources for yourself. Check out our Sources page to see where we find the content. Related:  Coolothèquehistoria

¿Te parece racista esta foto publicitaria de Gap? - BBC Mundo Image copyright GapKids ¿Qué ves en esta fotografía? ¿Cuatro amiguitas posando juguetonamente frente a la cámara? ¿Otra poco memorable campaña de mercadeo?, ¿o un patente ejemplo del tipo de racismo latente que persiste en el mundo corporativo de Estados Unidos? Ese es el debate que se ha desatado en las redes sociales en respuesta a la publicidad de una nueva línea de ropa; una colaboración entre la empresa Gap y la cómica y presentadora de televisión Ellen DeGeneres. La propaganda gráfica ha provocado una crítica tan punzante que la compañía de ropa ha pedido disculpas y anunció que retiraría la imagen de su campaña. Perú: la polémica sobre racismo que obligó a la tienda Falabella a retirar su campaña navideña La niña blanca alta con su brazo recostado sobre la cabeza de una niña negra de menor estatura es lo que ha encendido la polémica. Para algunos ha resultado por lo menos insultante, si no intencionalmente racista, y dicen refleja la falta de consideración por parte de Gap.

Googly Eyes Foundation Ah yes, eyebombing, the street art equivalent of drawing a funny mustache on Mona Lisa. So ubiquitous it’s impossible to credit anyone for inventing it… and yet for some reason it never quite stops being hilarious? Or maybe it’s just me. Probably just me. Update: Did you know there’s a Googly Eyes Foundation? Abraham Lincoln's letter to his son's teacher He will have to learn, I know, that all men are not just,all men are not true.But teach him also that for every scoundrel there is a hero;that for every selfish Politician, there is a dedicated leader...Teach him for every enemy there is a friend, Steer him away from envy,if you can,teach him the secret ofquiet laughter. Let him learn early that the bullies are the easiest to lick... Teach him, if you can,the wonder of books... But also give him quiet time to ponder the eternal mystery of birds in the sky,bees in the sun, and the flowers on a green hillside. In the school teach him it is far honourable to fail than to cheat... Try to give my son the strength not to follow the crowd when everyone is getting on the band wagon... Teach him if you can, how to laugh when he is sad...Teach him there is no shame in tears, Teach him to scoff at cynics and to beware of too much sweetness... Teach him to close his ears to a howling mob and to stand and fight if he thinks he's right.

How French Artists In 1899 Envisioned Life In The Year 2000 It’s always thought provoking when you come across artwork that was created years ago, whether it be by a few decades or a few thousand years. Art, in all its many forms, can tell us so much about the thoughts, feelings, history, and ideology which dominated the time period in which it was created. I came across a series of futuristic pictures (at publicdomainreview.org) created by Jean-March Cote and various other artists in 1899, 1900, 1901, and 1910. They were originally in the form of postcards or paper cards enclosed in cigarette boxes. These pictures were created in a time well before the introduction of high tech machinery, the industrial revolution, or flying contraptions. 100 years has flown by at a rapid pace, and our exponential technological development in all areas seems to have been missing an appropriate level of consciousness to go with it. What would you paint? Having Trouble Losing Excess Weight? Having trouble losing excess weight?

La tribu amazónica que no tiene palabras para los números - BBC Mundo Derechos de autor de la imagen Edward Gibson Imagina vivir en una sociedad sin palabras para los números, donde el "uno", "dos" o "tres"... no existan. Así viven los piraha, una tribu seminómada que habita a lo largo del río Maici en Brasil, y cuya lengua carece de palabras para contar. "Están tan alejados de la sociedad moderna industrializada como uno pueda imaginar", explica Daniel Everett, un investigador de la universidad de Bentley de Massachusetts, quien primero vivió con los piraha como misionero y después como investigador. Durante su convivencia con esta tribu, Everett desarrolló un interés especial por los números o, mejor dicho, la ausencia de ellos. Antes científicos pensaban que los piraha tenían "uno", "dos" y "muchos", algo que no es inusual en este tipo de lenguas. Pero en la medida que Daniel Everett empezó a investigar de una forma más sistemática, se dio cuenta que estos individuos sencillamente no sacan cuentas precisas. Cuando "uno" y "dos" no son 1 y 2

Une barrière invisible en miroirs Alyson Shotz a créée cette barrière composée de miroirs qui semblent la rendre invisible. Download 67,000 Historic Maps (in High Resolution) from the Wonderful David Rumsey Map Collection Stanford University’s been in the news lately, what with expanding its tuition waiver last year and now facing renewed scrutiny over its ultra-low admissions rate. These stories have perhaps overshadowed other Stanford news of a more academic nature: the arrival of the David Rumsey Map Center, which celebrated its grand opening yesterday and continues the festivities today and tomorrow. While these kinds of university improvements are rarely of much interest to the general public, this one highlights a collection worth giving full attention. Well, for those of us, that is, who love maps. You do not need to be a Stanford student or faculty or staff member to access the vast treasures of the Rumsey Map collection, nor do you need to visit the university or its new Center. In the case of “Twelve Perspectives on the Earth in Orbit and Rotation,” the georeferencing function returns an error message stating “this is not a map.” Get to browsing… and georeferencing…. Related Content:

Gynecological Gymnastics from Outer Space (1895) In this section of the site we bring you curated collections of images, books, audio and film, shining a light on curiosities and wonders from a wide range of online archives. With a leaning toward the surprising, the strange, and the beautiful, we hope to provide an ever-growing cabinet of curiosities for the digital age, a kind of hyperlinked Wunderkammer – an archive of materials which truly celebrates the breadth and variety of our shared cultural commons and the minds that have made it. Some of our most popular posts include visions of the future from late 19th century France, a dictionary of Victorian slang and a film showing the very talented “hand-farting” farmer of Michigan. With each post including links back to the original source we encourage you to explore these wonderful online sources for yourself. Check out our Sources page to see where we find the content.

Heider-Simmel: Is there a story? | TRBQ Back in the 1940s, psychologists Fritz Heider and Marianne Simmel made a simple animated film. Heider and Simmel used it in an experiment: They asked people to watch the film and describe what they saw happening. Try it out yourself. Here’s the Heider-Simmel film. What Heider and Simmel discovered is that many people who watched this abstract film of simple shapes roaming around were quick to see a story unfold. Our impulse to tell stories is one of the questions we’re investigating in our radio hour on story. The film still makes people see stories More recently, the Institute for Creative Technologies at USC showed the Heider-Simmel film to seven comedians and asked them to narrate the action. Help a computer tell a story Imposing a story on the Heider-Simmel film seems to come easy to humans. “The truth is, it’s super, super hard for computers,” Andrew Gordon, a computer scientist at USC, told us. Gordon wants to get computers to be able to tell stories like people do.

Il insère les personnages des Simpson dans ses photos du quotidien Le français François Dourlen s’amuse à créer des illusions avec son smartphone. Et quand il s’attaque aux personnages des Simpson on peut dire que c’est très créatif ! Les Photos de François sont un beau petit phénomène sur internet. Pour retrouver plus de photos de François Dourlen, vous pouvez suivre son Instagram et sa page Facebook. Imaginé parFrançois DourlenSourceinstagram.com

The History of Europe: 5,000 Years Animated in a Timelapse Map If you’re an Open Culture old timer, you know the work of EmperorTigerstar–a Youtuber who specializes (to quote myself) “in documenting the unfolding of world historical events by stitching together hundreds of maps into timelapse films”. We’ve previously featured his “map animations” of the U.S. Civil War (1861-1865), World War I (1914-1918), and World War II (1939-1945) and also the History of Rome. This week, the map animator released The History of Europe: Every Year. Follow Open Culture on Facebook and Twitter and share intelligent media with your friends. If you’d like to support Open Culture and our mission, please consider making a donation to our site. Related Content: The Rise & Fall of the Romans: Every Year Shown in a Timelapse Map Animation (753 BC -1479 AD) Animated Map Lets You Watch the Unfolding of Every Day of the U.S. Watch World War I Unfold in a 6 Minute Time-Lapse Film: Every Day From 1914 to 1918

Have You Been Throwing Away The Healthiest Part Of Your Avocado? Avocados are probably one of the greatest foods of all time, and not just because they taste so darn good! They are also extremely beneficial to your health and remarkably versatile in the kitchen. Offering a very wide array of medicinal properties, they are loaded with healthy fats, lutein, vitamin K, and folate, among many other vitamins and nutrients. But did you realize that you might be getting rid of the most beneficial part of the avocado every time you eat one? No, it’s not the skin… it’s the seed! Avocado seeds actually make up around 70% of the avocado’s nutritional benefits. Other Benefits Of The Avocado Seed According to the Encyclopedia of Common Naturals Used In Foods, Drugs and Cosmetics, tests conducted on rats and mice have shown that avocado seeds have anti-tumor properties, due to a condensed flavonol found only in the seeds. Avocado seeds are also loaded with soluble fibre. Ways To Eat An Avocado Seed Many Other Uses To think we’ve been throwing these out all this time!

El lenguaje transforma nuestra percepción del mundo “Los límites de mi lenguaje son los límites de mi mundo”, escribía en 1921 Ludwig Wittgenstein,en un tratado en el que intentó definir la lógica fundamental del pensamiento humano. Y al parecer el soberbio filósofo austriaco tenía razón. Una serie de estudios encabezados por la guapa investigadora de ciencias neurocognitivas de Stanford y MIT, Lera Boroditsky, parecen confirmar científicamente esta intuición profunda de la historia del pensamiento humano. De rígida formación científica aunque abocada a campos humanitarios, Lera se llevó una estremecedora sorpresa después de asimilar sus resultados investigando la percepción del tiempo, las formas y los colores en sujetos que habitan diferentes lenguajes. “Mi intención era mostrar que el lenguaje no afecta la percepción, pero encontré exactamente lo opuesto. “En ruso no existe una sola palabra que cubra todos los colores que las personas que hablan inglés llaman “azul”. Twitter del autor: @alepholo “if the world is code, then it can be or

This Dad Creates Impressive, Heartwarming Toast Sculptures for His Daughters' Breakfast Some sculptors make art out of bronze, some make art out of marble, and some make art out of a couple slices of toast bread. Adam Perry, the artist behind Instagram sensation 2slicesoftoast, creates a different toast sculpture for his daughters every day. Because of Perry's younger daughter's severe food allergies, toast with sunflower oil spread is one of very few breakfast option. So, to keep her breakfast exciting, he started turning breakfast into a chance to make art. © 2Slicesoftoast / Instagram Perry makes these sculptures in the time it takes the kettle to boil each morning (which makes sense, since Perry's family lives just outside London). Related: THESE FOOD SMASHING GIFS ARE THE MOST SATISFYING ANIMATIONS YOU'LL SEE ALL DAY Oddly enough, when Adam Perry's not making heartwarming toast sculptures for his daughters, he's drumming for the band the Bloodhound Gang.

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