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Flickr cc attribution bookmarklet maker

Flickr cc attribution bookmarklet maker
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Ebook Course for Teachers free! Mission In 5 weeks (Jan. 11th - Feb. 14th, 2016), collaborate with over 500 teachers worldwide to design the 1st chapter of a digital textbook that meets your students' needs. Receive support from 18 moderators with experience in publishing, editing, and materials design. **REGISTER for this Session: 1. 2. 3. 4. We are thankful for the support of our sponsor CALL-IS! While you wait, complete our pre-tasks to learn more about Google Communities and ebook design! A pbworks wiki which has not been edited in the last 12 months is reclaimed by pbworks

Open Content Program (The Getty) The Getty makes available, without charge, all available digital images to which the Getty holds the rights or that are in the public domain to be used for any purpose. No permission is required. For additional information please see the related press releases, as well as overviews of each phase of the program on The Getty Iris. Why Open Content? The Getty adopted the Open Content Program because we recognized the need to share images of works of art for free and without restriction, so that all those who create or appreciate art—scholars, artists, art lovers, and entrepreneurs—will have greater access to high-quality digital images for their studies and projects. What's in Open Content? Access to Open Content Images All of the images can be found on Getty Search Gateway, and the J. Open content images are identified with a "Download" link. If you need new photography, resizing, or color correction, you can request these services by contacting Museum Rights & Reproductions (for J.

12 Must Have Resources for Free Public Domain Pictures to Use in Class January 23, 2014 Images speak louder than words. We all have recourse to images as visual aids in our teaching but the search for such images is not always an easy one. Most often, you spend a decent amount of time looking for pictures only to be disappointed that they are copyrighted . This is where the importance of having a ready made list of public domain image sources comes in handy. I have gone through some of the resources I have reviewed before and compiled the list below. Pics4Learning is an open project where anyone ( particularly photographers ) can join in and add their photos. 2- National Gallery of Art For those of you looking for free downloadable and re-usable images of art, the National Gallery of Art has more than 25.000 art images to offer you. 3- British Library The British Library has recently released over a million images onto Flickr Commons for anyone to use, remix and repurpose. 4- Wikipaintings 5- Public Domain Pictures 7- Pixabay 8- Public Domain photos 10 - Flickr

Sarah McIntyre - 25 tips for hosting an awesome author visit! Getting an author to visit your school, library or festival is a brilliant way to inspire kids to read and fire up their creativity. I find a lot of kids don’t really understand that the name on a book cover is a real person. (It’s not some sort of box with a button that you push, and out comes a book.) And when they can see right in front of them that a writer or illustrator is a person who walks and talks and laughs and gets excited about stories, and occasionally makes mistakes, they get an inkling of possibilities: Hey, maybe this is something I could do, too! It’s so much more exciting to read a book by someone they’ve met. During the past few years, I’ve picked up a few things that could be helpful if you’re thinking of organising your own Author Visit. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. Using a visualiser 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. Here are some examples of follow-up activities by Portway Junior School (see more here!) 25.

PDClipart.org - Public Domain Clip Art Free ebook design course Pixabay - Public Domain Images World Digital Library Home 20 Ways Libraries Are Using Pinterest Right Now Pinterest is taking the social media world by storm, and it isn’t just popular with individual users. Businesses, nonprofits, and even libraries are sharing ideas and information through the site as well, connecting with people from around the country and around the globe. Whether you’re a librarian, student, teacher, or just an avowed bibliophile, Pinterest offers another great way to keep up with creative and cutting-edge ways libraries are engaging with their communities. Pinning book covers.

23 Tools and Resources to Create Images for Social Media Update – we launched Pablo a new tool to create beautiful images for your social media posts in under 30 seconds You can use Pablo right from the get-go, no need to login or create an account. Just quickly create amazing images super fast. You can try out the first version of Pablo right now – no login required. Just head to and give it a try! We’d love to hear your thoughts about Pablo on Twitter, just hit us up @buffer and hope it makes creating images for your social media posts much easier for you. Ok, back to the blogpost! Through experimentation and iteration, we’ve found that including images when sharing to social media increases engagement across the board—more clicks, reshares, replies, and favorites. Using images in social media posts is well worth trying with your profiles. As a small business owner or a one-person marketing team, is this something you can pull off by yourself? Got a favorite image creation tool? 1. 2. Additional screen capture tools: 3.

Chat for Creating Digital Textbooks Free icons! License: Free for commercial use License: Free for commercial use (Include link to authors website) License: Free for non commercial use License: Free for personal use only License: Free for commercial use (Do not redistribute) License: Free for personal use only (Buy licence) License: Free for commercial use (Attribute author as specified in license)

The Ultimate Directory Of Free Image Sources So, you need an image for your blog? We’ve spent some time categorizing our favorite sources for free images and organizing them in such a way as to help you find what you’re looking for. Here are the criteria we’ve examined: Subjects: Does a site focus on specific genres of images, or is it a mass collection of various image types? High Resolution: Lots of great image resources emerged in the pre-Web 2.0 phase, but it wasn’t until bandwidth dramatically increased that allowed for the uploading of much higher resolution images suitable for editing and printing. License: The licenses vary extremely from source to source. Safety: Government sites and many specific subject collections are extremely safe for students to use. Search Engines While these websites do not actually contribute image content themselves, they’re able to index images in a way that makes it easier to search for free content. Category Favorite: Bing Images Bing Images Compfight Creative Commons Search Everystockphoto HiveStock

Teachers sharing resources online This unit is designed to help you learn about how learning resources can be shared using online repositories, i.e. websites that allow for the uploading of electronic materials that can then be used and adapted by others. The unit comes about through collaboration between The Open University and TSL Education Ltd, the company behind one of the leading examples of such websites – TES Connect 28 [Tip: hold Ctrl and click a link to open it in a new tab. (Hide tip29)] . While the unit draws its examples and activities from this site its principles are designed so that they may be applied to others. The unit is organised in five sections: an overview, sections on finding and selecting resources, evaluating and adapting them, sharing your own resources and, finally, a conclusion with a quiz. If you are a teaching or classroom assistant you might like to consider taking our Foundation Degree in Primary Teaching and Learning30.

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