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Buddha's World & Buddhism

Buddha's World & Buddhism
Hi Stumblers! Please see my spiritual newsletter My focus is not on rituals, symbolism or gods, but on the path that Buddhism points to and its vision on the nature of our every day "reality". Of living teachers of Buddhism, material by Thich Nhat Hanh,the Dalai Lama has been included here, among many others. Katinka Hesselink Related:  BuddhismBuddhism and Buddhist schoolslilipilyspirit

Letting Go of Attachment, from A to Zen | zen habits “Most of our troubles are due to our passionate desire for and attachment to things that we misapprehend as enduring entities.” ~Dalai Lama Editor’s note: This is a guest post from Lori Deschene of Tiny Buddha. If there’s one thing we all have in common it’s that we want to feel happy; and on the other side of that coin, we want to avoid hurting. Yet we consistently put ourselves in situations that set us up for pain. We pin our happiness to people, circumstances, and things and hold onto them for dear life. We attach to feelings as if they define us, and ironically, not just positive ones. In trying to hold on to what’s familiar, we limit our ability to experience joy in the present. When you stop trying to grasp, own, and control the world around you, you give it the freedom to fulfill you without the power to destroy you. It’s no simple undertaking to let go of attachment—not a one-time decision, like pulling off a band-aid. Experiencing Without Attachment Believe now is enough.

Buddhist Geeks - Download free podcast episodes by Personal Life Media on iTunes. Bodhisattva Quotes | We live in a world where we have to hide to make... Bodhisattva Quotes "At night I dream that you and I are two plants that grew together, roots entwined and that you know..." follow me → Newer Older <div id="about_container" style="display:block;border-top: 1px #000000 dashed;"><a name="me"></a><p class="avatar"><img alt="Bodhisattva Quotes"src=" /></p><p><script type="text/javascript"> var gaJsHost = (("https:" == document.location.protocol) ? Field Notes Theme.

How to Transcend Ego in Meditation "If you practice being present in meditation,you will find even beyond the thinkingthat there is this reflexive urgeto separate yourself from this moment. It is almost like two magnetsthat repel each other with all of their strength. This is the ego. You could even define the egoas the action of separationfrom this moment. Because if you are fully presentin this moment,there is no ego. There is no senseof "me." There is still awarenessbut all inclusive awareness. There is nothing separate from it. You can experience thisat any time. Try this now. Close your eyesand let yourselffully relax into this moment. To fully immerse yourselfin what is here and now beyond the mindwithout commentary,without definitions or descriptions,without using the mind at all. To let go into this momentto where there is only attention left. If I was to try to put it into wordsI would say that you feel this momentas subtle sensation,but you go even deeper than that. There can be no mind involved,that is the tricky part. Kip"

BEGINNER'S GUIDE ... © 1995 Dharman Craig PressonAll Rights Reserved “Zen is not what you think!” -- anonymous Preface The purpose of this little book is to assure that all studentsunderstand the mechanics of Zen practice and the basic teachings ofBuddhism. The descriptions of practices have been generalized, andparticular schools have adopted variations. Part 1: Practice Sitting, Breathing, Walking Seated meditation (J. zazen, Ch. The Sitting Posture (asana) There are several good postures for zazen: four cross-legged, onekneeling, and one using a straight chair or camp stool, as illustrated[Add illustrations of full lotus, half-lotus, sukhasana, Burmese, seiza,and chair sitting]. Breathing One may be given specific instructions by a teacher regarding theproper focus of awareness during zazen. Do not force or control the breath in any way. Walking (Kinhin) Part 2: Theory The Buddha The Dharma The Four Noble Truths 1. 2. 3. This Truth is the basis of the Buddhist system. 4. The Eightfold Noble Path 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Buddhist meditation Buddhist meditation refers to the meditative practices associated with the religion and philosophy of Buddhism. Core meditation techniques have been preserved in ancient Buddhist texts and have proliferated and diversified through teacher-student transmissions. Buddhists pursue meditation as part of the path toward Enlightenment and Nirvana.[a] The closest words for meditation in the classical languages of Buddhism are bhāvanā[b] and jhāna/dhyāna. Key Terms[edit] Meditation in Buddhist traditions[edit] While there are some similar meditative practices — such as breath meditation and various recollections (anussati) — that are used across Buddhist schools, there is also significant diversity. In early tradition[edit] Types of meditation[edit] Meditation on the Buddhist Path Most Buddhist traditions recognize that the path to Enlightenment entails three types of training: virtue (sīla); meditation (samadhi); and, wisdom (paññā). And implicitly in regard to : Four foundations for mindfulness[edit]

67 Not Out: 21 Questions Of Life Answered By The Buddha The following questions and answers are taken from the 1894 book about Buddhism called The Gospel of Buddha. This is a compilation from ancient records by Paul Carus. On a certain day when the Blessed One dwelt at Jetavana, the garden of Anathapindika, a celestial deva came to him in the shape of a Brahman whose countenance was bright and whose garments were white like snow. The deva asked:What is the sharpest sword? The Blessed One replied:The sharpest sword is a word spoken in wrath;the deadliest poison is covetousness;the fiercest fire is hatred;the darkest night is ignorance. The deva asked:What is the greatest gain? The Blessed One replied:The greatest gain is to give to others;the greatest loss is to greedily receive without gratitude;an invulnerable armor is patience;the best weapon is wisdom. The deva asked:Who is the most dangerous thief? The deva asked:What is attraction? The deva asked:What causes ruin in the world? The Blessed One replied:Blessing!

Buddhism Vaults : Dalai Lama's Heart Sutra Talk, May 2001, SF Bay Area, California, Day 1 of 3. by Dave Evans Day 2Day 3 Introduction Today I was fortunate enough to sneak out of work for a few hours to hear His Holiness the Dalai Lama began a lecture on the Heart Sutra. This is a three day class and I'm going to sneak out of some work tomorrow and Attend Saturday during the day as well. I thought I'd share some of what he said (as interpreted through my notes) with everyone. Please forgive my spelling, my crutch... er, spell checker is not working currently. Tickets for the three day class were $150. His Holiness started this morning talking about the diversity of religions and then even the diversity of views within buddhism. I want to point out that these are just my notes of H.H.' I missed some of the afternoon session, couldn't sneak out of work for the whole thing, but I'll summarize as much detail as I have. The shoreline stage was decorated with a large backdrop picture of the palace in Lhasa, with a small decorated throne like chair in front for the fourteenth Dalai Lama to sit on.

Dharma The Cat Cartoons “Dharma The Cat – Philosophy With Fur” Features clever, thought-provoking cartoonsthat appeal to all ages, blendingphilosophy and spirituality with humor. DHARMA THE CAT SAYS: "Sometimes when you thinkyou're teaching others, they're teaching you!" “It's havoc, farce and mayhem on the rocky path to nirvana,with a Buddhist cat, a novice monk and a mouse hell-bent on cheese!” DHARMA THE CAT SAYS: "Comparisons are odious!" These cartoons have been published in magazines in 28 countries,and translated into 18 languages. DHARMA THE CAT SAYS: "Some things are better left unsaid!" click here to preview the eBook(right click on link, then "save target as")orBuy Dharma's Cartoon e-Book for US$15! Check the great gifts at Dharma's store! A paperback copy book of these cartoons was published (in black & white) by Simon & Schuster Australia, and is still available from www.Amazon.com. Now all the old favorites are in this e-Book in full color, with some new cartoons never seen before.

art of dharma. | A Buddhist Blog on Dharma, Compassion, Meditation, Yoga, Vegetarian, and more.. Essentials of Buddhism - core concepts free buddhist audio : free mp3s and texts on buddhism, meditation and the arts

This is quite true,andthis diversity in belief is a large part of what I was earlier reffering to.We as a species are allys growing,allways evolving,to what as yet,I haven't a clue I think,IMHO that to any one seeking out the things that are beyond the physical realm,the mindfuness meditation comes to them in one form,or another.I don't know what your experience has been in spiritual matters,but it has been my experience that if you want ''Spiritual'' experiences,they happen to you sometimes in some profound ways.And you're welcome by ixgagbalamvucub Apr 2

and thank you for this link. The Mindfulness Meditation is what I have practiced for years without much awareness of it, at least until recently I've realized and have been empowered by it. by rossbusby Apr 2

I attune to the Tao as the basis of my beliefs. Following your own Path leads you in directions that is beneficial to you, speaking to you in terms and iconographies that are related to your personal being and often societal contexts. Often religious figures are presented to us in a personal and enlightening way becase we are only able to understand the present moment in terms of what our surroundings are.
Your Tao is not my Tao, my Path is not your Path, yet we still can acknowledge we are both on the Tao/Path. by rossbusby Apr 2

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