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Teachers’ Most Powerful Role? Adding Context

Teachers’ Most Powerful Role? Adding Context
Lenny Gonzalez Part 3 in the series Learning In the New Economy of Information. By Shawn McCusker During a recent unit on World War II, Courtney Wilhelm’s U.S. History class conducted a leader’s conference. In classes where students connect ideas from the abstract to real-life events, the role of the teacher — as Wilhelm illustrates — moves from being a distributor of information to one of nurturing students as they collect, evaluate, and process information into unique learning products. For some, these changing roles might signal the end of an era where the teacher serves as a content expert. It’s here, in these seemingly disjointed moments, that the expertise of the teacher is crucial to uniting the class’s learning. In reality, however, the converse is true. And it’s here, in these seemingly disjointed moments, that the expertise of the teacher is crucial to uniting the class’s learning. Teacher as Conductor in the Classroom Orchestra Related Related:  Project Based LearningENGL

Project-Based Learning and the Common Core: Resource Roundup Alignment of PBL and the Common Core Project-Based Learning and the Common Core (ASCD, 2012) This webinar from ASCD and Edutopia blogger Andrew Miller is an introduction to how PBL can not only align to specific Common Core State Standards, but also support CCSS implementation. Sample projects and tips are included. Back to Top PBL and the Common Core in the Classroom Common Core and PBL in the Classroom <img class="media-image media-element file-content-image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/content_image_breakpoints_theme_edutopia_desktop_1x/public/content/73/video.gif? ELA- and Math-Specific Guidance Literacy Design Collaborative and PBL <img class="media-image media-element file-content-image" src="/sites/default/files/styles/content_image_breakpoints_theme_edutopia_desktop_1x/public/content/73/video.gif? Related Resources Do you know of additional resources, or are there other types of resources you'd like to see included?

What’s Lost as Handwriting Fades Does handwriting matter? Not very much, according to many educators. The Common Core standards, which have been adopted in most states, call for teaching legible writing, but only in kindergarten and first grade. After that, the emphasis quickly shifts to proficiency on the keyboard. But psychologists and neuroscientists say it is far too soon to declare handwriting a relic of the past. Children not only learn to read more quickly when they first learn to write by hand, but they also remain better able to generate ideas and retain information. “When we write, a unique neural circuit is automatically activated,” said Stanislas Dehaene, a psychologist at the Collège de France in Paris. “And it seems that this circuit is contributing in unique ways we didn’t realize,” he continued. A 2012 study led by Karin James, a psychologist at Indiana University, lent support to that view. The researchers found that the initial duplication process mattered a great deal. Dr. In another study, Dr. Dr.

Educational Leadership:Giving Students Meaningful Work:Seven Essentials for Project-Based Learning September 2010 | Volume 68 | Number 1 Giving Students Meaningful Work Pages 34-37 John Larmer and John R. Mergendoller As Ms. Sound familiar? What Every Good Project Needs A project is meaningful if it fulfills two criteria. As educators with the Buck Institute for Education, we provide professional development to help schools set up a sustained program of in-depth project-based learning throughout a district, network, or state. 1. Imagine that on the first day of the infectious disease unit, Ms. Teachers can powerfully activate students' need to know content by launching a project with an "entry event" that engages interest and initiates questioning. Many students find schoolwork meaningless because they don't perceive a need to know what they're being taught. 2. After the discussion about beach pollution, Ms. A good driving question captures the heart of the project in clear, compelling language, which gives students a sense of purpose and challenge. 3. 4. 21st Century Skills Once Ms.

technology What is PBL? To help teachers do PBL well, we created a comprehensive, research-based model for PBL — a "gold standard" to help teachers, schools, and organizations to measure, calibrate, and improve their practice. In Gold Standard PBL, projects are focused on student learning goals and include Essential Project Design Elements: iGeneration Five Keys to Rigorous Project-Based Learning Voiceover: How will today’s children function in a dangerous world? What means will they use to carve the future? Will they be equipped to find the answers to tomorrow’s problems? Teacher: When you think about traditional learning you think of a student sitting in a classroom and being talked at. Teacher: Now I imagine a lot of you are still thinking... Teacher: They are supposed to be a sponge. Peggy Ertmer: So there are a lot of different ways to approach PBL, a lot of different ways to implement it, but really it all boils down to five essential keys: real-world connection, core to learning, structured collaboration, student driven, and multifaceted assessment. Student: One of the problems in the ocean is that with the higher amount of CO2 calcifying organisms are decreasing and we’re testing to see how well life in the ocean lives without calcifying organisms. Student: --four by eight feet. Peggy Ertmer: So the second commonality is the PBL unit provides academic rigor. Student: Yes.

Learning to love the iGeneration | Claude Lord ECIS TECH CONFERENCE 2013, 14 - 16 March Hosted by ACS Cobham International, London, England Learning to love the iGeneration... and... embrace the irresistible IT vision of tomorrow’s classroom.... A confronting double edged conference's title that implies a generation divide wider than any preceding ones, in a new context of volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity and an urgency that can no longer be ignored: The paradoxical co-existence of “Education 1.0” in “Society 3.0” Who is the iGeneration? A generation fully at ease with fast changes, “born to be wired” whose first digital footprints date back in time of a fetus in the womb, for whom "WWW doesn't stand for World Wide Web but Whatever, Whenever, Wherever, and for whom, a phone is not a phone but a portable computer to tweet, surf the web, and, of course, text, text, text". A mobile generation, no mouse, no desktop, no landlines, who chats rather than email. “It is not about bringing IT into the classroom.

How to Reinvent Project Based Learning to Be More Meaningful | PROJECT BASED LEARNING By Thom Markham This is a crucial time for education. Every system in every country is in the process of figuring out how to reboot education to teach skills, application, and attitude in addition to recall and understanding. Helping students be able to grapple with increased problem solving and inquiry, be better critical and creative thinkers, show greater independence and engagement, and exhibit skills as presenters and collaborators is the challenge of the moment. That’s why so many educators are using the project based learning (PBL) model. PBL has proven to be a means for setting up the kind of problem-solving challenges that engage students in deeper learning and critical inquiry. However, it’s also time to reboot PBL. If PBL is to become a powerful, accepted model of instruction in the future, a vocabulary change may be in order — preferably to the term project based inquiry. 1. First, think skills. Think strategically. Use PBL for entrepreneurial inquiry. 2. Let go of theory.

Marina Gorbis: The Future Of Education Eliminates The Classroom, Because The World Is Your Class — Provided You Have a Hand-Held Device Massive Open Online Courses might seem like best way to use the Internet to open up education, but you’re thinking too small. Technology can turn our entire lives into learning experiences. This probably sounds familiar: You are with a group of friends arguing about some piece of trivia or historical fact. Someone says, “Wait, let me look this up on Wikipedia,” and proceeds to read the information out loud to the whole group, thus resolving the argument. Don’t dismiss this as a trivial occasion. Socialstructed learning is an aggregation of microlearning experiences drawn from a rich ecology of content and driven not by grades but by social and intrinsic rewards. Think of a simple augmented reality app on your iPhone such as Yelp Monocle . This is exactly what a project from USC and UCLA called HyperCities is doing: layering historical information on the actual city terrain. So look beyond MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) in thinking about the future education. See Also:

What It Takes to Become an All Project-Based School | PROJECT BASED LEARNING In many schools, project-based learning happens in isolated cases: in certain teachers’ classrooms here and there, or in the contexts of specific subjects. But for students to benefit from project-based learning, ideally it’s part of a school’s infrastructure — a way to approach learning holistically. For one quickly growing network of schools, project-based learning is the crux of the entire ecosystem. New Tech Network, which was founded 15 years ago, is taking its school-wide project-based model to national scale. The organization, which offers a paid program for schools to use its model, began with a flagship school in Napa and has grown to 120 schools in 18 states, most of which are public schools. The network has not only grown in size, but also in notoriety. The nod from the president comes at a time when New Tech is attempting to position itself as a successful model to follow. New Tech schools are entirely project-based and cross-disciplinary. New Tech’s model is not cheap.

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