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A Great Poster on The 6 Questions Critical Thinker Asks

A Great Poster on The 6 Questions Critical Thinker Asks
April 6, 2014 In an earlier post here in Educational Technology and Mobile Learning I talked about the 8 elements of the critical thinking process and I argued that critical thinking is a cognitive process that requires disruptive patterns of thinking, ones that question the status quo of propositions and leads to the creation of alternative lines of reasoning. Today I am adding to this discussion this beautiful visual created by Learningcommons which features the 6 questions a critical thinker asks. This could be used as a poster in your classroom to remind students of the kind of questions they need to ponder about and develop. Have a look and share with your colleagues. For more resources, toolkits, sheets and other materials on critical thinking, visit this page.

http://www.educatorstechnology.com/2014/04/a-great-poster-on-6-questions-critical.html

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25 Question Stems Framed Around Bloom's Taxonomy 25 Question Stems Framed Around Bloom’s Taxonomy While critical thinking is a foundation rather than a brick, how you build that foundation depends on the learning process itself: exposing students to new thinking and promoting interaction with that thinking in a gradual release of responsibility approach. Question stems can be a powerful part of that process no matter where the learner is. Assessment (pre-assessment, self-assessment, formative and summative assessment), prompting and cueing during discussion, etc. In that light, the following 25+ question stems framed around the early, non-revised Bloom’s Taxonomy are worth a gander.

Writing Discursive compositions (Secondary level) (Part 5): Introduction of Discursive essay (use of case studies) This is my fifth post on discursive writing. For my first post, please click here. Having discussed the technique of historical development and cause and effect, let’s take a look at writing the introduction using a case study or case studies. The Physics Of Productivity: Newton’s Laws Of Getting Stuff Done In 1687, Sir Isaac Newton published his groundbreaking book, Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy, which described his three laws of motion. In the process, Newton laid the foundation for classical mechanics and redefined the way the world looked at physics and science. What most people don’t know, however, is that Newton’s three laws of motion can be used as an interesting analogy for increasing your productivity, simplifying your work, and improving your life. Allow me to present this analogy as Newton’s Laws of Productivity.

To Teach Effective Writing, Model Effective Writing I strive to teach my high school students the value of criticism, especially when it comes to improving their writing. To do so, I model how criticism continues to help me become a better writer. Earlier this year, for example, I shared a draft of one of my education feature articles, which included detailed feedback from an editor at a prominent media company. I asked my classes for advice on how to address several edits, dealing with sources, transitions, terminology, and structure. A few days later, I directed my budding writers to the much-improved final draft.

Effective Questioning Strategies Questioning Techniques Questioning is one of the most important dimensions of teaching and learning. It gives tutors the chance to find out what students know and understand, and it allows students to seek clarification and help. There are many types of questions. One dichotomy is the closed vs. open question types. 38 Question Starters based on Bloom’s Taxonomy - Curriculet Curriculet is free for teachers and students. Get started here. This is the 2nd post in a series on how to write better curriculets (and literacy curriculum). Our first post can be found here. In this blog post, Lindsey Howe shares some of the best practices she has developed as a teacher and curriculet writer. Lindsey is one of Curriculet’s first writers and she has taught high school English for 8 years.

Six Scaffolding Strategies to Use with Your Students What’s the opposite of scaffolding a lesson? Saying to students, “Read this nine-page science article, write a detailed essay on the topic it explores, and turn it in by Wednesday.” Yikes—no safety net, no parachute, no scaffolding—they’re just left blowing in the wind. Let’s start by agreeing that scaffolding a lesson and differentiating instruction are two different things. Scaffolding is breaking up the learning into chunks and then providing a tool, or structure, with each chunk.

How To Stop Being Lazy And Get More Done - 5 Expert Tips Some days the to-do list seems bottomless. Just looking at it is exhausting. We all want to know how to stop being lazy and get more done. I certainly want the answer. 50 Ways To Challenge Yourself As A Teacher 50 Ways To Challenge Yourself As Teacher by TeachThought Staff Growing as a teacher is all about challenging yourself–moving out of our comfort zone, trying something new. Here are 50 ideas to consider. How Questions Promote Cognitive, Social, and Emotional Learning Across Subject Areas In the last blog, we took a look at the perspective of perspective of Irving Sigel on the importance of asking different kinds of questions as a way of deepening students' social, emotional, and cognitive learning. Coming from a Piaget approach, Irv felt that students needed to go from understanding the material as presented to generating their own thoughts about it. He referred to this as "distancing" -- not the clearest term, but a way of saying that questions could be sequenced toward leading to students' higher order and constructivist thinking by having them take a range of perspectives about a given reading or topic. Continuing with our example using the children's story, "Goldilocks and the Three Bears," you can see below the wide range of questions that can help children think of even a simple story in ways that promote many different kinds and levels of thinking: Low Level Distancing

The Question Game: A Playful Way To Teach Critical Thinking The Question Game by Sophie Wrobel, geist.avesophos.de The Question Game: A Playful Way To Teach Critical Thinking Big idea: Teaching kids to ask smart questions on their own Top 10 Picture Books for the Secondary Classroom As a teacher of future English teachers, I am always trying to open my students’ eyes to the wonder and power of the picture book, both as an art form and as a terrific instructional tool for the secondary classroom. Being students of capital-L literature, my teacher-babies sometimes forget to consider these compact and powerful texts. It’s the best way I know to get numerous, diverse and COMPLETE texts into students’ minds.

The Duckworth Lab NEW! Measurement matters: Assessing personal qualities other than cognitive ability for educational purposes. If grit and self-control are so important, should schools and policymakers measure them? The answer to this simple question is a little complicated. See this article, co-authored with David Yeager for our perspective (pdf). (Please see these links as well for the press release and video created by the American Educational Research Association).

Questioning Toolkit Essential Questions These are questions which touch our hearts and souls. They are central to our lives.

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