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High Achiever, Gifted Learner, CreativeThinker

High Achiever, Gifted Learner, CreativeThinker
Identification of gifted students is clouded when concerned adults misinterpret high achievement as giftedness. High-achieving students are noticed for their on-time, neat, well-developed, and correct learning products. Adults comment on these students' consistent high grades and note how well they acclimate to class procedures and discussions. Some adults assume these students are gifted because their school-appropriate behaviors and products surface above the typical responses of grade-level students. Educators with expertise in gifted education are frustrated trying to help other educators and parents understand that while high achievers are valuable participants whose high-level modeling is welcomed in classes, they learn differently from gifted learners. In situations in which they are respected and encouraged, gifted students' thinking is more complex with abstract inferences and more diverse perceptions than is typical of high achievers. Szabos, J. (1989).

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7 Ways to Grow the Action Habit People at the top of every profession share one quality — they get things done . This ability supercedes intelligence, talent, and connections in determining the size of your salary and the speed of your advancement. Despite the simplicity of this concept there is a perpetual shortage of people who excel at getting results. The action habit — the habit of putting ideas into action now — is essential to getting things done. Here are 7 ways you can grow the action habit: 1. Are We Failing Gifted Students? By Cindy Long Meet C.J. Wilson. He’s a fourteen-year-old from Alexandria, Va., who likes video games, going to the movies and playing neighborhood football with his friends. Is It a Cheetah? By Stephanie S. Tolan © 1996 Stephanie S. Tolan 5 Ways to Be Known as a Visionary Would you like to be seen as a groundbreaker and a visionary? Want to be the Seth Godin of your field or the Malcolm Gladwell (possibly with a different hairstyle) of your industry? You can—but it’s not easy. And it takes a lot more than sitting at a computer while the children are nestled all snug in their beds and visions of thought leadership dance in your head. How do I know?

To Teach Gifted Learners Well THE DOS AND DON'TS OF INSTRUCTION:What It Means To Teach Gifted Learners Well by Carol Ann Tomlinson, Ed.D, The University of Virginia Some people suggest that gifted education is just sort of "fluffy" or enriching-gravy on the potatoes, perhaps, but not anything especially substantial or critical in the way of mental fare. Others propose that all gifted education is what's good for all students. What Are the Characteristics of Effective Teachers of the Gifted? Knowing the characteristics of the best teachers of gifted students would be helpful for a variety of reasons. Understanding these characteristics could help in the training of teachers, in hiring of teachers of the gifted, and in helping parents assess who might best serve their children. Although it would be helpful to understand the characteristics of the best teachers of gifted students, there does not appear to be a general consensus of what those characteristics are. There have, however, been a number of studies that attempt to synthesize this information. An interesting discussion question might be how the characteristics of a teacher of the gifted might differ from the characteristics of an exemplary teacher of any type of student. Based on questionnaire data and needing more thorough research, effective teachers of the gifted have the following characteristics:

5 Simple Ways to Increase Your Intelligence Your brain needs exercise just like a muscle. If you use it often and in the right ways, you will become a more skilled thinker and increase your ability to focus. But if you never use your brain, or abuse it with harmful chemicals, your ability to think and learn will deteriorate.

NRC/GT—Winter '98 Newsletter-Distinguishing Myths From Realities: NRC/GT Research Marcia Gentry Mankato State University Mankato, MN Karen Kettle Durham Board of Education Whitby, Ontario How well do you know the research findings of the NRC/GT? You May Be Able to Actually Make Yourself Smarter—All It Takes Is Practice I totally agree, but don't think that wikipedia-surfing is a good example, because you search for stuff that you want to know (or maybe easier to understand) while when reading a scrience book f.e. you have to read all the way through the article, even if some parts are harder to understand I tend to agree as well, but I've found that as someone who strives to learn almost to the exclusion of all else in my life, when that learning is severely depressed by any of a variety of factors, I'm encouraged to drink. Maybe dumb people don't 'not care,' but they're just not as capable of learning, and lack to means of acquiring the necessary facilitation to expand their minds. Or, maybe you're right and they don't care. I think, as the years go on, I've come to believe that intelligence levels and opportunities are a lot more situational than I'd once thought.

Getting It Wrong: Surprising Tips on How to Learn For years, many educators have championed “errorless learning," advising teachers (and students) to create study conditions that do not permit errors. For example, a classroom teacher might drill students repeatedly on the same multiplication problem, with very little delay between the first and second presentations of the problem, ensuring that the student gets the answer correct each time. The idea embedded in this approach is that if students make errors, they will learn the errors and be prevented (or slowed) in learning the correct information. But research by Nate Kornell, Matthew Hays and Robert Bjork at U.C.L.A. that recently appeared in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory and Cognition reveals that this worry is misplaced. In fact, they found, learning becomes better if conditions are arranged so that students make errors.

How to Make Observations like a Scientist Many of science’s most important breakthroughs, from the discovery of microorganisms to the theory of evolution, have come about through observation. The scientist’s gaze is clearly a powerful tool for making sense of how the world works. But it is not the same as “everyday observation,” as Catherine Eberbach and Kevin Crowley call the kind of casual looking done by those of us who don’t wear lab coats. “Seeing is not observing,” the University of Pittsburgh researchers point out. As practiced by scientists, observation is a rigorous activity that integrates what the scientists are seeing with what they already know and what they think might be true.

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