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7 Things To Remember About Classroom Feedback

7 Things To Remember About Classroom Feedback
Feedback is an inevitable part of teaching. Naturally, you’re in a position where you’re giving a whole lot of feedback, but you’re likely on the receiving end of feedback as well. We’ve all been on the receiving end of feedback in various aspects of our lives, and I’m sure we’ve all experienced some feedback that was less than desirable – for a variety of reasons. Even if the feedback itself is inherently negative, the delivery and process of the feedback doesn’t have to be. The handy infographic below (from ASCD) offers 7 important things to remember about feedback. These are important items to remember both when you’re giving and getting feedback. Feedback is not advice, praise or evaluation.

http://www.edudemic.com/feedback-infographic/

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Assessment and Rubrics A collection of rubrics for assessing portfolios, group work/cooperative learning, concept map, research process/ report, PowerPoint, oral presentation, web page, blog, wiki, and other social media projects. Quick Links to Rubrics Social Media Project Rubrics

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